Inman Family History & Genealogy

15 photos, 13,300 biographies, and last name history of the Inman family, shared by AncientFaces Members.
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Biographies & Family Trees

Most Common First Names

  • John 2.7%
  • William 2.7%
  • James 2.7%
  • Robert 2.0%
  • Mary 1.8%
  • Charles 1.7%
  • George 1.3%
  • Thomas 1.0%
  • Joseph 0.8%
  • David 0.8%
  • Richard 0.7%
  • Edward 0.7%
  • Dorothy 0.6%
  • Harold 0.6%
  • Helen 0.6%
  • Arthur 0.6%
  • Frank 0.6%
  • Margaret 0.6%
  • Henry 0.6%
  • Walter 0.5%

Inman Last Name History & Origin

History

Name Origin

Inman Death Records & Life Expectancy

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Memories

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Jo Martin I have great memories of my grandfather, Zeb Inman. He played games with me and showed me how to dance. He had lovely brown eyes. Once, thinking I was paying him the greatest compliment in the world, I told him his eyes were as pretty as old Queen (one of my Dad's hunting dogs.) He did not take it as a compliment, but he knew I loved him. He visited us when my son was just beginning to walk. I had placed Gordon in a playpen out on the patio while I was preparing dinner and Grandpa was out with him. He came into the kitchen and told me "while, it seems a shame to keep the little fella in a cage." I told him I would let him out if he would promise to watch him. In about ten or fifteen minutes, he came in the house and told me, "while, you can put him back in the cage if you want to." Needless to say, Gordon had tired Grandpa as he tried to keep up with him in the yard.

He died 52 days before his 95th birthday. So much history had played out in our nation and world in his lifetime. And so many memories of that history died with him. I wish I had taken the time and interest when he was around to have talked with him more about family and the history he could remember. Man had moved from horse and wagon to rockets going into space. Telephones had brought families closer, and automobiles made life a little easier. Grandpa watched all of this without ever being overwhelmed with it. After all, he was the man, who, after selling his tobacco, had bought a bottle of moonshine to celebrate the good crop and on the way home, had probably emptied the bottle. While driving the wagon past a cemetery in the community in the dark of night, he was the one that saw the ghost chasing him home. He galloped the horses and wagon into the yard, jumped out and ran into the house, declaring to everyone what he had seen. With experiences like that, who would be awed by a telephone or rocket? He had such a good sense of humor. One of the radio programs he really loved was the "Grand Ole Opry" on Saturday nights. When he was visiting us in our home, our radio was always turned to the station that carried that program. (Even though it did come on at the same time of "The Hit Parade." Everyone needed a Grandpa like I had.
Dec 01, 2002 · Reply
David Inman Inman Family History as told by Carroll Crosby Inman, whom I'm named after (David Carroll Inman). As found on the Inman Compendium web site.
June 12, 1971
The Inman family moved from Pennsylvania to South Carolina and were closely associated with the Mitchells. Arthur Inman married Nancy Mitchell. They had three sons and one daughter. Henderson was one of the boys, another was John and the girl was named Mary. They migrated from South Carolina over to Alabama about the 1850's. Henderson Inman was born Feb 14, 1849 in South Carolina. Arthur Inman and his two oldest boys, John and the other one, joined the First Alabama Calvary of the Union Army at the out break of the Civil War. They left Arthur's wife Nancy, Henderson and Mary on the farm in Alabama. The rebels kept trying to get Nancy Inman to tell where her husband Arthur and her boys were. She refused or gave false information - had she not done this or told the truth they would have confiscated what little property they had.
The rebels came to the house one day and took Henderson, fourteen years old, and told Nancy they would hang Henderson by the thumbs and make him tell where his father and brothers were. His mother told the rebels they couldn't take him away until he put on a clean shirt, so they let him go in the house and put on a clean shirt. He went out the back door into the woods and hid in a brush pile. The rebels looked for him for quite a while and couldn't find him. Then they went away. Sister Mary carried food to him for a day or two. Knowing the rebels would be back, Henderson ran away to join the Union Army which was then located in Tennessee. He got through the rebel lines and located his father, was only thirteen or fourteen at the time. However, the Union Command let him join the First Alabama Calvary Union Army. His father, Arthur, died at Corinth, Mississippi and is buried at the Union Cemetery there. His brother, John, was poisoned by a rebel woman. They were foraging for food. This lady baked corn pone and put strychnine in it. They all died.
Henderson Inman was mustered out at the end of the war at Memphis, Tennessee and returned to Alabama. In the meantime, his mother and sister hitched up mules to their wagon and left Alabama driving through rebel lines to Tennessee where Mary met George Maxwell whom she later married and they returned to Alabama. Henderson and another brother were pretty wild, being young men and unrestricted, they did everything except murder.
Henderson left Alabama and went to Southern Illinois, Union County, where he worked on a farm owned by Captain Lance. He worked there for sometime, returning to Alabama and them went cross country back to South Carolina where he met Laura Jane Willis whom he married. Laura had seven brothers and sisters; Fay, Kemper, James, Wylie, Lizzie, Purchas and Ella - Quincy was also a brother.
Henderson farmed in SC after his marriage and had one son, Carroll, born on a cotton plantation a short distance from Laurens on January 15, 1885. About one year later Henderson and his wife decided to move to Illinois where he had a job supervising a large farm acreage.
In 1887 a daughter was born, Daisy Pearl; and in 1889 another son was born, John; and in 1891 another son James was born. James died six months later. Laura died about two months after James was born in 1891. Henderson at that time was farming and had considerable livestock, etc. His sisters-in-law, Lizzie and Perchas came to help take care of the children; Carroll, Daisy, John and James. They said if Henderson would move back to SC they would keep house for him and help raise the children. Henderson sold out in Illinois and moved to Greenville, SC where he managed a cotton plantation owned by a man named Ellis.
Henderson met a man by the name of Pool in Greenville who had considerable experience in the grocery business but no money. He persuaded Henderson to go into the grocery business, which he did making Pool a partner. In about two years Henderson had the experience and Pool had the money.
Henderson decided to move back to Illinois and hire a housekeeper to do the housework and help raise the children. Henderson always said he would not separate the children but raise them together. He went back to supervising a large farm acreage for two or three years, then went to farming for himself which he continued to do until the time of his death July 1, 1901. A guardian was appointed for the children by the court and George Maxwell and his wife Mary, Henderson's sister, said they would take the children. George Maxwell came to Jonesboro and took Daisy and John back with him leaving Carroll to take care of the livestock and other personal property until the sale. After the sale, Carroll joined George and Mary Maxwell at their home in Marion County northwest Alabama. Daisy stayed one year and their Uncle Wylie in Laurens, SC wrote and wanted her to come and live with him. This was agreeable to all parties and she went to her Uncle Wylie's to live. Carroll and John stayed in Alabama for a couple of years and their Uncle Kemper, station agent for the Southern Railway at Williamston, wrote and said if Carroll came and lived with him he would teach him telegraphy so he could get a job on the railroad.
Daisy had taken a business course and had a job as a bookkeeper. Uncle Wylie wanted John to come and live with him as he had no children. Carroll and John left Alabama for South Carolina. Carroll completed his telegraphy course and station work in about nine months and was employed by the Southern Railway. John stayed with Uncle Wylie but became dissatisfied because other employees were making more money than Uncle Wylie was paying him. He quit Uncle Wylie's job and got a job as an express messenger on the railroad. Made one trip to Augusta, GA when his Uncle Wylie went and got him and persuaded him to come back and gave him a raise in allowance.
Uncle Carroll was on Lowell, NC but lost that job because someone stole $1200.00. He started booming and went to Cincinnati and Indianapolis and got a job on the N.Y. Central Railroad, Indianapolis Division, Indianapolis to St. Louis. In the meantime working on the L&N Railroad located at Bowling Green, KY where he met and married Kathryn Mize. Lost that job because he belonged to Union of Railroad Telegraphers.
Then he went to Indianapolis where he railroaded until 1914 and went into insurance business with Aetna Life Insurance and was with them until 1917 at which time he went with Illinois Mutual as Executive Vice President.
Retired May 1, 1957 and lived happily ever after.
About the time of Edward's death, another Edward Inman was born in Wales. His descendants apparently settled in the Carolinas, as well as in Maryland. In Record: The Inmans and those Related, I found the following:
My ancestor was Edward Inman Born in Wales about 1707 settled in London England. Had a family of 5 sons and 2 daughters. The 2 daughters died in early life Henry Inman Eldest son joined The English navy at 18 years of age died in The English Navey (sic) as Captain of Ship sunke (sic) in Battle 1799. John Inman second son served as a Soldier (?) years. Benjamin 3d son. Jahuh 4 son and Joshuay 5. Emmigrated to America in 1760 after 8 months voyage landed in Charleston Harber S.C. Settled at Newberry S.C. Benjamin Inman had a family of 8 children 8 sons: Ahab, Arther, Benjamin, Jehuh, Fraseth, Chas. George and William & Elizabeth. Hauhu Inman had a family of 10 children 1801. Joshuay Inman had a family of 8 children 1814. George Inman was my Grandfather, he emigrated from Newberry S.C. to Pleasanthill, Ohio in 1818 had a family of 6 children: Henry, George Benjamin, Sarah Anne and Susan. A D.W. Inman a grand son of this sketch.(15)
Feb 28, 2007 · Reply
David Inman John L. Inman writes on his web site: "In 1619 the first INMAN came to America on the Falcon ship. He was 26 years old. In 1646 Edward Inman came. Soon thereafter, many others came." The Inman Compendium web site has these tid bits of history. "About the time of Edward's death, another Edward Inman was born in Wales. His descendants apparently settled in the Carolinas, as well as in Maryland. In Record: The Inmans and those Related, I (an Inman Family researcher) found the following:
My ancestor was Edward Inman Born in Wales about 1707 settled in London England. Had a family of 5 sons and 2 daughters. The 2 daughters died in early life Henry Inman Eldest son joined The English navy at 18 years of age died in The English Navey (sic) as Captain of Ship sunke (sic) in Battle 1799. John Inman second son served as a Soldier (?) years. Benjamin 3d son. Jahuh 4 son and Joshuay 5. Emmigrated to America in 1760 after 8 months voyage landed in Charleston Harber S.C. Settled at Newberry S.C. Benjamin Inman had a family of 8 children 8 sons: Ahab, Arther, Benjamin, Jehuh, Fraseth, Chas. George and William & Elizabeth. Hauhu Inman had a family of 10 children 1801. Joshuay Inman had a family of 8 children 1814. George Inman was my Grandfather, he emigrated from Newberry S.C. to Pleasanthill, Ohio in 1818 had a family of 6 children: Henry, George Benjamin, Sarah Anne and Susan. A D.W. Inman a grand son of this sketch.(15)
Mar 07, 2007 · Reply
David Inman On "The Inman Compendium" an Inman Family researcher tells this story about my Great-Great-Grandfather, Arthur Inman and my great-grandfather, Henderson Inman. An interesting piece of history is that Arthur Inman and one of his sons, John, joined the 1st AL Cavalry of the Union Army. Both were killed during the war. The war records indicate that John died of the measles, but a descendant told the story that both Arthur and John died from poisoning by a MS farmer's wife while foraging for food.
> Later, when Confederate recruiters were at the front door of Arthur Inman's house looking for Henderson, Henderson's mother, Nancy, delayed them while getting Henderson to run out the back door. He also joined the 1st AL Cavalry of the Union Army. At some time during the war, his right hand was crippled and he was discharged within the year at Memphis. He received disability pay afterwards. Military records show he was 5'7" with a dark complexion.

Arthur Inman was the son of Benjamin Inman III. Arthur was married to Nancy Mitchell Inman. John and Henderson Inman were two of Arthur and Nancy's children.
Mar 07, 2007 · Reply
Katie Nunez I do not know very much about my Inman side of the family so if anyone could help that would be great! My grandfather's name was Carlton William Inman and he was born July 23, 1933 and passed away June 12, 2004. He lived most of his life in Grand Rapids, MI. I would love any information and will share any as soon as I get some!
Apr 07, 2008 · Reply
Katie Nunez I have a little more information on my Inman family... My great grandma's name was Wilma J. Inman (maiden name was Hooper or Hopper... don't know the spelling!) and great grandpa was Carlton Inman. Anyone heard of these two?
Jun 29, 2008 · Reply
Ella Stamps I just recently found out that my gggrandmother is buried less than 5 miles from my house! Unfortunately, that is about all I know so far. Her name was Sarah Ann INMAN. I do not know where she was born, but eventually lived in Marshall Co., (which may have been part of Calloway County back then) KY. I found one census where she is living with her uncle who was a NICHOLS. I have not been able to find out what happened to her family yet. Later she married Elijah REEVES (possibly the son of William REEVES) and they had at least 2 children, Fred and Amie Florance REEVES. I do know she was born in 1863 and died in 1936. When we visited the cemetery, we discovered that Elijah was not buried with her. So far I have not discovered what happened to him either. We think he might possibly have been originally from Illinois, but aren't sure. I am fairly new to all this genealogy stuff. I haven't had a whole lot of luck on [external link] (I may be doing something wrong). So if anyone knows anything about Sarah and/or Elijah, or if you can give me some ideas on researching, please contact me.
Jun 28, 2010 · Reply