Van Bibber Family History & Genealogy

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Van Bibber Last Name History & Origin

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Bev Gillihan The following info. was found in our Tombstones of Mathews Co.,Va. on page 98 -North End Cemetery (Between the Branches of North River) Perhaps of interest is the fact that John Page, of North End, who served as a member of the Council & General Court in 1768, died in 1774. (1) In 1782, Abraham Van Bibber was taxed on 550 acres & Isaac Van Bibber was taxed on 500 acres the same year. (2) In 1791, when the first tax list was made for the new county of Mathews, Abraham Van Bibber was taxed on 925 acres. (3) The home was named North End.
The Vestry of Ware Episcopal Church in Gloucester Co., gave to the Joseph Bryan Branch of the Association for the Preservation of Va. Antiquities a section of the Ware Church Cemetery for isolated & uncared for gravestones.
The following stones have been moved to Ware Church & are in lots 148 and 149:

Abraham M. Van Bibber
Birth: Apr., 1801
Death: Jan. 27, 1802
Stone only, moved from North End Cemetery in Mathews County

HESTER VAN BIBBER TABB
HESTER D...(T)ABB
WIFE OF DOCTOR HEN (T)AB
AND ONLY (DAUGHTER)
OF ANDREW AND SARAH VAN
BIBBER/Born 2nd (?)1800/(Died) 4 Feb. 1823

Abraha?)(ABRAHAM) VAN BIBBER
2d son of (ANDREW) and Sarah E. Van Bibber
departed this life Jan 27th,1802 Aged 9 months
Ad Tranquier

ANDREW VAN BIBBER,ESQ.
who departed this life Aug 4th, 1808
Aged 40 years.
And underneath this same stone
are deposited at her own request the mortal remains of his relic SARAH EMORY VAN BIBBER
who died the 15th of March 1836 Aged 67 years
"With upward aim thy wings for she was born from heav'n Fufill'd her visit and return'd on high.
(NOTE: Andrew Van Bibber Birth: 1768
Death: Aug. 4, 1808
Stone only, moved from North End Cemetery in Mathews County)

Andrew A. Van Bibber
Birth: unknown
Death: Feb. 28, 1842
Stone only, moved from North End Cemetery in Mathews County

HESTER VAN BIBBER
relic of Capt. Henry van Bibber
mother of Andrew Van Bibber, Esq.
departed this lif (sic) Nov 16,1802 Aged 65
Hester A. Van Bibber
Birth: 1737
Death: Nov. 16, 1802
Stone only, moved from North End Cemetery in Mathews County

Sarah Emory Van Bibber
Birth: 1769
Death: Mar. 15, 1836
Stone only, moved from North End Cemetery in Mathews County
NOTE: LINEAGE
Hester4 VanBibber (Isaac Jacobs3, Jacob Isaacs2, Isaac1) was born May 09, 1693. She married Jacob Gooding, son of Isaac Gooding. He was born May 09, 1698, and died December 23, 1760.
Children of Hester VanBibber and Jacob Gooding are:
2 i. Isaac5 Gooding. He married Susanna.
3 ii. Jacob Gooding.
4 iii. Veronica Gooding. She married Andrew Cannon.
+ 5 iv. Hester Gooding, died November 16, 1802.
Generation 11:
Hester5 Gooding (Hester4 VanBibber, Isaac Jacobs3, Jacob Isaacs2, Isaac1) died November 16, 1802. She married Henry VanBibber, son of Jacobus VanBibber and Ann Laroun. He was born July 22, 1729 in Cecil Co., MD, and died 1778.
Children of Hester Gooding and Henry VanBibber are:
6 i. Andrew A.6 VanBibber, born 1768; died August 04, 1808. He married Sarah E. Emery; born 1769; died March 15, 1836.
7 ii. James VanBibber. He married Elizabeth Dorsey 1787 in Baltimore, MD; born October 24, 1766.
8 iii. Henry Jr. VanBibber.
````````````````````````````````````````````````
Conclusion:

Capt. Henry Van Bibber born July 22, 1729, son of James Van Bibber and Ann Larons/Laroun, married Hester Gooding, 1737-Nov. 16, 1802. They lived at North End, a home on the North River, Mobjack Bay, Mathews County, Virginia. Hester Gooding Van Bibber was buried in North End Cemetery.
They had 3 children, Andrew, James, and Henry, Jr.
Andrew, born about 1768, married Sarah Emory, born about 1769, and they lived at North End. Andrew Van Bibber died August 4, 1808, age 40; and Sarah Emory Van Bibber, died March 15, 1836, age 67. Andrew and Sarah Emory Van Bibber were buried in North End Cemetery. They had (at least) 3 children. (Information from gravestones seems to indicated an oldest son, born before 1800.)

1. Hester Van Bibber, born ? 2, 1800, married Dr. Henry Wythe Tabb of Auburn, died Feb. 4, 1823. No issue. (only daughter)
2. (Abraha?)m Van Bibber, born 1801, died Jan. 27, 1802, aged 9 months. (2d son)
3. Andrew A. Van Bibber, born after 1801, died Feb. 28, 1842. (youngest son)
These three children were buried in North End Cemetery.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Adjoining Midlothian .. (built by Mr. Josiah Deans over one hundred sixty years ago, near the head of the North River).. and at the very head of the North River, used to stand North End. The house is long since gone but it was formerly a Van Bibber estate. 'Mrs. Van Bibber, of North End' was the devout congregation of one, who made the responses to Dr. William Taliaferro's readings in Ware Church during the time when there was no minister to conduct the service. Sometimes Mrs. Van Bibber would have to guard against the cold with extra wraps, and a charcoal brazier for her feet.
"On the North River in Mathews County, adjoining Green Plains, (the house named) Auburn was built in the early 1800's by Philip Tabb for his son, Dr. Henry Wythe Tabb…. Dr. Henry Wythe Tabb was married three times; first to Hester Van Bibber; from this union there was no issue….."
"Issue of Mary Mason Wythe and Philip Tabb: John, of White Marsh; Henry Wythe, of Auburn; Philip Edward, of Waverley; Thomas Todd, of Toddsbury."

Ware Church
"Near the head of the Ware River and not far from the old 'War Path' or 'Indian Road' stands Ware Church, the old brick rectangular building where citizens of Gloucester County have worshipped for nearly three hundred years. …The present building …was completed soon after 1690."

The "old Mrs. Van Bibber" who attended Ware Church as a "devout congregation of one" was probably Sarah Emory Van Bibber. "There was …almost always….(a minister), with the exception of ten years prior to 1826…..During one period, when the church had no rector, Dr. William Taliaferro went faithfully every Sunday morning to red the prayers and lessons and Psalms of the service, while the lone member of the congregation, 'old' Mrs. Van Bibber, of North End, made the responses. Bishop Meade* comments of the devout character of these two saintly people."

*Meade, William, bp. 1789-1862. Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia. Philadelphia, 1872.

NOTE: There are photos of Andrew and Sarah's tombstones at:
[external link] va/wareparish2.html
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Ernest Clay
Infant
119 Second Avenue
d. 10/05/1912
Buried; 10/05/1912 Oak Hill Cemetery, Evansville, Indiana
Cause of death; Infantile Convulsions

Van Bibber Carl
St. Mary's Hospital,
d. 10/29/1918
Buried; 10/30/1918
Vanderburgh County, Indiana
Cause of death; Influenza
Divorced

Van Bibber Fay
Deaconess Hospital
d. 10/03/1944
Buried; 10/05/1944, Indiana
Cause of death; Cerebral Hemorrhage
Single

Van Bibber Gladis M.
Babies Milk Fund Hospital
d. 07/12/1918
Buried; 07/13/1918, Evansville,Indiana
Cause of death; Bronchitis
Single

Van Bibber Harold C.
523 1/2 Sycamore Street
d. 01/16/1913
Buried; 01/17/1913
Evansville,Indiana
Cause of death;
Infant

Van Bibber Infant
127 2nd Avenue
30 Minutes
d, 01/04/1914
Buried. 01/05/1914 Indiana
Premature Birth, Infant

Van Bibber Jacob
1616 E. Virgiia Street
d. 11/29/1899
Buried; 12/01/1899 Ohio
Cause of Death; Old Age
Widower

Van Bibber John P.
1415 E. Oregon Street
d. 08/11/1912
Buried; 08/13/1912, Knox County, Indiana
Cause of death; Mitral Regurgitation
Married

Van Bibber Joseph
B-237 Evansville, Indiana
d. 04/23/1923
Buried; 04/24/1923, Indiana
Cause of death; Ruptured Atarcho of Aortia
Single

Van Bibber Myrdith F.
915 W. Ohio
d. 09/14/1916, Evansville, Indiana
Cause of death; Cerebral Meningitis
Child
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan VANBEBER, J. Emert, born Feb. 8, 1870, died June 26, 1950
VANBEBER, Mary, born Jan. 17, 1880, died Dec. 30, 1956
VANBEBER, Rex, born 1897, died 1900
VABEBER, Opal, born & died 1901
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan SAR #'s....
Name, Number
George L. VanBibber, NSAR# 015218,
Armfield F. VanBibber, NSAR#034977,
George L. VanBibber IV, NSAR#113361,
Isaac VanBebber, born 1725 in MD,
died 10 Oct 1774 VA, Serve: Pvt VA
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Marriage License Isd. To
Isaac Vanbebber and Sarah Hamelton July 23, 1839, by Wm Neil Clk. C. Stimp M.G. solemnized the Rites of Matrimony July 30, 1839.
NOTE: This is Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire, son of John VAN BEBBER, Sr.,
Esquire and Margaret CHRISMAN. Isaac married second to Sarah Parker HAMILTON, daughter of James HAMILTON, Sr., and Elizabeth "Betsy" WEAR. Only one child was born to this couple, Margaret Jane VAN BEBBER. It is believed that she died young before she married.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
James Vanbebber and Elizabeth Snuffer December 30, 1839, by William Neil, Clk. Wm McBee J.P. celebrated the rights of matrimony February 14, 1840.
NOTE: This is James VAN BEBBER, son of Isaac Hoover VAN BEBBER, Jr. (River) and Hannah LONG.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd to
John M. VanBebber and Manervia J. Kincaid April 12, 1843, by Wiley Huffaker Clk. Reuben Steele, M.G. celebrated the Rites of matrimony April 1843.
NOTE: John M. VAN BEBBER was the son of Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire, and his first wife, Mary MARTIN. Manervia Jane KINCAID was the first wife of John M. VAN BEBBER, she being the oldest daughter of William Harrison KINCAID and Susan WILSON.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
John Cawood and Marlena VanBebber July12, 1843, by Wiley Huffaker, Clerk.
NOTE: Marlena VAN BEBBER was the daughter of Gabriel VAN BEBBER and Barbara CARLOCK. Gabriel VAN BEBBER was the son of John VAN BEBBER and Margaret CHRISMAN.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
Ewing Yoakum and Martha Vanbebber March 15, 1845, by Thomas J. Johnson, Clerk. John Hurst, J.P. solomnized the Rites of matrimony March 21, 1845.
NOTE: Ewing YOAKUM was the oldest child of Robert YOAKUM and Parkey BERRY; Robert being the son of George YOAKUM, I., and Martha VAN BEBBER.
Ewing YOAKUM married married Martha Elizabeth VAN BEBBER, daughter of Isaac
VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire and Mary MARTIN.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
Canada Rogers and Nancy Malinda Vanbebber October 2, 1846.
NOTE: Canada ROGERS was the son of Major David ROGERS and Mary LEWIS.
Nancy Malinda VAN BEBBER was the daughter of Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire and Mary MARTIN.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
A. Vanbebber and Louisa Lee February 24, 1848. William McBee, J.P. solomnized the Rites of matrimony February 25, 1848.
NOTE: Alexander VAN BEBBER was the son of Gabriel VAN BEBBER and Barbara CARLOCK.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License isd. To
John Wagly and Eliza Vanbebber August 19, 1850. Isaac Thomas, J.P. executed by uniting the within named persons together as Husband and Wife at the dwelling house of Isaac Vanbeber August 15 (?), 1850.
NOTE: Eliza VAN BEBBER was Louisa Anne VAN BEBBER, daughter of Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., and Mary MARTIN.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
William W. Yoakum and Nancy Poff September 26, 1850. (?) Lynch, J.P., executed the within by celebrating the rites of matrimony December 30, 1850.
NOTE: William Wylie YOAKUM was the son of Isaac YOAKUM, I., and Mary DAVIS; Isaac being the son of George YOAKUM, I., and Martha VAN BEBBER.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
James Grimes and Matilda Leford Sept. 29, 1841, by Wiley Huffaker Clk. Adam Yearry; J.P. celebrated the rites of matrimony September 30, 1841
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. to
James N. Liford and Manervy Hatfield April 29, 1843, by Wiley Huffaker, Clk. S. Dobbs, M.G. celebrated the Rites of matrimony April 30, 1843.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
_______Liford and Sophia Grace June 12, 1843, by
Wiley Huffaker, Clk. S. Hobbs, M.G. celebrated the Rites of Matrimony June 12, 1843.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License Isd. To
James Wallen and Levisa Liford December 5, 1843, by Wiley Huffaker, Clerk. James Chick, J.P. solemnized the Rites of matrimony
December 10, 1843.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marriage License isd. To
William Daniel and Mary Liford January 11, 1847.
S. Hobbs, M.G. celebrated the Rites of matrimony January 12, 1847.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Jesse Van Bibber, served in the Kanawha County Rangers, under Captain Hugh Caperton. The Rangers served up and down the Kanawha Valley, protecting the settlers, from Indian attacks, in the late 1700s. When Fort Lee was founded, the Rangers were hired as scouts and messengers. A Ranger was the last man to be killed by Indians in the Kanawha Valley. After this service as a Ranger, Jesse Van Bibber, was commissioned as a Captain in the Virginia Militia. He served in the Militia till 1808, when he resigned. He owned a farm at the mouth of Thirteen Mile Creek, in the Union District, of Mason County. He resided on this farm till he and his wife Rachel (Greenlee) Van Bibber had died. Jesse, his wife, and young son, Isaac Van Bibber, were buried in the Van Bibber-Smith Cemetery, on his farm. This cemetery was destroyed in later years.
In Mason County Court Records, there are several entries for Jesse Van Bibber. He served on several Juries for the county. In the Order Book, December 15 1818, application of Jonas Smith, for a road to Jesse Van Bibber's on the Rocky Fork Road of Thirteen Mile Creek, and thence to the public road on the northeast bank of the Great Kanawha (River), near Edward Greenlee. At a Court held October 19 1819, a petition for a road from the Court House to (Jesse) Van Bibber's Bridge.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The following information is from the military record of John Van Bebber, Jr., who served in the War of 1812. This record was received from the National Archives and contained the following two muster sheets:

John Vanbibber, Pvt., Capt. John Brock's Company of East Tennessee Militia, in regiment commanded by Col. Samuel Bayles. (War of 1812.)
Company Muster Roll for November 8, 1814 to May 18, 1815.
Roll dated May 18, 1815.
Commencement of service or of this settlement - November 8, 1814.
Expiration of service or of this settlement - February 11, 1815.
Term of service charged - 3 months and 4 days.
Pay per months - 8 dollars.
Amount of pay - 25 dollars and 6 cents.
Remarks: Died February 11, 1815.
Note: Non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates are entitled to traveling allowance of pay for traveling from Tazewell, Tennessee, to Knoxville, Tennessee, where mustered in, distance 45 miles; and no rations, or pay therefore, have been drawn on account of rations due at Mobile, Mississippi Territory.

BRIEF HISTORY: This regiment, along with Colonel William Johnson's Third Regiment and Colonel Edwin Booth's Fifth Regiment, defended the lower section of the Mississippi Territory, particularly the vicinity of Mobile. They protected the region from possible Indian incursions and any British invasion. These regiments were under the command of Major General William Carroll. They manned the various forts that were located throughout the territory: Fort Claiborne, Fort Decatur, and Fort Montgomery, for example. Sickness was rampant in this regiment and the desertion rate was high. The regiment mustered in at Knoxville and was dismissed at Mobile.
It is not known how John Van Bebber, Jr. died. Notice from the above how sickness was rampant in the regiment which John Van Bebber, Jr. was a member of.

The following can be located in the May term of the Claiborne County, Tennessee Court, 1815.

John Van Bebber, Jr., Deceased -- John Van Bebber, Sr. was appointed by the court to administer all and singularly the goods and chattel rights and credits of John Van Bebber, Jr., deceased. He gave security and made bond in amount of $200.00.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Artie Marie Van Bibber, our lost child:

On Nov. 8th. 1894, Ethel Van Bibber, orphaned daughter of William Albert and
Ann Mary Van Bibber, gave birth to a daughter. Ethel, barely fifteen years old, with no family and no husband, found herself alone and ill equipped for the task ahead of her. Artie's birth certificate lists the father as, Clinton Strong but there is no reason to believe that beyond being present at the conception, he ever played a part in his daughter's life.
We believe Clinton Strong to be the Grandson (Step) of Delilah (Van Bibber) Strong and her husband, John. Delilah was the sister of Martha J. O. Van Bibber and the maternal Grandmother of Ethel.

Ethel was raised in the Warrick County Orphan's Home and records indicate
that at age thirteen she was sent to the county Poorhouse which was common in the late 1800's. We can only assume that the Strongs took her into their home due to the family connection. What happened between the time she entered their home and gave birth we can only assume, there are no records for this period of her life.

We know nothing about the first three years of Artie Marie's life. We pick up the threads of her story in 1900 when she and Ethel were recorded on the 1900 Warrick County Census. Ethel is listed as eighteen years old, single with one child, Marie, aged three. It is ten years before we find Ethel again, on the 1910 Census. Ethel is listed as married to William Crow, aged 28, the mother of two children, both living but only Hershell, aged 8 is named. No mention of Artie Marie who should have been thirteen years old.

The discovery of a Marriage license solved the mystery of Artie Marie's whereabouts. On June 7th. 1911, Artie Marie married, George Southwell. The license gives her date of birth as 1895 which we know is not correct and simply means.....she lied about her age and was in fact, thirteen years old when she married and her groom was twenty years older.

We next find Artie Marie in the Wesley Chapel Cemetery. Her Tombstone reads:
George M. Southwell, Sept. 28, 1878 - March 17, 1941
Artie M. His Wife, March 30, 1897 - Nov. 21, 1918

Artie Marie is dead at age twenty-one and is buried beside her husband, George who lived until 1941 and died at age, sixty three.

Why did she die so young? We don't know! Did she and George have children of
their own? We don't know! Did George love Artie Marie and care for her? We think he did! He never re-married and he chose to be buried next to his wife twenty three years after her death. What we do know for certain is that Ethel never told any family member about her daughter. I have interviewed everyone still living and gone through family records and there is no mention of Artie Marie anywhere. Family members still living can attest to that fact.

I think this is incredibly sad! It seems Artie Marie was hidden away for many years and then allowed or possibly even, forced to marry when still a child so she could be erased forever from her family history. She would have remained nameless forever had we not found the records and investigated them.

There is probably much more to be learned about our Artie Marie but I doubt
that we will ever know the entire story. I hope to do for her in death what no one did in her life, acknowledge that she is ours!
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Martha Jane Van Bibber, the wife of James Wiley Mayfield. Although she has never been identified it is believed she is the daughter of Jacob Van Bibber, son of Peter Van Bibber and Catherine Ridenour. Jacob and Catherine had a son Landa, born about 1838 which little is known of him. There is a record of a "Land VanBiber" who served in Company H, 15th Regiment, Texas Cavalry which just has to be him. Jacob shows up on the 1850 census, as a 14 year old boy, living with his parents and other siblings in Polk County, Arkansas. On his military pension files he indicates he was born in Carroll, Arkansas. This was most likely Carroll County as this is where his father, Peter Van Bibber, was recorded on the 1836 and 1837 Tax List. I have never been able to find Jacob or his parents on the 1860 census, but one would believe they were in Texas by this year. Other siblings of Jacob were recorded on the 1860 census as living in Hunt County, Texas. Martha Jane Van Bibber, who is believed to be the daughter of Jacob, according to the 1900 census was born in Feb. 1859. If so, then Jacob and Sarah Stone were most likely married by this date. I have never been able to find a marriage on them either. On August 18, 1861, Jacob enlisted in the Confederate States Army at Greenville, Hunt County, Texas. He served in Company C, 27th Texas Cavalry. This unit was also called 1st Texas Legion or Whitfield's Legion. In September 1862, Jacob's unit participated in the Battle of Iuka, Mississippi. It is this battle where Jacob was wounded, receiving a wound to his right thigh and across the head. He was left in the hands of the enemy where he was hospitalized and later paroled. It appears Jacob later joined a unit from Tennessee, was captured at Clifton, Tennessee and held prisoner at Alton, Illinois. This was the first part of April 1864. He was then taken to City Point Landing on the James River below Richmond, Virginia, where he was exchanged in April 1865. He was ordered to the command of General Tom Whitfield in Columbia, Tennessee. He was sent to Hardin County, Tennessee for furlough (most likely to check on his wife and son) and the war closed before he could get back to his command. All the above information is in his pension application.
After the war, Jacob and his family lived in Oak Hill, Hardin Co., Tenn. Jacob lived to be a ripe old age of 100 yrs, 5 mos, and 1 day at the time of his death which occurred on July 15, 1929. Him and his wife are buried in New Harmony Cemetery, Hardin Co., TN. I have never been able to find a marriage license for him and Evaline Abagail Alexander, but they were married sometime around 1863 because their oldest son, Robert Newton Van Bibber, was born about 1864. The 1900 census states they were married for 37 years.
Evaline was the daughter of William Taylor Alexander and Ruth Lacefield and had been previously married to William Bishop before her marriage to Jacob and they had two children, John T. - 1860 and Ruth Tennessee Bishop - 1862. Looking at the 1870 census one would believe they were Van Bibber children, but they were from her first marriage. Jacob and Evaline would have three children; Robert Newton, Charles and Minnie. Robert married Mattie Wells and settled in Alcorn Co., Miss. which is just right across the border from Hardin Co., Tenn. Charles died young and Minnie married James R. Gant.

It is very possible Jacob was first married to Sarah Stone and was the father of Mary Jane Van Bibber. As you said, Sarah died shortly after the birth of Mary. Jacob went off to war and Mary was raised by her grandparents. She is living with Martin and Nancy Stone on the 1870 census of Commanche Co., Texas as an eleven year old, but is listed as Mary J. Stone and not Van Bibber. Jacob is wounded and while he is recuperating he is married to Evaline (Alexander) Bishop around 1863 and a year later their son Robert is born. In the mean time he joins up with another unit from Tennessee, taken prisoner, exchanged and then shortly thereafter the war ends. He returns to his wife and son there in Oak Hill, Hardin Co., Tenn. and this is where he lives the rest of his life.
He first applied for a Confederate pension in 1902 and it was never approved. In November 1914, Jacob wrote a letter asking for information regarding his second Application #6482 which was submitted in October 1912. Jacob stated he was 84 years old, "broken down," and could not support himself.
In a letter dated September 14, 1915 to Jacob Van Bibber, stating that his war record showed that he had enlisted in 1861; afterwards captured at Clifton, Tennessee in 1863 and sent to prison at Alton, Illinois, where he took the oath in 1864. "Under these statements of facts you are certainly not pensionable, unless it can be clearly shown that at the time you took the oath you were unable for service and remained so until the close of the war."
In a letter from Jacob Van Bibber dated September 9, 1920 he stated he was an old Confederate Soldier, age 94 years. He wanted his case reviewed and he to be advised. Jacob received a letter from Ernest N. Haston, Secretary of State for the state of Tennessee, dated July 26, 1927, advising him that his application for a CSA pension had been approved. I guess they got tired of dealing with Jacob and figured at the age of 98 years he couldn't live that much longer.
For more information on Tennessee Confederate Pension Applications go to their website.
NAME: Vanbiber, Jacob
PENSION #: S6482
COUNTY: Hardin
UNIT: 1st Tex. Legion (Cav.)
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan W. H. Vanbibber - 3 Sept 1901
Mark Vanbibber - 16 Aug 1896
William P. - 1911
Sarah J. Wylie - 20 Feb 191
Left side: W. P. VanBebber Oct 23, 1868
Sept 30, 1911
Front face of stone: W. H. Van Bebber Jan 20, 1834
Sep 3, 1901
Sarah J. 1850 - 1915
Left side: Mark Van Bebber Feb 6, 1876
Aug 13, 1896
(Large carved Women of Woodcraft seal on front face of stone.)
Estimated that the stone is about 5' 5" tall and about 40-45" wide. It is made of rough hewn cement made to look like stone. On the left side of the large stone are two smaller ones with half moon shaped tops. On the tops are carved:
Far left: "WILLIAM" next to him "MOTHER"
Far right: "FATHER" next to him "MARK"
The Cemetery is the IOOF on Cherry Heights Road, The Dalles, Oregon 97058.
SUICIDE OF WM. VANBIBBER
Hung Himself in the Cow Shed This Morning.
Upon receiving the startling news of the suicide of Wm. VanBibber yesterday afternoon at a time so near our publication hour we were unable to give but the meagerest report, but upon inquiry we understand that Mr. VanBibber had given no sign in the morning of an unusual despondency. On the contrary, early in the morning he offered to assist his wife with her washing, but she declined saying she was afraid he might make his rheumatism worse by putting his hands into the water. He then said he would go down into the bean patch and told the hired man to harness Mrs. Vanbibber’s horse as she wished to go to town later. He was accustomed to coming in for his lunch about noon, and as he failed to return, Tom Laurenzen, who employed by them, started to the garden to look for him. Going through the cow shed on his way down he saw Mr. Vanbibber at the other end of the shed and being unable to discern his position from where he stood, called to him. What was the man’s horror as he came near and saw he had hung himself. Taking a medium sized rope he had thrown it twice over a scantling about a foot above his head and held the end with his left hand. His knees were slightly bent, his toes touching the ground. The young man at once ran to the house, and Will Vanbibber himself carefully lifted the body down and removed it to the house. Neighbors were then sent for and arrived in a short time, when word was brought to the city. Dr. Shackelford, the family physician; the undertaker and Coroner Butts at once went down, but the latter deemed it unnecessary to hold an inquest.
William H. Vanbibber, who was born in Missouri sixty-seven years ago last June, came to The Dalles in the early 60’s. A short time after he was employed by Mr. Marsh, who kept a dairy below the city. In ’65 he went onto the same business for himself, and from that time until a year ago he has been a familiar figure driving into our city each morning and supplying his customers with milk. On November 10, 1867 he was married to Miss Johann Marsh, Rev. John T. Wolf performing the ceremony. To them two sons were born, William, who survives him, and Marcus, who drowned in the Columbia three years ago.
About a year ago Mr. Vanbibber had a severe attack of lung fever, from which he never fully survived, and of late has suffered much with rheumatism, having about lost the use of his right hand. Sunday he said to his son, "Will, I have lost my right hand and will soon lose the use of my leg. I’d rather be dead than helpless." His suffering, together with a despondency which had come from the loss of his son and the fact that he was compelled by ill health to give up his occupation, is thought to have been the cause of the final dejection, which no doubt led to the act that caused his death. His friends have remarked of late that "Van" was not himself. The shock which came to the community was great, for he was a friend to everybody and everybody a friend of his. Upright, good natured, honest and a splendid citizen, he will be sadly missed. To his wife, who has been a constant, faithful helpmate, the shock comes with terrible force; and, together with her son, she has the deepest sympathy of all. Beside his wife and son, Mr. Vanbibber leaves a brother, who lives at Lyle.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, September 7, 1901
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Walter Owen VanBibber Sr.
Walter was born on June
19, 1919 in Vanderburgh County, the Son of, Elza Curtis VanBibber and Helen Ethel Luttrell. Walter died Feb. 10, 1981 and is buried in St. Joseph cemetery, Evansville, IN.
Elza Curtis VanBibber (14 Dec 1874 - 12 Oct 1942) Elza was the son of Ratliff Boone VanBibber and Rachel Marquis. married Helen Ethel Luttrell (25 Sep 1883 - 12 Jan 1960) on January 8, 1900 in Alexandria, Virginia. Helen was the daughter of William Luttrell and Ida Ferguson. Both are buried in Park Lawn cemetery, Evansville, IN. Ratliff Boone Van Bibber was born in 1848, the Son of, Jonathan and Nancy VanBibber. Ratliff married Rachel on May 6, 1867 in Warrick Co. IN. Ratliff Boone Van Bibber, served in the 143rd Regiment of Indiana Volunteers during the Civil War as follows: Volunteer Enlistment, February 1, 1865, at Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana, for period of three years(muster records list one year enlistment), as a private: Ratliff B. Vanbibber, born Vanderburgh County, Indiana, 18 years old, farmer. He was listed on Company Muster Rolls as present in Company I, 143 Regiment Indiana Infantry, from that date until he was listed as having deserted from Ft Donaldson on 9/13/65, along with a U.S. Springfield rifle and accoutrements valued at $23.32. The Descriptive Roll identified him physically as gray eyes, light hair, fair complexion and 5 ft, 5 inches in height. Ratliff died on Jan. 5, 1900 and is buried in James cemetery in Vanderburg Co. with no tombstone to mark his burial site. If family history is accurate, Ratliff was a man of personal courage. Perhaps at only 5 foot five inches in height he had to assert himself. His last job was carrying large sacks of potatoes over his shoulder from the fields around Evansville. From this he contracted cancer in his arm and as it progressed they performed multiple amputations, starting with his hand. When they amputated the hand it was clinched. They buried it. Later he complained of pain in that hand and insisted that they dig it up and open the clenched fist. They did and the pain stopped.
Jonathan married Nancy Criswell (Chriswell) on December 9, 1844 in Vand. Co. I have failed to locate Jonathan and Nancy on the 1860 census and believe they are both desceased as of this date. I say this because Ratliff - 12, is living with Isaac VanBibber and his wife Missouri Ann Sutton on this census. Isaac was the younger brother of Jonathan therefore he was an uncle to Ratliff. Also living in the same home is Jacob VanBibber age 77 years. This
is Jacob which appears to be the father of both Jonathan and his brother Isaac. Louisa VB the sister of Ratliff married Thomas B. Alexander on March 12, 1865 in Warrick Co. Ratliff's brother Isaac married (1st) Eliza Hensholder on October 4, 1873 in Vand. Co. and they were divorced on June 13, 1881. On the same day his divorce was final, Isaac married (2nd) Marie
(Mollie) Shaefer also in Vand. Co. Jonathan married Polly Phillips on January 23, 1834 in Warrick Co. The parents of Jonathan have not been prove. I feel sure that his Father was Jacob Van Bibber but who did Jacob marry? I also believe this is the same Jacob mentioned in the estate settlement of Peter VanBibber who died there in Vand Co. in 1838. He is listed as the only living heir of the above Peter. Peter VanBibber III (above) married Sarah Yoakum and was the son of Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds with Jr. being the son of Peter VanBibber and his wife Anna.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Andrew Jackson VanBibber
~~~~~~~~~
A. J. VAN BIBBER
GERMAN ARMY = MEXICAN WAR = REGULAR ARMY = CIVIL WAR
Military marker ...............................B: A-9-10
A. J. VAN BIBBER
CO G - 2 IND L.A.
-----
ISA-5: ANDREW J. VAN BIBBER
PVT - CO. .. 2ND REG LIGHT ARTILLERY - 3 yrs.
ENR: 1 Sep 1861 - Capt Rabb - Indpls - Age 44
MUS: 1 Sep 1861 - Lt. Col. Wood - Indpls
(Notation: "VAN VILIBBER")
(Search neg ISA-5 for name of VAN VILIBBER)
-----
TERRELL: Vol 7 pg 608 - ENL MEN - 2ND BATTERY LT ART:
ANDREW J. VAN BIBBER - Res: Shelbyville IND
MUS: 1 Sep 1861
TRANSFERRED TO V.R.C. - 10 Oct 1865
-----
GAR NO. 62 - A. J. VAN BIBBER - Cooper - Edinburg
b: Ohio
ENT GAR: 14 Jul 1884 - Age 71
ENT SERV: 28 Aug 1861 - PRI CO G - 2 IND ARTY
DIS: 28 Aug 1864 - PRI CO G - 2nd IND - 36 mo.
CAUSE OF DISCHARGE - Expiration of term
~~~~~~~
KNOW YE, That Andrew J. Van Bibber a 3d Sergeant of Captain Charles Cresswel's Company F, Fourth Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, who was mustered on the Second day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty seven to serve during the war with Mexico, is hereby HONORABLY DISCHARGED from the service of the United States, this twenty second day of July 1848, at Cincinnati, Ohio by reason of being mustered out of the service on the expiration of his term.
Said Andrew J. Van Bibber was born in Harrison County in the State of Ohio is thirty four years of age, five feet 6 ½ inches high, dark complexion, black eyes, grey hair, and by occupation, when enlisted, a cooper.
GIVEN at Cincinnati this 22d day of July 1848.
Charles Cresswell, Capt.
Commanding Company.
~~~~~~~
DIED WEDNESDAY MARCH 9TH 1892
OBIT: Franklin REPUBLICAN - Fri 11 Mar 1892 p 8 - Edinburg item:
A. J. VAN BIBBER, aged about 82 years, died Wedns. morning at 4 o'clock. He had been in failing health. He served a term in the German Army, was a Mexican soldier, and served 3 years as a volunteer, and five years in the regular army -- in all about 15 years as a soldier. He was wounded several times, but not seriously. He was a man firm in his beliefs, and skeptical on religious matters. He drew a pension for his wounds, but was in moderate circumstances.

REF: Edbg COURIER --Thurs 9 Sep 1886 p 2 col 3 - FRANKLIN STAR - 26 ult.
Among the old soldiers before the pension board yesterday was ANDREW VAN
BIBBER of Edenburg who is in his 74th year. The old gentleman was in almost fourteen years of war for his country, fighting Indians on the frontier, in the Mexican War, and in the rebellion. He bears many battle scars. He related one instance where he and twenty-seven comrades, while acting as a surveying party in Oregon in 1849 with KIT CARSON as a guide -- they were compelled to live three months on dog meat and dog soup. He is a very intelligent gentleman, and his stories are far more interesting than those found in a book.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BOGGS, Lilburn W.: m'd BOONE, Panthea; brother-in-law of Alphonso Boone; (served as Gov. of MO;) cutoff for CA and became part of Donner Party:

BOONE, Alphonso D. (1796-1849): m'd 1822 BOONE, Nancy Linville; d/o Jesse and Chloe (VanBibber) Boone; g-grandson of Daniel and Rebecca (Bryan) Boone;
"when they reached the Cow Creek Canyon the family cached their goods (including Daniel Boone's compass and surveying instruments) and waded about twelve miles through the water and over big boulders. The emigrants went back the next spring but the Indians had found the things cached and there was nothing left. They packed one oxen with clothing and got into the Willamette Valley at the crossing of Mary's river on Christmas day. "; went to CA mines in 1849 and drowned in Feather River Canyon, CA 28 Nov 1849; wife had died (1838) in MO as had five children; established Boone's Ferry which continued to run for 107 years (it was taken out of service in 1954 when a bridge was built across the Willamette).
BOONE, Chloe Donnely: m'd 1848 CURRY, George Law; d/o Alphonso Boone; taught school the first winter; lived in Oregon City after marriage.

BOONE, George Luther (1826- ): did not emigrate with family in 1846, came to OR in 1848

BOONE, James C.:

BOONE, Jesse Van (1824-1872): m'd 1851 [], Elizabeth; s/o Alphonso Boone; operated ferry established by his father until his death.

BOONE, Mary Elizabeth: m'd NORRIS, Thomas; d/o Alphonso Boone

BOONE, Panthea: m'd BOGGS, Lilburn W.; d/o Jesse Boone, sister of Alphonso; accompanied husband to CA and became part of Donner Party.

BOSWORTH, John H.: m'd LOONEY, Susan

BOUNDS, John Bird (1800-1846): died on trail 13 Nov 1846
BOUNDS, John Bird: m'd 1850 LOVELADY, Sarah
BOUNDS, Jesse L. (1829- ): m'd 1853 [], Sarah Jane
BOUNDS, Nancy: m'd LINVILLE, Harrison
BOUNDS, Thomas L. (1824- ): m'd 1852 [], Elizabeth
VAN BIBBER, Lazarus (1806-1896): m'd [], Martha
NOTE: They were on the Southern Emigrant Route, now commonly known as the Applegate Trail.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THE DISCOVERY OF ALPHONSO BOONE,
SON OF CHLOE VAN BIBBER AND JESSE BRYAN BOONE, GRAVE:
On Sept. 7, 2002 the gravesite of Alphonso Boone received a proper tombstone brought about by the efforts of many caring relatives and friends. Alphonso died in 1850, of the fever, at Long's Bar on the Feather River near Oroville, California while prospecting for gold with his sons.
One hundred and fifty years later the President of the Wilsonville-Boone's Ferry Historical Society, John Smith, in a telephone call to the Historian, Jim Lenhoff of Butte County, was told there was a small cemetery with 5 gravesites but only 4 grave markers.
With research done at the Oregon Historical Research Library it was determined the 5th gravesite was Alphonso as described by two of his sons in letters written after they had returned to Oregon.
Sixteen friends and three generations of grandchildren of Alphonso participated in the ceremony held up in the golden hills above Feather River. The dedication was climaxed by sharing "Dried Apple Fruitcake" a family recipe brought over the Oregon Trail by Alphonso's daughter, Mary Boone Norris.
Source: Arlene Curry Buschert -- 2nd great granddaughter of Alphonso Boone.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Name: VanBeber, James H.
Dates: 1838 - 1912
Service: Union Army
County: Delaware
Cemetery: Elm

Name: Van Bibber, Nathan B.
Dates: 1838 - 1928
Service: Confederate Army
County: Oklahoma
Cemetery: Whisler
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan VAN BIBBER, EWING A., born in Kentucky about 1813, enrolled in Callaway County, Missouri, and mustered in, age 32, at Ft. Leavenworth, June 24, 1846, to serve one year during the war with Mexico as Corporal, Captain Charles B. Rogers' Company H, 1st Missouri Mounted Infantry; the Regiment, under command of Colonel Alexander W. Donipan, left Fort Leavenworth, June 26, and arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 18, 1846; Company H. marched down the Rio Grande and on November 24 arrived at Valverde, the rendezvous for the invasion of Chihuahua; after a fight at Brazito, arrived with other troops at El Paso on December 27, 1846. The expedition under Colonel Doniphan left El Paso February 8, defeated the Mexican Army at the battle of Sacramento, February 28, and arrived at the City of Chihuahua on March 1, 1847; left Chihuahua April 25 and arrived at Parras May 14; marched from there via Saltillo to Camargo on the Rio Grande where he was promoted to Commissary Sergeant on May 29; the Company muster-out roll shows him on detached services from May 30, 1847, to drive horses to Missouri, the Regiment being ordered to take water transportation to New Orleans and thence up the Mississippi to St. Louis.
Came from Colusa County, California, to Arizona, early in 1863, late in October of that year he and Theodore Green Rusk were with Henry Wickenburg when the Vulture mine was first discovered and on November 24 they and three others posted a location notice thereon but nothing further was done; on May 9, 1864, Wickenburg relocated the ledge and proceeded, with the help of four other miners, to take out ore from which gold was extracted by arastras located on the Hassayampa River; Van Bibber was not a party to a law suit in which Judge Joseph P. Allyn decided in October, 1864, that Theodore Green Rusk had acquired no interest in the property but later derived a benefit according to a communication from Prescott printed in the Sacramento Union of April 11, 1866, which reported that Wickenburg had received $25,000 in cash for 300 feet of the Vulture lode and then stated;
There were other persons beside Wickenburg who laid claim to the feet sold, and one of them, Major Van Bibber of Colusa County, received some $10,000 to quit his claim.
The following references to him where printed in the Prescott Arizona Miner:
October 20, 1866 -- Beaver Valley, on Ash creek and southwest from Woolsey's ranch about 18 miles, is likely to be well settled. Among those who have taken up ranches there, and propose to improve them at once, are Messrs. John A. Rush, Major Van Bibber, Dr. Alsap, John M. Boggs, John P. Osborn, Berry Dodson, Theodore Boggs and Wormsley. The climate is much milder than in Prescott, and the soil is very rich.
September 12, 1867 -- A few days since, 64 Indians visited Boggs and Van Bibber's ranch on the Agua Fria and seemed to be very friendly. They are the same whose chiefs were lately at Fort Whipple. On Sunday some Indians stole a mule from Mr. Dickason, at Leonora valley.
September 19, 1867 -- Major Van Bibber, who has been sick nigh unto death, is now past the crisis, and feeling much better. The Major has had a hard time of it, and we hope he soon may be all right again.
Died at Prescott, A.T., October 1, 1867, aged 55; the following is extracted from an obituary published in the Miner:
VAN BIBBER, EWING A.
He was an old resident of California and, was, likewise, a pioneer of Arizona, having come here early in '63. He was always to be found in the van of civilization, and had all the good qualities of the American pioneer. We, who knew his jovial and kind disposition, mourn his loss and will treasure his memory.

Sources of information:

1. Parish, T.E. -- History of Arizona, Phoenix, 1915, Vol. 2, pp. 212-213.
2. Barney, J. M. -- Discovery and Early Working of the Vulture Mine Manuscript, 1942.
3. Arizona Highways, Phoenix, February, 1944, pp. 28-29, "Henry Wickenburg, Soldier of Misfortune.
4. The Probate Court of Yavapai County - Docket No. 24.
5. The Adjutant General of the Army - Military Service Records.
1. The Arizona Miner, Prescott, October 26, 1864, October 20, 1866, 2:1; September 12, 2:1, September 19, 2:2; October 1, 3:1 and October 5, 1867, 3:2 (obituary).
2. The Sacramento Union, April 11, 1866, 3:3.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour
Olive VanBibber and Thomas Ives Fulfer
Thomas "Coon" Ives Fulfer, Jr. and Martha L. Robertson

Miami Cemetery, Roberts Co., Texas
Fulfer, Martha L., Aug. 31, 1871, Jan. 4, 1951, Mother, A0546
Fulfer, Mrs. Olive, 1816, 1913, A0728
Fulfer, Thomas T., Jul. 10, 1868, Oct. 2, 1943, Father, A0546
NOTE: Mrs. Olive Fulfer is evidently Olive Van Bibber, daughter of Peter VanBibber, III and Catherine Ridenour, who married Thomas I. Fulfer with Thomas T. Fulfer as their son and Martha L. as Thomas T.'s wife.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

KNOW YE, That Robert Vanbever, a Sergeant of Company A, Fourth Regiment of Kentucky, Infantry, Volunteers, who was enrolled on the fourteenth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and ninety eight, at Middlesboro, Kentucky, to serve two years was Honorable Discharged from the service of the United States on the twelfth day of February one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, by reason of muster out of the company.
This Certificate is given under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 1, 1902, "to authorize the Secretary of War to furnish certificates in lieu of lost or destroyed discharged," to honorably discharged officer or enlisted man or their widows, upon evidence that the original discharge certificate has been lost or destroyed, and upon the condition imposed by said Act that this certificate "shall not be accepted as a voucher for the payment of any claim against the United States for pay, bounty, or other allowances, or as evidence in any other case."

GIVEN at the WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D.C. this twenty-fifth day of April, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight.
BY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR:
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The term "Relict" on a tombstone means that the woman was a widow at time of death, consort means that her husband survived her.

"Cenotaph" engraved on a tombstone indicates an empty grave, with the stone
erected in honor or memory of a person buried elsewhere - often erected in honor of a person lost at sea.

Meanings of Carvings:
Arches--- Victory in Death
Arrows--- Mortality
Bouquets/Flowers--- Condolences, grief, sorrow
Buds/Rosebud--- Morning of Life or Renewal of Life
Roses--- Brevity of earthly existence
Portals--- Passageway to eternal journey
Bugles--- Resurrection and the Military
Crossed Swords--- High-ranking military person
Flying Birds--- Flight of the Soul
Fruits--- Eternal plenty
Garlands--- Victory in death
Imps--- Mortality
Shells--- Pilgrimage of Life
Thistles--- Remembrance
Tombs--- Mortality
Trees--- Life
Trumpeters--- Heralds of the Resurrection
Willows--- Earthly Sorrow
Morning Glory--- Beginning of Life
Butterfly--- Short-lived; Early Death
Full-Blown Rose--- Prime of Life
Palm Branch--- Signifies Victory and Rejoicing
Ivy--- Friendship and Immortality
Laurel--- Fame or Victory
Oak Leaves & Acorn--- Maturity, Ripe Old Age
Weeping Willow--- Emblem of Sorrow
Corn--- Ripe Old Age
Sheaf of Wheat--- Ripe for Harvest, Divine Harvest, Time
Poppy--- Sleep
Lamb--- Innocence
Dove--- Innocence, Gentleness, Affection, Purity
Cherub--- Angelic
Cross--- Emblem of Faith
Anchor/Ships--- Hope or Seafaring profession
Broken Ring--- Family Circle Severed
Broken Column--- Loss of Head of Family
Torch Inverted--- Life Extinct
Urn with Blaze --- Undying Friendship
Harp--- Praise to the Maker
Handshakes--- Farewell
Hearts--- Soul in Bliss or Love of Christ
Horns--- The Resurrection
Hourglass--- Swiftness of Time
Open Book/Bible--- Deceased Teacher, Minister, etc.
Lily or Lily of Valley--- Emblem of Innocence and Purity
Tree Stump w/Ivy--- Head of Family; Immortality
Urn with /Wreath or Crepe-- Mourning
Stars & Stripes Around Eagle--- Eternal Vigilance, Liberty
Hourglass w/Wings of Time--- Time Flying; Short Life
Candle being Snuffed--- Time, mortality
Coffin, Father Time, Picks/Shovels, Darts--- Mortality
Hand of God Chopping--- Sudden Death
Winged Effigies--- Flight of the Soul
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Nathan Boone Van Bibber, son of David C.R. Van Bibber and Jane (Williams) Van Bibber, was born February 24th, 1838; departed this life August 16th, 1928, age 90 years, 5 months and 23 days.
He was born in Nicholas county, Va., now West Virginia, where he spent all of his youthful days and early manhood. In his father's family there were eight boys and four girls, all of whom preceded him to the Great Beyond, his father and mother also having passed away many years ago.
Nathan Boone Van Bibber was a descendant of a robust, long-lifed people, his ancestors came from Holland and were members of the early colonial settlers west of the Alleghany Mountains; his grand father, Mathias Van Bibber along with other pioneers formed a settlement 60 miles east of Charleston, West Virginia, selecting rich valley lands for farms. In two generations these rugged pioneers had not only made it safe for the white man, but had gone into the forests and the howling wilderness and with a dogged perseverance fell the mighty oak by the sweat of their brow, builded homes, carved out of the forest, fields, waving with golden grain. It is to these pioneers that we, their descendants, owe our greatest debt of gratitude, for their labors, their fight, their ideals ever onward and upward in their march, be it forever said of these fathers and our mothers born of a fearless ancestry, who believed in truth and righteousness and had courage to defend their convictions.
Nathan Boone Van Bibber was untied in marriage to Sarah H. Mayes in the year 1867. To this union was born ten children, three of whom with their mother preceded him to the flower clad hills of glory.
After the death of his first wife he was again, in 1918, united in marriage to Mrs. Isabell Thorn. His last marriage was a great comfort to him in his declining days. He leaves to mourn their loss, his last wife, two sons and five daughters, seventeen grand children, besides these he leaves a host of relatives and friends to mourn his absence.
He was a Civil War veteran, belonging to the 22nd regiment of West Virginia Confederate Volunteers.
He came with his family to Oklahoma in 1900 and has since that date lived on a farm seven miles west of Edmond. In his early manhood he professed faith in Christ and was baptized into the fellowship of the Baptist Church, remaining a member to the time of his death. He was a staunch believer in the Bible and the Christian religion, read his bible much. Few bible students were more familiar with God's Word than Nathan Boone Van Bibber. The day and night preceding his earthly departure he said, over and over again, "I am going home." A large crowd attended the funeral and the lavish display of the floral offerings placed on the casket and the racks at the funeral services attested the popularity and esteem in which the deceased was held. Funeral services were conducted from the Hopewell church by Rev. L. W. Marks. Singing was conducted by Elsie Ritter, Mrs. Ralph Gilmore, Mrs. Roxie Watts, Shelden Davenport and Elisha Larkin.
His remains were laid to rest in the Whisler cemetery.

"Father, I will that they also, whom Thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which Thou gavest me."

The Edmond Sun, Edmond, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma -- Thursday -- August 30, 1928.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Jesse (John) Van Bebber was born August 8 1759, Pigg River, Halifax (Pittsylvania) County, Virginia. He was a son of Peter and Margery (Bounds) Van Bebber Jr. The family removed to Botetourt (Greenbrier) County, West Virginia, after 1769, where his father built a blockhouse, on Wolfe Creek. The blockhouse was located near the James Graham Family, now in Summers County, West Virginia. They remained here until about 1781, when the family removed to the western frontier, settling at now Point Pleasant, on the Ohio River. Records for the family can be found in Augusta and Botetourt Counties, Virginia, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Mason Counties, West Virginia. The Augusta County records show that the Van Bebbers, defended the Lewis Settlement, at Point Pleasant, with the promise of a city lot, if they continued to do so. Jesse Van Bebber married Rachel Greenlee, a daughter of Alexander and Anna (Henry) Greenlee, in 1799, in Gallia Township, Washington (now Gallia) County, Ohio. They had a son Isaac Van Bebber, who died young, and a daughter, Elizabeth, who married (1) Joseph Smith and (2) Richard Tillis.
Several records are found in for Jesse Van Bebber in Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Mason Counties, where he appeared in Court as a witness, jury duty, and surveyor of roads. In the, "Annals of Fort Lee," by Roy Bird Cook, he wrote that, "Jesse, James, Matthias Van Bibber, brothers, and their cousin Isaac Van Bibber, Jr, set out in a canoe for the Mouth of Elk (River at Charleston). On their way back to Point Pleasant, they
stopped overnight at Fort Tackett, (located at now St. Albans), not knowing that the Indians were in waiting to destroy the fort, after they left the fort next day.
Mason County Court Order Book, Dec 5 1818, application of Jonas Smith, for a road to Jesse Van Bebber's on the Rocky Fork Road of Thirteen Mile Creek, and thence to the Public Road on the N. E. bank of the Great Kanawha, near Edward Greenlee. Mason County Court, Oct 19 1819, a road from the Court House to Van Bibber's Bridge (Thirteen Mile Creek). In 1797, Kanawha County Court Record Book, Jesse Van Bebber, and his brother, James, were granted Letters of Administration for their father's estate. His father, Peter Van Bebber, died on Oct 10 1796, at Point Pleasant.
Jesse Van Bebber, served in the Kanawha County Rangers, under command of Hugh Caperton. In the late 1700s, the Rangers served up and down the Kanawha Valley, protecting the settler's from Indian attack. When Fort Lee (Charleston), was founded, the Rangers were hired as scouts and messengers. A Ranger, was the last man to be killed by Indians, in Kanawha Valley. Jesse, was appointed Captain in the Virginia Militia, and served until 1808, when he resigned his commission. He owned a farm at the Mouth of
Thirteen Mile Creek, Van Bibber, (now Union) District, Mason County, where he died on April 10 1852. His widow Rachel (Greenlee) Van Bebber, received a pension for his services from the State of Virginia. She lived with her daughter, Elizabeth Tillis, till her death. Jesse and Rachel Van Bebber and their son, Isaac, were buried in Van Bebber-Smith Cemetery, on his farm, the cemetery is now destroyed. A NSDAR Marker was place on his grave for his services in the 1774, Battle of Point Pleasant, serving in the Southern Division, under Col. Charles Lewis.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Salathial/Salathiel MARTIN
Captain in a Militia of the Rev. War in NC
B. Aug 23, 1763 in NC
M. Apr 23, 1782 in Surry County, NC, by William COOK, Esqr.
D. May 6, 1827 in Claiborne County, TN.
Wife: Mary COOK
B. About 1764 in VA
D. Mar 3, 1858 in Claiborne County, TN.

Children:
1. David MARTIN
B. March 1783 in NC

2. Thomas MARTIN
B. Feb 29, 1785? in NC

3. Elizabeth MARTIN
B. Mar 29, 17__? in NC
Elizabeth is thought to be deceased before her
1833, as she is not named as an heir in the estate settlement of her father.

4. George Washington MARTIN
B. Feb 11, 1789 in NC

5. William MARTIN
B. FEb , 1791 in NC

6. Nancy MARTIN
B. May 12, 1793 in NC
Spouse: John SHUMATE
B. ca 1787 in VA

7. Mary MARTIN
B. Apr 9, 1795 in TN.
MD. ca 1816 in Claiborne Co., TN.
D. ca 1838 in Claiborne Co., TN.
Spouse: Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire, son of
John VAN BEBBER, Sr., Esquire and Margaret
Chrisman.
B. April 30, 1790 in Russell Co., (now Lee Co.) VA.
D. 1866 in Claiborne Co., TN.

8. James C. MARTIN
B. 1796 in TN.

9. Wilson W. MARTIN
B. Jun 17, _____

10. Robert MARTIN
B. UNKNOWN

11. Jefferson MARTIN
B. UNKNOWN
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Located near intersection of RUSSELL Lane and Back Valley Road in Powell Valley; Speedwell, Claiborne County, Tennessee.
John M. VAN BEBBER
B. Oct 25, 1819
D. Mar 11, 1865
Manerva Jane VAN BEBBER
B. June 27, 1824
D. Apr 10, 1856
Dorcas BUCHANAN
B. July 6, 1838
D. Feb 23, 1859
Hester A. KINCAID
B. Feb 1, 1837
D. Apr 1, 1837
S. C. KINCAID
B. May 5, 1826
D. April 1865
William KINCAID
B. Jan 22, 1798
D. Apr 3, 1855
Susan KINCAID
B. Apr 1, 1807
D. May 10, 1880
John M. VAN BEBBER. John married Manerva Jane KINCAID, the daughter of William Harrison KINCAID and Susan WILSON, also buried here in this KINCAID Cemetery, located by the Anti-bellum home of the KINCAID family. Also buried here were other KINCAID Children of the KINCAID's.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber, Anna, born 2 Jan. 1723 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Catherine, born 17 Apr. 1721 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Christiana, born 18 Sept. 1711 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Christiana, buried 4 Sept. 1711 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Christina, born 15 Aug. 1698 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Elizabeth, born 18 Dec. 1708 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, George, in Court 24 Mar. 1900 - Cecil Democrat.
Van Bibber, Haybartues, born 22 July 1729 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Hendrick, married no date - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Henry, born 13 Jan. 1730 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Henry, born Nov. 1725 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Hester, born 9 May 1693 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Isaac, married 27 Nov. 1768 - Vestry Proceedings St. Mary Ann's Parish.
Van Bibber, Isaac, paid property tax 1807 - Cecil County Assessments, South Milford.
Van Bibber, Jacob, 26 Oct. 1692 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Jacob, 2 Feb. 1706 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Jacob, 1 July 1731 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Jacob, buried Sept. 1705 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, James, married 17?0 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Matthias, had a Forest 16 Jan. 1886 - Cecil Democrat.
Van Bibber, Matthias, born 30 Sept. 1729 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Matthias, married 7 Nov. 1705 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Peter, born 25 May 1695 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Register of Marriages, Births, and Burials Vol. I - North Sassafras parish: St. Stephen Church
Jacob Van Bebber Senr. of Bohemia River was buryed on 2 Day of Sept. A. D. MDCCV
Christiana Van Bebber Wife of Jacob Van Bebber Senr. of Bohemia River was buryed on fourth Day of Sept. A. D. MDCCXI
Matthias Van Bebber and Haramiahie, Daughter of Adam Peterson of Newcaffle and Gorrisburg Pennsylvania was married by license on the seventh day of November A. D. MDCCVII
James Van Bebber Son of Henerich Van Bebber of the City of Utrecht of Holland was marryed to Anna Laroun in the year 1720
Peter V Bebber Son of Jacob V Bebber and Fronika his Wife was born on 25 Day of May A> D. 1695
Christina Daughter of Jacob V Bebber and Fronika his Wife was born on 15th Day of August A. D. 1698
Catherine Van Bebber Daughter of James Van Bebber and Anna his wife was Born the 17 Day of April 1722
Anna Van Bebber daughter of Ditto [James and Anna] was Born the 2nd Day of January 1723
Henry Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] Born Nov. 1725
Haybartus Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] was Born the 22 Day of July 1729
Jacob Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] was Born the 1st Day of July 1731
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan These records came from the Nicholas County, WV courthouse at Summersville, WV


David Van Bibber
born: 25 Oct 1856
where: Peters Creek
parents: Moses H. Van Bibber and Joannah

Joseph Van Bibber
born: 12 April 1858
parents: Moses and Joannah Van Bibber

Nancy J. Van Bibber
born: 19 May 1858
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber

John W. Van Bibber
born: 5 Sept 1861
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber

Ogden Roberts Van Bibber
parents: Moses H. and Joanna Van Bibber

Lucy Belle Van Bibber
born: 29 July 1865
parents: John Campbell and Malinda Van Bibber

Theodora Van Bibber
born: 25 Sept 1866
parents: John C. and Malinda Van Bibber

Ulyseus G. Van Bibber
born: 25 May 1872
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Eugenia Van Bibber
born: 9 Oct 1874
parents: Nathan B. Van Bibber and Sarah H. Van Bibber

William Van Bibber
born: Sept 1874
parents: John C. and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Ira Van Bibber
born: 24 May 1876
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Ira Van Bibber
born: 15 May 1877
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda Taylor Van Bibber

George Washington Van Bibber
born: 20 May 1878
parents: Malinda C. Van Bibber

Van Bibber Deaths

Rebecca Ann Van Bibber
died: March 1853
cause: droopsy
where: Peters Creek
age: 27 years
parents: William H. Hanna
location of birth: Greenbrier County
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband

Elizabeth M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
cause: consumption
age: 14 yrs.
parents: D.C. and Jane Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: D.C. Van Bibber

Mary M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
age: 4 yrs.
parents: Mathew Van Bibber and Nancy
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Mathew Van Bibber, father

Major Van Bibber
died: 25 Nov 1868
age: 3 months
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John Van Bibber

Jane Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1872
age: 68 yrs.
cause: old age
parents: Hugh and Jane Williams
informant: David Van Bibber, husband

Annie R. Van Bibber
died: 7 Sept 1878
cause: diptheria
age: 8 yrs
parents: J.C. Van Bibber and M.C. Van Bibber
location of birth: Nicholas County
informant: J.C. Van Bibber, father

Obed Van Bibber
died: 3 June 1881
cause: pneumonia
age: 1 yr.
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Malinda Van Bibber, mother

Margaret Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1886
age: 61 yrs.
parents: Joshua and Nancy Stephen
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband

Jesse Van Bibber (female)
died: 10 Nov 1886
cause: flu
age: 3 yrs.
parents: Jonathan and M. Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John C. Van Bibber, father

J.J. Van Bibber
died: Sept 1902
age: 11 months
where: Gad
cause: brain disease

Mathias Van Bibber
died: 6 Feb 1902
age: 77 years
cause: stomach disease
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan George Van Bibber – 24 May 1879 – 16 Sept. 1961
Jackie Van Bibber – 24 Dec. 1901 – 11 Sept. 1902
Lemma Van Bibber – 15 Oct. 1881 – 24 Mar. 1963
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Harriet Van Bibber was born in Kentucky in 1845. She was the daughter of Cyrus Van Bibber and Mary S. Timberlake Van Bibber. On August 31, 1865 she married Richard Landrum Burchett in Greenup County, Kentucky.
Landrum Burchett was born on January 21, 1841 in Floyd County, Kentucky, the son of William J. Burchett and Frances Emily Auxier Burchett. Landrum was raised on a farm in Floyd County, Kentucky and in his youth he was employed as a clerk in a mercantile store. When the Civil War broke out, he was surrounded by friends and neighbors who were in sympathy with the
Confederacy. The Auxier family were strong Unionists and Landrum enlisted as a private with Company A of the 39th Kentucky Infantry. He was involved in several skirmishes and slightly wounded. In 1865 he was mustered out with the rank of Second Lieutenant.
While visiting his Grandmother Auxier's family in Greenup County, he met Harriet Van Bibber and they moved to Mason City, Illinois shortly after their wedding. In Mason City, Landrum was employed as a clerk. They later moved to New Holland, Illinois where he formed a partnership with G.W. LaForge and established the first mercantile business in New Holland.
Landrum also served as postmaster of New Holland holding the office until November 4, 1885. On March 14, 1885, a disastrous fire destroyed the town of New Holland and the store of Burchett and Company was completely destroyed. At the urging of their friends, Landrum and Harriet immediately telegraphed for new goods and on March 16 they resumed business. During the summer of 1885 they built the first brick building in New Holland on the old store site.
Landrum and Harriet were the oldest settlers in New Holland and were prominent citizens of central Illinois. Richard Landrum Burchett died on April 13, 1907 and Harriet Van Bibber Burchett died the same year. They are buried in Richmond Grove Cemetery in New Holland, Illinois. They were the parents of one son, Oscar Burchett.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Private Arling C. Van Bibber Son of George and Elizabeth Van Bibber, born at Savanna, Illinois July 7, 1893.
Volunteered for service at Miles City, Montana and was sent overseas with Co. E. 163rd Infantry, transferred to Co. C. 16th Infantry, 1st Division. Took part in the offensives at Cantigny, Soissons and Marne counter-offensives, later in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensive. Killed in action in the Argonne Forest, October 8, 1918.

Private Herbert Van Bibber Son of George and Elizabeth Van Bibber, born at Savanna, Illinois September 1899.
Volunteered for service at Cleveland, Ohio October 17, 1917. Served overseas 11 months with 476 Aeor Squadron.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan "Ship Passenger Lists" 1641-1825, Carl Boyer, 3rd, 1980. P 7, "Einwanderder in Pennsylvania Vor 1700", Jahruch fur (two dots over the u) Auslanddeutsche Sippenkunde, I (1936), 53-54 {Lancour No. 116].
Bebber Van, Jakob Isaaks, Backer (dots over the a) aus Krefeld, 1687.
Bebber Van, Jakob Isaaks und Matthias, sohne (dots over o) des vorigen, 1684 und 1687.
P 8 Schumacher, Peter, von Kriegsheim, 1685 mit 7 kindern und einer Verwandten.
Translated, last two words, one relative.
It reads: Schumacher, Peter, from Kriegsheim, with 7 children and one relation (relative). (Not a Frau, wife, as entered on others listed). In my German and English Dictionary I find the V is a B, Berwanbt means relative, kin.
P 8 Schumacher, Sarah, Von Kriegsheim, mit 7 kindern, vor 1689. This is widow of George Schumacher, who died enroute to Pennsylvania, 1689. Sister-in-law to Peter Schumacher, above. See, Genealogy of the Shoemaker Family of Cheltenham Pennsylvania, Benjamin D. Shoemaker.
(Descendants of George and Sarah Schumacher), Introduction & Historical Notes, p 6 reference, The Pennsylvania Magazine, Vol. 8, p 337, in a list of families who arrived in Philadelphia 1682-1687, has Sarah, his cousin.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The name VAN BEBBER means simply "from Bebber." I have never located a town named Bebber in The Netherlands, though it might actually exist in Germany and now called something else. Bebber is the original--not Bibber. Van Bebber was not originally a surname, since most commoners were known by their patronymics: Isaacs, Jacobs, Peters, Hendricks, Dericks, Lenarts, Hermanns, Martins, Johans, Friedrichs, Andrews, Arnolds, Willems, Gerrits, Richards, Barents, Roelofs, Mathis, etc. Only when the family became more prominent and owned estates, I believe, did they assume the family name Van Bebber.
When did this occur? Since there are few records that I know of in which Van Bebbers are listed as a surname prior to their migration to Krefeld in the Palatinate, I would surmise that the name evolved in the mid-17th century or slightly earlier. Prior to that, the name was probably like one of those listed above. There is a town called Bebber am Deister, formerly known as Bedebur. Also, it could derive from the German word BEBER (which I have seen in American sources as a misspelling), which means BEAVER. So, it could simply mean "one who dwells by the beaver dam" or something like that. Could be "one who dwells by the sign of the beaver" if the early family were merchants and this were their logo, was usually done for innkeepers and merchants.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The Van Bibber family that was the first to settle in the New World was the family of Isaacs Jacob Van Bibber who came to Philadelphia in 1687. He came to America to prepare the way for his parents and the rest of the family that would soon follow. The Van Bibbers were residents of Krefeld (now Germany) and had been persecuted in Europe because they were followers of Menno Simons. Other Mennonites from Krefeld had come to Philadelphia in 1684 at the invitation of William Penn including Herman op den Graff, who was the husband of two of the sisters of Isaacs Jacob. Isaacs Jacob Van Bibber moved to Germantown (now a suburb of Philadelphia) and was engaged in commerce.
It was not long before the rest of the family immigrated to Germantown and resided there and in Philadelphia until moving to Cecil County Maryland. While in Germantown the family got involved in a religious dispute and perhaps that is what caused the migration to Maryland. Below you will find a family group sheet of the first known family of Van Bibbers in America.

Jacob Isaac Van Bibber, b. ca. 1640, d. Sept. 1705, Cecil Co., MD
m. Christina Unknown, b. ca. 1640, d. 4 Sept. 1711, Cecil Co., MD
Jacob Isaac and Christina Van Bibber are buried in the floor of St. Stephen's Church in Earlsville, Maryland.

Deborah Van Bibber, b. ca. 1660, d. ???
m. (1) Herman op den Graff
m. (2) Dirk Keyser, aft 1704
Henry Van Bibber, b. ??? d. Aft 1729, Cecil Co., MD
m. Catherine Bougard
Lisbet Isaacs Van Bibber
m. Herman op den Graff
Margaryte Van Bibber
m. J. Bool
Matthias Jacobs Van Bibber
m. Hermana Peterson
m. 7 Nov. 1705, Cecil Co., MD
Isaac Jacob Van Bibber, b. ca. 1661, d. 1722/23
m. Fronica/Veronica "Frances" Schumacher, daughter of Peter and Sarah Hendricks) Schumacher.
m. 28 May 1690, Maryland
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan ASH GROVE -- It's already recognized on the state and national registers of historical places, but Thursday the Nathan Boone home near Ash Grove received an honor a little bit closer to home. The home built in 1837 by the youngest son of pioneer Daniel Boone, was the recipient of a historical marker given by the Greene County Historical Sites Board.
The log cabin, about two miles north of Ash Grove, is now owned by the Gayer Dixon family of Ash Grove. It served as home for the Nathan Boone family until his death in 1856. The Dixon family maintains the home while financing is sought to preserve and restore it. "However, Lipscomb said, much of the history behind the home involves the man and his activities before he settled in Greene County. "It's not only the age of the site but the fact that Nathan Boone was important in the early development of not only Greene County but of southeast Missouri," Lipscomb said. "He actually made a lot of contributions to the development of the entire West."
Boone was born in Kentucky in 1781. When he was 18, he married a girl from what is not St. Charles. Although generally overshadowed by his famous father, Daniel, in the story books, Nathan was also a genuine hero and pioneer, Lipscomb said. Along with a brother, he established the Boone's Lick salt works in central Missouri, which is now a state park. He was one of the original surveyors of Iowa, and one Iowa town is names for him.
Boone was also a member of the military, Lipscomb said. He retired as a U.S. lieutenant colonel after leading the U.S. mounted rangers in the Blackhawk War, assisting in the capture of Santa Fe, and serving as the military governor of New Mexico and Texas.
Boone also was an explorer. He helped determine the boundary between the Creek and Cherokee Indian nations. In 1808, he guided William Clark to what is now Independence, where the two helped establish Fort Osage. The fort, now restored, was a frontier outpost, of great importance.
Boone apparently selected the Ozarks as his final home because he was struck by its beauty. The 149 year-old home is now open only once a year, during the fall Nathan Boone Rendezvous. At the festival, begun only last year, relatives of Boone from across the country gathered in Ash Grove for three days of historical celebrations.
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John Donnelly Van Bibber ­was born in Bluegrass, Iowa and he died in 1945. His father was James Robinson Van Bibber and was born in (West) Virginia, possibly Kanawha County. He fought for the South in the Civil War ­ was captured by the North and put in jail in Gallipolis, Ohio across the river from Wheeling, WV. He alerted people during a fire in the jail and was given the opportunity to be freed (for his heroism) if he'd fight for the North. After the war, his family wouldn't take him back, so he took off towards the west. (this is all taken straight from my mother's stories, so I'm not sure where history has been embellished) He took a barge loaded with whiskey up the Ohio River then up the Missouri and just outside Omaha it was shipwrecked. He started walking back home (east) working as a tile­ditcher along the way. He got as far as Moscow, Iowa where he met Emma Jane Nellis, got married and went to Bluegrass, Iowa (Scott County). Apparently he was cited for helping to drain all of that county. Being a veteran, he and his wife later moved to Marshalltown, Iowa to the "old soldier's home" and that's where they are buried.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Joseph Reynolds

1731, 26 December - A son, Johannes; Sponsors: John Reynoldts Senior, and his wife Bridgitte and Peter van Beber - 1732, 20 May [S]
1733, 14 August - A daughter, Sarah; Sponsors: John Reynolds Junior, Wabell Bird and Elizabeth Burney - 1733, 10 October [S]
1735, 27 April - A daughter, Bridgitte; Sponsors: Peter van Beber and his wife Anna, Elizabeth Burney - 1735, 7 October [S]
1737, 28 April - A daughter, Anne; Sponsors: John Reynolds, Anne van Beber, and Anne Evans - 1737, 12 May [S]
1738, 9 December - A daughter , Margaretha; Sponsors: John Reynolds Senior, Bridgitte and Anne van Beber - 1738, 11 December [S]

Peter van Beber

1732, 9 January - A son, Peter; Sponsors: Peter van Burglean, John Reynolds Senior and his wife Bridgitte - 1732, 20 May [S]
1734, in January - A son John; Sponsors: Jospeh Reynolds and hiswife, Sarah and Thomas Anderson - 1735, 7 October [S]
1736, 19 September - A daughter, Anne; Sponsors: John Reynolds, Sarah Reynolds and Anne Evans - 1737, 12 May [S]
1738, 2 November - A daughter, Margaretha; Sponsors: John Reynolds Senior and hiswife Bridgitte and Sarah Reynolds - 1738, 11 December [S]
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Andrew Jackson VanBibber
KNOW YE, That Andrew J. Van Bibber a 3d Sergeant of Captain Charles Cresswel's Company F, Fourth Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, who was mustered on the Second day of June one thousand eight hundred and forty seven to serve during the war with Mexico, is hereby HONORABLY DISCHARGED from the service of the United States, this twenty second day of July 1848, at Cincinnati, Ohio by reason of being mustered out of the service on the expiration of his term.
Said Andrew J. Van Bibber was born in Harrison County in the State of Ohio is thirty four years of age, five feet 6 ½ inches high, dark complexion, black eyes, grey hair, and by occupation, when enlisted, a cooper.
GIVEN at Cincinnati this 22d day of July 1848.
Charles Cresswell, Capt.
Commanding Company.
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John Harrison VAN BEBBER (or VAN BIBBER),
B. January 17,1830 in St. Charles County, MO. He was five feet, five inches tall and had blue eyes and red hair. ; m/1 24 Sep 1853 (divorced) in Lancaster Pct, Clark Co., WA to Rhoda Ruth JOHN, d/o Jacob JOHN and Rachel WHITAKER, b 20 Feb 1839, Danville, Vermilion Co., IL, d 13 Jan 1901, Woodland, Cowlitz, WA, bur IOOF Cemetery, Woodland, Cowlitz, WA; allegedly m/2 to Marinda YOUNGER of MO, sister of Cole YOUNGER.
Children of John and Rhoda:
1. Francis Marion (Frank) VAN BEBBER, b 1854, WA; m 1876 at Martin's Bluff, Cowlitz Co, WA to Zerelda STEWART
2. Emma Teresa VAN BEBBER, b 1857, OR; d 1928, Woodland, Cowlitz Co., WA; m 1883 to Sam CONRAD
3. Edith Bell VAN BEBBER, b 1859, Lewis River, Clark Co., WA; m Norman MERRILL
4. Ida Eleanora VAN BEBBER, b 1862, Lewis River, Clark Co., WA; m R. A. PARENT M.D.

Notes on John Harrison VAN BEBBER
HISTORY: Fields of Flowers and Forests of Firs, Woodland History Committee, published May 13, 1958, p. 227; copy provided by Lois Kullberg, Aug 1995: "John Henry Van Bebber of New York Dutch stock appears to have arrived on Lewis River with the earliest settlers. In 1853 or 54 he married Rhoda John and four children resulted from this union".

"For some reason, not passed on down the family history, John Henry disappeared. Probably the quiet Lewis River scene palled and he struck out for greener pastures. He must have been a reader of Captain Kidd and Jesse James stories and maybe he helped create the Jesse James legend. Anyway thru the mist of fact and fiction as related by his grandson Lloyd. He and some others outfitted a ship in San Francisco and were about ready to put to sea when grandfather was tipped off that the U. S. Government was preparing to arrest the entire crew as pirates. He beat the law to Mexico and I don't believe ever came back till after Grandmother Rhoda got a divorce in 1862, granted by the Washington Legislature. C. C. Bozarth was a member of the Legislature at that time and secured the passage of the bill that authorized the divorce." (Chris and Rhoda were married the following year.) Lloyd continues, "Later Grandfather was associated with the James boys, Jesse and Frank in Missouri and married Marinda Younger, full sister of Cole Younger, who is credited with being the brains of the James Boys gang. I remember my father saying that his father was the fastest and best shot with a rifle or revolver he had ever seen."
HISTORY: "Clark County Pioneers, A Centennial Salute," p. 135. [This account gives his middle name as Harrison not Henry, and says he was born in Louisiana of New York Dutch heritage.] He filed for Donation Land Claim of 314.36 acres in Twp. 5N, R 1E., Sec. 10 & 15 on the Lewis River in Clark County on October 6, 1853....He abandoned the property in the spring of 1854 and the claim was canceled by the Land Office. He and his wife separated and he eventually went to Nevada.
MORE NOTES:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Notes on Francis Marion (Frank) VAN BEBBER
From "Clark County Pioneers: A Centennial Salute", by Clark Co. Genealogical Society, SLC FHL 979.786/H2c, profile of Francis "Frank" Marion Van Bebber, p 135:
Francis "Frank" Marion Van Bebber grew up in Clark County just across the Lewis River from Woodland. He attended school about three months each year, first in a log schoolhouse to which he walked six miles each way and he played alto horn in the Woodland band. He worked on his step-father's farm until he was about nineteen years old and then in 1875 struck out on his own, working in the mines in Idaho for one year. He returned home for a short time and then joined his father working in the woods near Sumner, Washington, and also working in the mills in Pierce County for about three
years. Again he returned home and worked in his step-father's store in Woodland and also farmed.
"He married Zerelda Stewart from Ohio in 1876, daughter of C.H. and Clara Stewart of Martin's Bluff. In 1881 they went to Spokane and pioneered on a homestead 30 miles north of the city. While Frank proved up his claim he worked on the railroad and they remained in the area for eight years. Over the years Frank almost completed a road from his homestead to the town of Spokane. He joined the Masons at Spokane in 1890 and later belonged to the lodge at Tacoma. He was also a member of the Odd Fellows and both he and his wife were members of the Order of Eastern Star.
"In 1892 Frank once again returned home and clerked in his step-father's store. He then went to Alaska where he lived for a period of twelve years. On his first trip to the Klondike he traveled over the Dyea Trail and shot the rapids at White Horse. For a time he acted as a pilot taking other boats through the dangerous rapids. He came away with a tidy sum and was
able to pay off his debts and invested in property. He returned to Alaska the following year and while at Nome he hauled freight for several years and was superintendent of dredging at the Three Friends Mine for four years. In 1909 he left Alaska and moved to Portland, Oregon where he became partners in the establishment of Leisure and Van Bebber, dealers in stirrups and saddles. During the ten years he stayed in Portland he spent part of each year at his ranch in Spokane. In 1919 he bought his step-father's home and moved to Woodland.
HISTORY: Fields of Flowers and Forests of Firs, Woodland History Committee, published May 13, 1958, p. 227-228, from Lois Kullberg:
"Frank worked in his step-father's (C. C. Bozarth's) store - did prospecting around Mt. St. Helens in 1894 and 95 but this venture did not pan out. In 1882 he and his brother-in-law Jake Stewart took up homesteads 30 miles North of Spokane. They were poor and lived mostly on venison. (Frank like his father was a good shot.) In 1896 Frank made his first trip to the Klondike over the Dyea Trail or Chillcot pass. Quoting Lloyd again, "He (Frank) put his scow together with 5 Swedes at Lake Lindeman and was the first man in the party to shoot White Horse Rapids. He took 50 other boats through the rapids, as pilot for 50 or 150 dollars depending on the size of the boat. He was practically broke at Dyea but landed at Dawson with his entire outfit weighing about one ton and a trained team of 7 shepard (sic) dogs. He staked out some good claims and made a fair cleanup. (He) came back to Woodland in the fall with enough to clean up his debts and leave him a tidy sum, most of which he invested in property. He returned the next year to find that during his absence his claims had been taken over by Sharpers and worked out. He prospected, worked claims, etc. till steamboats appeared on the Yukon at which time he worked on the boats, mostly as pilot. Later he went to Nome when they had the Beach strike".
He was foreman on the first dredge operated on Salmon River or anywhere in Alaska. Lloyd just returned from the sea, became fireman. Frank had the reputation of being the only one from this vicinity coming back with a full poke.
Notes on Ida Eleanora VAN BEBBER
Adopted by step-father, Christopher Columbus "C.C." BOZOROTH
Jul 31, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Spouse DOM County
Francis M. VanBebber Ida Jeffery 10 May 1895 Cowley
Charles E. VanBebber Ora M. Wall 23 Apr 1929 Doniphan
James C. VanBebber Ella C. Blair 31 May 1919 Doniphan
Rufus E. VanBebber Julia Austin 09 Nov 1904 Doniphan
William R. VanBebber Dale M. Clark 23 Jan 1917 Doniphan
Charles E. VanBebber Nellie A. Waterman 01 Nov 1903 Labette
Laurel R. VanBebber Zola F. Gallentine 02 Jan 1920 Norton
John W. VanBibber Mary L. Taylor 04 Aug 1890 Reno
Ulyssus S. VanBebber Lillian Holmes 18 Apr 1894 Reno
Harry G. VanBebber Bernice M. Moore 16 Nov 1904 Wilson
Guy R. VanBebber Odessa Stringer 05 May 1909 Woodson
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan MARRIAGES:

Van Bibber Spouse DOM County

A. D.. VanBibber
Mary Ann Bryant
23 Jan 1866 Nicholas

Emma VanBibber
Abraham Ellison Sebert
27 Jan 1859 Nicholas

Felicity B. Van Bibber
Presley V. Nebergall
16 Jan 1890 Nicholas

J. F. VanBibber
Arabella Drake
10 Sept 1885 Clay

John C.R. Van Bibber
Catherine Taylor
18 May 1865 Nicholas

Lucy Belle VanBibber
James Robert Brown
22 Dec 1884 Nicholas

Margaret F. VanBibber
James Burnes
02 Apr 1885 Nicholas

Mathias VanBibber
Sarah Taylor
01 Nov 1897 Nicholas

Nancy VanBibber
David Stephen Young
17 Feb 1892 Nicholas

Nathan B. Van Bibber
Sarah/Mariah H. Mays
17 Dec1866 Nicholas

Olive B. Van Bibber
Robert Keenan
05 Feb 1824 Nicholas
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VAN BIBBER BIRTHS:

These records came from the Nicholas County, WV courthouse at Summersville, WV,

David Van Bibber
born: 25 Oct 1856
where: Peters Creek
parents: Moses H. Van Bibber and Joannah

Joseph Van Bibber
born: 12 April 1858
parents: Moses and Joannah Van Bibber

Nancy J. Van Bibber
born: 19 May 1858
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber

John W. Van Bibber
born: 5 Sept 1861
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber

Ogden Roberts Van Bibber
parents: Moses H. and Joanna Van Bibber

Lucy Belle Van Bibber
born: 29 July 1865
parents: John Campbell and Malinda Van Bibber

Theodora Van Bibber
born: 25 Sept 1866
parents: John C. and Malinda Van Bibber

Ulyseus G. Van Bibber
born: 25 May 1872
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Eugenia Van Bibber
born: 9 Oct 1874
parents: Nathan B. Van Bibber and Sarah H. Van Bibber

William Van Bibber
born: Sept 1874
parents: John C. and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Ira Van Bibber
born: 24 May 1876
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda C. Van Bibber

Ira Van Bibber
born: 15 May 1877
parents: John C. Van Bibber and Malinda Taylor Van Bibber

George Washington Van Bibber
born: 20 May 1878
parents: Malinda C. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DEATHS:

Rebecca Ann Van Bibber
died: March 1853
cause: droopsy
where: Peters Creek
age: 27 years
parents: William H. Hanna
location of birth: Greenbrier County
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband

Elizabeth M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
cause: consumption
age: 14 yrs.
parents: D.C. and Jane Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: D.C. Van Bibber

Mary M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
age: 4 yrs.
parents: Mathew Van Bibber and Nancy
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Mathew Van Bibber, father

Major Van Bibber
died: 25 Nov 1868
age: 3 months
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John Van Bibber

Jane Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1872
age: 68 yrs.
cause: old age
parents: Hugh and Jane Williams
informant: David Van Bibber, husband

Annie R. Van Bibber
died: 7 Sept 1878
cause: diptheria
age: 8 yrs
parents: J.C. Van Bibber and M.C. Van Bibber
location of birth: Nicholas County
informant: J.C. Van Bibber, father

Obed Van Bibber
died: 3 June 1881
cause: pneumonia
age: 1 yr.
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Malinda Van Bibber, mother

Margaret Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1886
age: 61 yrs.
parents: Joshua and Nancy Stephen
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband

Jesse Van Bibber (female)
died: 10 Nov 1886
cause: flu
age: 3 yrs.
parents: Jonathan and M. Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John C. Van Bibber, father

J.J. Van Bibber
died: Sept 1902
age: 11 months
where: Gad
cause: brain disease

Mathias Van Bibber
died: 6 Feb 1902
age: 77 years
cause: stomach disease
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan LAZARUS VANBEBER — Among the many pioneers of Benton County, there are none more highly respected than this early argonaut of King’s Valley, having arrived in that beautiful place where the whole valley lay in its virginity and the feet of white man had hardly tread upon it —— his was among the first to press it. Mr. Vanbeber was born in Clayton county, Tennessee, February 27, 1807. At the age of twenty-one years he emigrated to Illinois, where he followed farming until the spring of 1846, when, with his family and mule teams, he crossed the plains to Oregon, and to Benton County, taking up his donation claim in King’s Valley, where Morris Allen, now lives. He now owns a farm of three hundred and fifty acres in the south end of the valley where he now resides.

Benton County, Kings Valley Cemetery
VANBIBER, Martha, wife of L. Vanbiber, d Nov 3, 1883; 26 yrs 8 mo.
VANBEBBER, Lazarus, Feb 27, 1802
ANOTHER ACCOUNT:
Lazarus VanBebber, b 1807, was a son of Peter and Ellender Van Bebber. Martha, b 1805, was a daughter of James Vanbebber and Hannah Hoover. They were first cousins, both being born in Claiborne Co., TN. They lived in Macoupin Co., IL where their daughter, Almeda was born. In 1846 they valiantly headed for Oregon. It was not an easy trip and they left those following the Oregon Trail at the point where the California broke off. Then Jesse Applegate met them and said there was an easier route below Klamath Falls, OR that would get them there easier but it was not. We visited an Interpretive Center just past Grant's Pass which a brother and sister had worked on for 7 years. It was a dream of theirs and the brother built the center and they both made a short movie with local people acting the parts and explaining how rough the trail was. Signs, artifacts and dioramas covered 4000 square feet within the building. What a history lesson we learned. Lazarus and Martha continued up to Benton and King's Valley where they laid out a claim, recorded in Benton Co. records as OR Donation Land claim #5129.
Almeda married Isaac King and had 9 children. Isaac died under mysterious circumstances as revealed by a newspaper clipping. Then she married Andrew Jackson Zumwalt and had 4 more children.
Every year there is a King's Valley Reunion the Saturday after Father's Day in King's Valley. If anyone is related or would like more information I would be happy to share my holdings.
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John Van Bibber’s Gravestone:
Evergreen Cemetery
Rounded at the top, the stone depicts clasped hands above a draped shield with the words: Sacred to the memory of. Below in large bold raised letters is the name, John Van Bibber. Underneath the name is carved, "a Texas Veteran. Born March 12, 1797 at Point Pleasant, Mason Co., West Va. Died in Victoria, Texas Feb. 22, 1884." Also at the gravesite is a foot marker with a small star and wreath erected by the State of Texas in 1962. It states: "Served in the Texas War for Independence. Escaped the Goliad Massacre in 1836." The James W. Fannin Society, Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Mrs. Ben T. Jordan, Chairman, furnished historical documentation for the marker.

"John Van Bibber served in the War for Texas Independence as a member of Captain B.L. Lawrence’s Company of Tennessee volunteers that were organized at Nacogdoches in December, 1835 for fighting at San Antonio, but he did not arrive in time for the surrender of Bexar. His name appears on the rolls of Captain B. H. Duval, Colonel James W. Fannin’s Command, as being in this company from December 25, 1835 to February 29, 1836 and has the notation in the "Remarks" column that he escaped the massacre. This escape can be explained by the fact that he was absent on sick leave at the battle on Coleto Creek, March 19, 1836. An unmarried man, he operated a grocery store, made a trip to California during the gold rush and it is said that he had some success."

Additional John Van Bibber Documents:

Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution, ed. Daughters of the Republic of Texas (Lubbock: Craftsman Printers, Inc. 1986), 35.0
Republic of Texas Poll Lists for 1846, Victoria County, n.p.l.
Federal Census Records:
1860 Victoria County, Texas p. 36 dwelling #270, b. Va., Real Estate Broker, Personal Estate $5,000.00
1870 Victoria County, Texas p. 12, dwelling #90, b. Va., No occupation shown, Value of Real Estate $3000.00
1880 Victoria County, Texas p. 135, dwelling # 6, b. Va., father, mother, b. in Va., single, no occupation, age 83.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Victor Marion Rose, a Victoria newspaper editor, poet, and historian who knew John Van Bibber, mentions him in his collection of historical facts regarding the Settlement of Victoria, Texas. The first mention was 06 August 1840 when John aided Capt. J.O. Wheeler in escaping from the Comanche Indians in the Indian Raid on Victoria. "Capt. J.O. Wheeler was pursued by the Indians into the town of Victoria. . . and but for the fleetness of his horse, "Old Robin," and a prompt diversion created in his favor by Mr. John Van Bibber, must have been killed."

The next mention is when "a number of our citizens took the "gold fever," and went to California—among whom were. . .John Van Bibber [and others]." Rose’s mentions John again in 1883 because of his assets—"John Van Bibber, $11,940."

Finally, Rose wrote a brief character sketch of John Van Bibber at the close of his book:

John Van Bibber was probably a native of Virginia, though it is thought he came to Texas immediately from the state of Kentucky, which removal was possibly early as the year 1835, as he was a member of the ill-starred Fannin’s regiment; and escaped the Goliad massacre only by reason of his being absent on "sick leave." He located in Victoria, and opened a grocery store opposite the "Ingram house," soon after the retreat of the Mexican army; in which business he continued probably as late as the year 1847, when he went to California, as did P. Rose, the Lansing family; Wash Trayson, and others in Victoria, about that time, in search of the ‘golden fleece." He returned about the year 1850; having augmented somewhat his future.

When the Comanches pursued J.O. Wheeler into Victoria, in 1840, Mr. Van Bibber ran to his rescue, which had the effect of turning his most determined pursuer, and doubtless saved his life, as the savage was fast gaining upon him. Mr. Van Bibber never married; and has pursued the "even tenor of his way," a familiar object on the streets of Victoria for over a half century. He is yet living, though past four score years of age, and in happy possession of all his faculties. A brother, from California, visited him in the winter of 1883, whom he had not met for over forty years. The changes that he has witnessed in Victoria alone would fill a volume, and prove of exciting interest to the reader. Alas, that none of our early pioneers were commentators, as well as actors in the drama of life! Mr. Van Bibber died in Victoria February, 1884."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A petition made by John Van Bibber to the Republic of Texas stating that he emigrated to Texas in the year 1835 and joined the Division of the Army under the command of Colonel Fannin at Goliad early in the month of January, 1836 under the command of Captain Thomas under whom he served until the 12th of February when he was discharged by Samuel Wilson, Lieutenant commanding and joined Captain Duval’s company and was attached to said company until after the Declaration of Independence by the convention of the People of Texas and until his health disabled him from performing the duties of a soldier when he obtained a furlough from Colonel Fannin and a passport from Samuel P. Carson, Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas. He went on to say that in the year 1839 he applied to and received from the Board of Land Commissioners for Victoria County a certificate for one third of a League of Land as a first class head right and located the same in Victoria County. He was refuting a fraudulent claim against his right to the land by stating that the Commissioners refused to recommend his land certificate but that it was a genuine and good claim. He asked for a jury to try his right to a third of a League of Land, etc. The General Land Office in Austin verified his claim that he served faithfully and honorably in the Army of the Republic of Texas. The date of the petition was 20 August 1874. In 1852, for his service and having escaped the Massacre of Fannin, he received a Bounty Warrant #1073 for 320 acres of land in Goliad County near Media Creek. In 1853, he received 320 acres in Bee County, adjacent to Goliad County. When John reached the age of 77, he applied for a pension for his service in the Army of the Republic in 1836. His disposition was approved on 29 June 1871 and he received $250.00.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Probate Court Records in the Victoria County Courthouse reveal numerous files pertaining to the estate of John Van Bibber. There were records permitting John to receive and disperse any monetary sums belonging to or due his cousin, James Van Bibber, who also had come to fight for the Republic of Texas. Next is John’s will written on 09 February 1884, shortly less than two weeks before his death, where he named John S. Munn as executor, and H.C. Cunningham, F.A. Fenner, and E.A. Thurber as witnesses. The legatees "devised by the deceased" in his will are as follows:

To the heirs of Joshua Rollins, residence unknown, five hundred dollars.
To the heirs of Cyrus Van Bibber, supposed to reside in Kentucky, five hundred dollars.
To the heirs of Rhoda Tanner, supposed to reside in Kentucky, five hundred dollars.
To the heirs of James Van Bibber, residence unknown, five hundred dollars
To Albert Van Bibber and his heirs three thousand dollars.
To Mrs. Emma Gentry whose maiden name was Emma Hall, five thousand dollars. The file date was 12 March 1884.

On 13 June 1884, Eugene Sibley entered the story. He appeared before the Court and claimed that John S. Munn had "wholly failed to qualify as said Executor and more than twenty days had lapsed since the probate of the will." He stated there were claims due to the estate that were necessary to collect, and sundry matters of business, which required settlement. He stated he was requested by the next of kin of the testators to administer the estate and asked to be duly appointed. On 05 August 1884, Sibley was appointed Administrator of the estate.


The next item was filed 07 October 1884 when Sibley made a report to the Court and stated that Albert Van Bibber, brother of the deceased, claimed one gold watch of probable value of eighty dollars. {There is some speculation that Albert is the brother who came from California to visit John in 1883—the brother he had not seen in 40 years.} The probate note signed by Sibley also stated the whole of the estate consisted of money in the bank and claims in the form of promissory notes totaling $14,824.23.


A year and a half later on 18 January 1886, controversy set in when the heirs of Cyrus Van Bibber and other heirs of John Van Bibber’s will filed a petition against Eugene Sibley, Administrator of John Van Bibber’s estate, Mrs. Emma Gentry, one of the legatees, and Theodore Buhler, administrator representing Albert Van Bibber, now deceased. They asked that the probate of John Van Bibber’s will be revoked and set aside. Their rationale for this request was based on the possibility of John’s imbecility when he wrote his will. Cunningham and Tanner testified the will was true and legally executed. The Court denied the petition and ordered the administration of John Van Bibber’s will be done without delay.

Three days later, on 13 January 1886, Eugene Sibley claimed that John Van Bibber’s will had been duly probated and established in the Court giving legacies as follows:

To the heirs of Joshua Rollins five hundred dollars.
To the heirs of Cyrus Van Bibber five hundred dollars.
To the heirs of James Van Bibber five hundred dollars.
To Albert Van Bibber and his heirs three thousand dollars.
To Mrs. Emma Gentry five thousand dollars.

He further stated there were no debts against the estate yet unpaid and the estate was now ready for distribution among the legatees of the will and the heirs at law of the testator. He gave a lengthy account of the bills he paid and his efforts to locate the Van Bibber legatees. The balance on hand in the account was now $8,035.57.


Additional probate minutes concerned the distribution of the estate. A note of interest since Mrs. Emma Gentry is buried next to John Van Bibber in Evergreen Cemetery, is found on pages 43-44, 20 April 1886: "Mrs. Emma Gentry, a legatee of the Will of John Van Bibber, deceased, came into court and stated that she was living separate and apart from her husband, F.V. Gentry, who was for more than three years absent from this state and living in New Mexico, during which time he had contributed nothing to her support, and who took no care of her pecuniary interests. She prayed the court that the Administrator here in be ordered to pay to her in person the legacy bequeathed to her by said John Van Bibber." The court honored her request.


On 21 July 1886, more than two years after John Van Bibber died, the final accounting, partition, and distribution of his estate was completed and all surviving and deceased heirs are listed along with their current residence. It is a treasure of genealogical information regarding the siblings and heirs of John Van Bibber.


This is only part of John’s story, a man born in Point Pleasant, Virginia (now WV) who came to Texas to seek his fortune; a man whose life was spared from the Goliad Massacre by illness; a man who made a place for himself in the history of Victoria, Texas. There is always more to discover, but thanks to the sharing of research by Gary and Earl, and Gary Dunnam of Victoria Preservation, Inc., and by digging into archive, land, and court records, we now have more of John Van Bibber’s story, the story between the dashes on his gravestone.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Captain Duval's Company
(Kentucky Mustangs--First Regiment Volunteers from Bardstown)

Captured and Executed 27 March
Captain Burr H. Duval
Lieutenants Samuel Wilson, William Jefferson Merrifield
Sergeants George Washington Daniel, James S. Bagby, Enoch P. Gaines Chisum, William P. Dickerman
Corporals Norborne B. Hawkins, Abner B. Williams, A. H. Lynd, Richard G. Brashear

James Moss Adams, James S. Batts, Fred J. Bellows, William S. Carlson, Thomas T. Churchill, William H. Cole, John Donohoo, H. M. Downman, George Dyer, Charles Ready Haskell, Edward J. Johnson, James P. Kemp, Adams G. Lamond, James A. McDonald, William Mayer, Harvey Martin, Robert Smith Owings, Robert R. Rainey, Samuel Smith Sanders, Lawson S. Simpson, Lewis Tilson, B. W. Tolover, J. Q. Volckner, William Waggoner

Escaped during massacre 27 March
Thomas G. Allen, John Crittenden Duval, John C. Holliday, William Mason, Charles B. Shain, Augustus V. Sharpe

Spared execution by intercession 27 March
John Van Bibber (ill); Sidney Van Bibber, Ulrich Wuthrich

Spared execution for absence or illness 14-27 March
Dr. William H. Magee
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Maggie Ann VanBibber
David M. Kouns - s/o John L. Kouns
b. 1816
m. 24 May 1834 Greenup Co. KY
NOTE: Christian Kouns s/o David M. and Maggie VanBibber. b. ca 1836 Indiana
Thomas Kouns - s/o David M. and Maggie VanBibber
b. ca 1840 Indiana
Eveline E. Kouns - d/o David M. and Maggie VanBibber
b. ca 1845 Indiana
Fana Ann Kouns - d/o David M. and Maggie VanBibber
b. ca 1849 Kentucky
Marinda A. Kouns - d/o David M. and Maggie VanBibber
b. ca 1837 Indiana
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Caroline Van Bibber to William Smith Kouns - 21 Oct. 1841, d/o Cyrus and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake

Charles W. Van Bibber to Emma L. Lowder - 24 Sept. 1868, s/o James and Sarah Bradburn, d/o George W. and Josephine Thomas

Charles Van Bibber (wid., age 50, b. Greenup Co., KY) to Telitha Madden (age 24, b. Greenup Co., KY) - 17 Nov. 1918, s/o James and Sarah Bradburn

Cyrus Van Bibber to Mary Timberlake - 26 Dec. 1821, s/o James and Lois Reynolds, d/o Oba Timberlake

Cyrus Van Bibber to Sophia A. Baker - 1 Jan. 1855, s/o Cyrus and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake, d/o Marshall and Mary Carnegy

Cyrus Van Bibber to Abeline Clutz (Clutts) - 17 Dec. 1872, s/o Cyrus and Mary Timberlake,

Cyrus D. Van Bibber to Lucy E. Hockaday - 23 Feb. 1887, s/o Charles W. and Caroline Dewar, d/o James and Ann Eliza Biggs

David Van Bibber to Minnie Ederwine - 22 Feb. 1876, s/o Ezekiel and Susan Rice

Eliza [Naomi] Van Bibber to William K.[ing] Boal - 4 Apr. 1855, d/o Dr.James Van Bibber Jr.

Elizabeth Ann Van Bibber to David Millirons - 17 May 1834, d/o Jacob and Sarah Miller

Elizabeth Van Bibber to William Nethercutt - 28 Jan. 1854, d/o Ezekiel and Sarah Rice

Elizabeth Van Bibber to Elbert T. Eggers - 4 Jan. 1888

Esther Van Bibber to Aaron Lore - 30 Sept. 1857, d/o Ezekiel and Susan Rice

Ezekiel Van Bibber to Susan Rice - 20 Dec. 1833, s/o Jacob and Sarah Miller, d/o Elijah and Sarah Riffe

Fannie Van Bibber to Roger T. Waring - 11 Feb. 1879, d/o Cyrus and Sophia A. Baker

Faris Van Bibber (age 20, b. Greenup Co., KY) to Bessie L. Bedford (age 17, b. Greenup Co., KY - 6 Nov. 1911, s/o Lamard and Annie Hill

Hannah Van Bibber to Joshua Rawlings - 11 Mar. 1815, d/o James and Lois Reynolds

Harding Van Bibber to Elizabeth Jane Artis - 24 Apr. 1864, s/o Ezekiel and Susan Rice

Harriett Van Bibber to Richard L. Burchett - 31 Aug. 1865

Jacob Van Bibber to Margaret Bryson - 11 Feb. 1828, s/o Jacob and Sarah Miller

James Van Bibber to Sarah Bradburn - 7 Nov. 1867

James Van Bibber to Margaret Jane Webb - 3 Mar. 1887, d/o Daniel D.

James F. [T] Van Bibber to Eveline Reason - 1 June 1854, s/o Cyrus and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake

John W. Van Bibber to Polly J. Roe - 15 Oct. 1903, s/o James and Sarah Bradburn

Lamard Van Bibber to Annie L. Hill - 3 May 1883, s/o Cyrus Jr. and Sophia Baker, d/o Amos and Elizabeth Smith

Lola Van Bibber (age 16, b. Greenup Co., KY) to Dennie Adkins (age 18, b. Elliott Co., KY) - 14 July 1917

Maggie (Mary Anne) Van Bibber to David M. Kouns - 24 May 1834, d/o Jacob and Sarah Miller, s/o John L.

Mary Ann Van Bibber to Pearson McCoy - 30 Nov. 1870, d/o Cyrus and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake

Nancy Van Bibber to Moses Haney - 13 Jan. 1827, d/o Jacob and Sarah Miller

Peter Van Bibber to Nancy DeVore - 4 May 1815, s/o Jacob and Sarah Miller

Rhoda Van Bibber to John [Passmore] Tanner - 11 May 1830, d/o Dr. James Van Bibber Jr.

Ruth Van Bibber to George Hensley - 20 May 1815, d/o Jacob and Sarah Miller, s/o Samuel and Sibba

Solomon Van Bibber to Jane Bryson - 2 Jan. 1826, s/o Jacob and Sarah Miller

Thomas Van Bibber to Inez Johnson - 24 Jan. 1890, s/o Cyrus and Abeline Clutz, d/o Isaac and Caroline McGinnis

VAN BIBBER BURIALS IN GREENUP COUNTY KENTUCKY

Name Date of birth Date of death Cemetery Remarks

Van Bibber, Carl 1914 1928 Brick Union

Van Bibber, Bessie 1910 1920 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Charles W. 1868 1946 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Edith 1927 1954 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Emma L. 1874 1960 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Finley 1906 1906 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Harvey Walker 1933 1934 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Paul Jasper 1936 1942 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Ruth Ellenor ------ -------
English Cemetery

Van Bibber, William M. 1894 1951 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Telitha 1892 1974 Felty No. 2

Van Bibber, Angela 29 July 1931 29 Dec. 1963 Mt. Zion

Van Bibber, Carrie B. 28 Nov. 1904 ------
Mt. Zion

Van Bibber, Maurice H. 19 Nov. 1895 ------
Mt. Zion

Van Bibber, Cyrus W. Sr 3 June 1799 ------
Van Bibber

Van Bibber, Mary S. 19 July 1799 14 Aug. 1879 Van Bibber OSSW & w/o Cyrus Sr.

Van Bibber, Ellen ------ 22 June ---- Van Bibber d/o M. Van Bibber, age 5yrs, 9 days.

Van Bibber, Harvey ------- 7 Mar. 1880 Van Bibber Age 44y, 10m, 29d.

Van Bibber, James ------ 5 Aug. 1841 Van Bibber Age, 79y, 3d

Van Bibber, Lois ------ 30 Aug. 1850 Van Bibber Age, 78, 8m, 27d

Van Bibber, Carrie 19 Jan. 1839 27 Aug. 1884 Riverview Wife of C. W.

Van Bibber, Charles W. ------ ------ Riverview Co. K 10th KY Cav.

Van Bibber, Rachel 14 Apr. 1861 10 May 1883 Riverview d/o Carrie Van Bibber

Van Bibber, Anne Aug. 1865 Mar. 1945
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Annie Louise 1913 1946
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Clarence July 1884 1884
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Cyrus Apr. 1826 Sept. 1900
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Homer L. 1889 1915
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Jo Evelyn 1932 1932
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Lamard 12 Feb. 1959 20 Aug. 1929 Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Sophia Dec. 1834 May 1870
Vernon Van Bibber Farm

Van Bibber, Edna M 1907 ------
Bellefonte Memorial Gardens, OSSW, w/o Vernon M.

Van Bibber, Vernon M. 1908 1976
Bellefonte Memorial Gardens

Van Bibber, Fred H. 28 Dec. 1887 20 Jan. 1974 Bellefont Memorial Gardens,
PFC, US. Army WWI
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BELL CO. KENTUCKY

Lee Oris VanBever - Turner Cem., Bell Co., KY - 2 Oct. 1931 - 30 Aug. 1993

Frank Vanbeber - Hurst Cem., Bell Co., KY - 28 May 1880 - 28 Apr. 1964

Eller Vanbeber - Hurst Cem. Bell Co., KY - 18 Mar. 1898 - One date
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BIRTHS

Name: VANBIBBER, Charles E
Born: Apr 19 1912 in , Greenup Co, KY
Mother: Belford, Bessie
Record/Certificate #: 12-045-17720

Name: VANBIBBER, Luther J
Born: Oct 27 1912 in , Bell Co, KY
Mother: Vanbever, Elly
Record/Certificate #: 13-122-60584
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Spouse DOM County
Jacob Vanbeber Mary Copas 12 Nov 1810 Adams
William Vanbever Rebecca Shoemaker 23 Jun 1825 Adams
Amanda M. Van Bibber James Sams 13 Dec 1874 Athens
Emma C. Van Bibber Jasper Long 10 Sep 1871 Athens
James Van Bibber Malvian Rariden 19 Jun 1851 Athens
James A. Van Bibber Minnie Duglas 01 Mar 1895 Athens
Jennie Van Bibber Frederick Finsterwald 24 Sep 1892 Athens
Jesse Van Bibber Lovie Hinkle 14 Nov 1877 Athens
Jonathan Van Bibber Jennie Brooks 01 Feb 1888 Athens
Jonathan Van Bibber Mary Ann Robinson 05 Aug 1847 Athens
Judson P. Van Bibber Sarah Clendennin 31 Aug 1887 Athens
June Van Bibber William Burt 22 May 1878 Athens
Loyal Van Bibber Sarah Elizabeth Robinson 06 Mar 1854 Athens
Merrill Van Bibber Mary Axtell 16 Jun 1842 Athens
Merrit Van Bibber Cynthia Carr 08 Mar 1887 Athens
William Van Bibber Nancy Jane Brown 12 Apr 1874 Athens
Isaac Van Bible Mary Walmner 27 Dec 1810 Jefferson
James T. Van Bibber Esq. Evoline Raison 01 Jun 1853 Lawrence
Olivia Van Bibber David Gandy 06 Mar 1821 Lawrence
Susan Van Bibber David J. Keeton 21 Jul 1859 Lawrence
Jonathan Van Bibber Mary Jane Howell 02 Apr 1853 Meigs
John Van Beber Patty (Poly) Trigs 25 Jan 1812 Scioto
Jacob Van Bever Elizabeth McKinney 04 Nov 1824 Scioto
Eleanor Van Bibber Noah Bryson 25 Aug 1830 Scioto
Elizabeth Van Bibber Ezra Jeffords 4. ? Scioto
Isaac Van Bibber Mary Shope 2. 15 Dec 1819 Scioto
James Van Bibber Naoma B. White 3. 16 July 1836 Scioto
Jonathan Van Bibber Eliza Crank/Frank 1. 05 Feb 1829 Scioto
Lavina Van Bibber Lauderback 16 Apr 1843 Scioto
Morton Van Bibber Avis Mariah English 09 Sep 1919 Scioto
Noah (Joseph) Van Bibber Mary Rice 18 Dec 1848 Scioto
Rebecca Van Bibber Benjamin P. Smith 29 Sep 1864 Scioto
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Spouse DOM County
Sophronia/Verona Van Bibber George Dixon 20 Nov 1782 Greenbrier
Mary Van Bibber Andrew Donnally 01 Jun 1802 Kanawaha
Elizabeth Van Bibber Richard Tillis 12 Sep 1829 Mason
Peter Van Bibber Eleanor Van Bibber 29 Jun 1785 by Rev. John Alderson Jr.; Rockingham or Greenbrier County
Peter Van Bibber Sarah Yolkecome 22 Jul 1785
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Spouse DOM County
Betsy Vanbever Edward Sparks 14 Apr 1850 Brown
Sarah Vanbever Elijah Long 21 Dec 1850 Brown
John H. VanBebber Laura R. VanBebber 07 Feb 1900 Greene
Sarah Ann Vanbiber Granville Wise 10 Sep 1846 Johnson
Algy D. VanBebber Ella Stultz 18 Aug 1896 Macoupin
Clifford M. VanBebber Lena M. Ingram 02 Aug 1919 Macoupin
Edward W. VanBebber Dowland Lillie 06 Sep 1899 Macoupin
Ernest VanBebber Myrle Nighbert 27 Sep 1910 Macoupin
Leland P. VanBebber Lena E. Spencer 18 Dec 1916 Macoupin
Ward C. VanBebber Alice J. Hasting 21 Nov 1941 Macoupin
Mathias Vanbibber Sarah Ferguson 29 Jun 1823 Monroe
Eliza Van Bibber Jesse Darling 06 Jun 1868 Pike
Susan Van Bibber John Darling 05 Dec 1834 Pike
Bertha VanBaber W. S. Burns 08 May 1902 Pope
Helen M. VanBaber George W. Doctorman 03 Jul 1902 Pope
J. J. VanBaber Ellen Dunning 26 Jun 1902 Pope
Jessie VanBaber Nancy T. Goins 27 Oct 1881 Pope
Martha VanBaber William A. Crabb 30 Jun 1901 Pope
Andrew Van Bibber Elizabeth Joiner 29 Apr 1886 Pope
Esther Vinbibber James Waggoner 04 May 1841 Pope
Jessee Vanbibber Elizabeth Yewell 23 Sep 1846 Pope
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Rachel Vanbeeber
Samuel Kincart
23 Dec 1828 Ripley

Sarah Vanbeber
John Yocam
22 Jan 1825 Ripley

Sarah Van Bibber
Madison Noel
17 Aug 1837 Switzerland
NOTE: FROM A QUERY
22 Jul 2002
Madison Noel married Sarah Van Bibber 17 Aug 1837. The marriage took place in Switzerland County Ind. They returned and lived in Owenton Kentucky. By the 1850 census, Sarah was listed as head of house hold with several children. One of the children was my grandfather William T Noel. Sarah later that year married a James Lee adding more children. I can find no information on Madison Noel, what ended the marriage or where did he go?

Albert VanBibber
to Ann Mary Sutton
Thursday, July 8, 1880

Alice Van Bibber
Ernest Bo-son?
06 Nov 188? Vanderburgh

America L. Van Bibber
William T. Crafton
23 June 1873 Vanderburgh

Andrew J. Van Bibber
Elizabeth Dukes
29 Apr 1861 Vanderburgh

Beda/Boda Van Bibber
William Donaldson
05 Apr 1853 Vanderburgh

Carl C. Van Bibber
Millie White
08 Nov 1910 Vanderburgh

Cora May Van Bibber
Andrew C. Kolb
28 Jul 1907? Vanderburgh

Delila Vanbibber
John Strong
10 Nov 1842 Vanderburgh

Elizabeth Van Bibber
J. G. Hubbert
16 Apr 1860 Vanderburgh

(ETHEL) Vanbibber
CROW
1900

Etta M. Van Bibber
George Hutchison
05 Jul 1916 Vanderburgh

George Van Bibber
Ethel Conner
12 Jul 1919 Vanderburgh

Grover Van Bibber
Vina Priest
Vanderburgh

Hazel Van Bibber
David Knight
Vanderburgh
Feb 5, 1915, , , , Jul 26, 1891, 16, 231, 4306

Henry Van Bibber
Sarah Kamons
13 Oct 1900 Vanderburgh

Irene A. Van Bibber
Grover S. Van Meter
22 Jul 1912 Vanderburgh

Isaac Van Bibber
Missouri Ann Sutton
10 Feb 1856 Vanderburgh

Isaac Van Bibber
Eliza Hensholder
04 Oct 1873 Vanderburgh

Isaac Van Bibber
Marie F. Schaefer
13 Jun 1881 Vanderburgh

Jacob Van Bibber
Jane Herly/Healy
20 Sep 1849 Vanderburgh

John Van Bibber
Homa/Hame? Woods
24 Aug 1876 Vanderburgh

John (H) Van Bibber
Carrie Bauer
16 May 1900 Vanderburgh

John Van Bibber
Isabella Martin
27 Oct 1878 Vanderburgh

John Van Bibber
Flora Stewart
30 Sep 1895 Vanderburgh

Jonathan Van Bibber
Nancy Chriswell
09 Dec 1841 Vanderburgh

Lillian Van Bibber
Sig-Und? Eichel
03 Sep 1903 Vanderburgh

Lucinda Van Bibber
Joseph Coker
06 Feb 1851 Vanderburgh

Lula Van Bibber
Chas A. Sisson
15 Jun 1901 Vanderburgh

Lula Van Bibber
Charles Meredith
03 Oct 1903 Vanderburgh

Martha J. O. Van Bibber
Michael J. Sutton
03 Jan 1861 Vanderburgh

M. E. Van Bibber
Frederick Lonzo
10 Jul 1869 Vanderburgh

Margaret Van Bibber
Peter Ising
11 Sep 1867 Vanderburgh

Mary Van Bibber
Robert Bullett
31 Jul 1873 Vanderburgh

Mary Van Bibber
Samuel Wilkins
20 Jan 1892 Vanderburgh

Mathias Van Bibber
Sarah Bristol
20 Aug 1854 Vanderburgh

Mina M. Van Bibber
Ottie Hubbard
08 Jul 1915 Vanderburgh

Olive Van Bibber
James H. Carr
19 Feb 1888 Vanderburgh

Olive Vanbever
Josiah Lenn
26 May 1831 Vanderburgh

Ollie Van Bibber
John Jervis
01 Aug 1876 Vanderburgh

Ollie (OLIVE) Van Bibber
Henry Tafel
06 Jan 1906 Vanderburgh

Pearl Van Bibber
Attemas? C. Colegate
19 Jan 1899 Vanderburgh

Peter Van Bibber
Lavinia Phillips
08 04 Oct 1836 Vanderburgh

Peter Van Bibber
Sarah Jane Chancellar
01 Apr 1847 Vanderburgh

Peter Van Bibber
Sarah C. Tucker
25 May 1864 Vanderburgh

Peter Van Bibber
Susan Carney
14 Jun 1845 Vanderburgh

Rose Van Bibber
A. R. Duncan
25 Jan 1902 Vanderburgh

Sarah Van Bibber
Joshua Wheeler
Vanderburgh

William Van Bibber
Mary Ann Garnett
02 Feb 1871 Vanderburgh

William Van Bibber
Mary Williams
No date Vanderburgh

William Van Bibber
Obedience Watson
01 Jul 1834 Vanderburgh

William Van Bibber
Vienna Sutton
30 Aug 1857 Vanderburgh

Artie M. Vanbibber
Geo W. Southwell
07 Jun 1911 Warrick

Bertha B. Vanbibber
William C. Pate
22 May 1919 Warrick

Carrie Vanbibber
Allen Ellis
04 Mar 1917 Warrick

Hazel M. Vanbibber
David L. Knight
05 Feb 1915 Warrick

Jonathan Vanbibber
Polly Phillips
23 Jan 1843 Warrick

Nadine Vanbibber
Ivan Walker
15 Feb 1915 Warrick
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
INDIANA MARRIAGE RECORDS INDEX, 1845-1920


Spouse 1 Spouse 2 Marriage Date County Book/Page

Elizabeth McKenzie
Edward Van Bibber
14 Apr 1902 Clay 11-263

Benj. Jones
V. Van Bibber
16 May 1872 Knox C8-203

Helea (HELEN) E. Luttvull (LUTTRELL)
E. C. Van Bibber
08 Jan 1900 Madison 8-367

Ida Van Bibber
George W Baker
16 Jun 1902 Madison 10-316

James H. Carr
Olive Van Bibber
19 Feb 1888 Vanderburgh 14-205

William Donaldson
Beda Van Bibber
05 Apr 1853 Vanderburgh 2-504

Charles A. Sisson
Lula Van Bibber
15 Jun 1901 Vanderburgh 21-545

Henry Tafel
(OLIVE) Ollie Van Bibber
06 Jan 1906 Vanderburgh 27-46
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac Van Bibber, War of 1812.
Vanbeber, Isaac - Was with Jackson in Battle of New Orleans. Pvt. Dry Branch
cemetery, Colmar, Ky. (No headstone)

Robinson Van Bibber, 92nd OVI, killed Battle of Missionary Ridge, Civil War.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
UNITED STATES ARMY
Baker, Elizabeth M. -- Untied States Army Nurse Corps, 1942-1945, 1st Lieutenant, WWII
Baker, Walter L. -- United States Army, 1940-1943, Private, WWII
Berry, Bryan A. -- United States Army, 1970-1972, SPC4, Vietnam
Brown, James -- United States Army, 1986-1992, Corporal
Brown, Joseph -- United States Army, 1979-1989, Corporal
Burnham, Wesley B. -- United States Army, 2001-Present, SPC
Cragg, Rexford B. -- United States Army, 1918-1919, Sergeant
Freriks, Stanley R. -- United States Army, 1942-1946, TEC4, WWII
Gilbert, Leonard A. -- United States Army, 1970-1978, Staff Sergeant
Hammonds, Bobby J. -- United States Army, Korean War
Hammonds, Rexford M. Sr., -- United States Army, 1943-1946, Corporal, WWII
Hawkins, Charles T. -- United States Army, 1953-1955, Private First Class, Korean War
Hawkins, James -- United States Army, 2002-Present, Private First Class, Iraq War
Harvey, Earl K. -- United States Army, 1956-1962, SPC5
Harvey, Richard A. -- United States Army, 1982-1985, SPC4
Hase, Bob -- United States Army, 1962-1965, Sergeant
Hawpe, Dwayne A. -- United States Army, 1969-1971, SPC5, Vietnam
Ross, Benjamin R. -- United States Army, WWI
Ross, Doctor J. -- United States Army, WWI
Ross, William M. -- United States Army, WWI
Kahler, Bill H. -- United States Army, 1945-1947, Private First Class, WWII
Kuldas, Louise J. -- United States Army, Sergeant, 1951-1954, Sergeant
Kuldas, Rob -- United States Army, 1963-1992 Sergeant Major, Vietnam/Gulf War
Logan, Bruce E. Jr. -- United States Army, 1963-1966, Sergeant
Louwaert, Jacob M. -- United States Army, 2000-Present, Corporal
Mann, David James -- United States Army, 2001-Present, SPC4
Mann, Lawrence C. -- United States Army, 1980-2000, Sergeant First Class
McClevinus, Paul C. -- United States Army, 1952-1953, Private First Class, Korean War
McMurray, Daniel R. -- United States Army, 1967-1969, 1980-1998, Sergeant First Class, Vietnam
Molencupp, Joe R. -- United States Army, 1959-1962, SPC4
Payne, Stanley W. -- United States Army, 1949-1952/1958-1974, CWO4, Korea/Vietnam
Price, Thomas W. -- United States Army, 1945-1947, Sergeant, WWII
Putney, Thomas S.B. Jr., -- United States Army, 1967-1970, Sergeant, Vietnam
Shoemaker, Duane -- United States Army, 1986-1989, Ohio Army National Guard, 1989 - Present, Major
Stewart, Mark E. -- United State Army, SPC4
Troyer, Joan -- United States Army, 1974-2000, Sergeant
Tunnell, John -- United States Army, 1968-1971, SPC5
Van Bebber, Calvin -- United States Army -- 1846-1847/1862-1865, Private, Mexican/Civil War
Van Bebber, Charles W. -- United States Army, 1983-Present, Lt. Colonel
Van Bebber, Ronnie -- United States Army, 1964-1966, Sergeant, Vietnam
Van Bebber, Theodore J. -- United States Army, 1952-1954, Sergeant, Korean War
Van Bebber, Thomas J. -- United States Army, 1918-?, Private, WWI
Van Bebber, William H. -- United States Army, 1917-1919, Corporal, WWI
VanBever, Frank T. -- United States Army, Private, WWII
Van Bibber, Lewis -- United States Air Force/Army National Guard/United States Army, 1952-1976, Major, Vietnam
Van Bibber, Lester D. -- United States Army, Sergeant, 1969-1972
VanBibber, Orville W. -- United States Army, 1942-1945/1950-1951 Staff Sergeant, WWII
Walker, Dick -- United States Army, 1948-1952, Corporal, Korean War
Wilcox, Harold R. -- United States Army, 1952-1954, Corporal
Williams, Jerry A. -- United States Army, 1967-1970, SPC4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
UNITED STATES NAVY

Engler, Jeffrey -- United States Navy, 1960-1964, Petty Officer 2nd Class
Hartmeyer, Philip L. -- United States Navy, 1949-1953, Boilertech, Korean War
Harvey, Charles K. -- United States Navy, 1985-2000, Commander, Gulf War
Haywood, James E. -- United States Navy, 1941-1961, Chief, WWII/Korean War
Herron, Lewis L. -- United States Navy, 1942-1945, Petty Officer 2nd Class, WWII
Louwaert, Peter M. -- United States Navy, 1960-1964, Petty Officer 2nd Class
Parker, Donald M. -- United States Navy, 1982-1986, Petty Officer 3rd Class
Schafer, Charles R., Jr. -- United States Navy, 1964-1988, Senior Chief Petty Officer, Vietnam
Schafer, Gregory A. -- United States Navy, 1967-1969, Petty Officer 2nd Class, Vietnam
Schafer, Nicky C. -- United States Navy, 1969-1972, Petty Officer 2nd Class, Vietnam
Simmons, Kyle -- United States Navy, 1967-1968, Petty Officer 3rd Class
Snyder, Evelyn -- United States Navy, Petty Officer 3rd Class
Starr, Bryan -- United States Navy, 1969-1977, Petty Officer 3rd Class
Starr, Dean -- United States Navy, 1975-1980, Petty Officer 2nd Class
Straight, David D. -- United States Navy, 1961-1965, Petty Officer 2nd Class
Taylor, Earl -- United States Navy, 1937-1945, Chief Petty Officer, WWII
Taylor, James E. -- United States Navy, 1962-1992, Captain, Vietnam/Gulf War
VanBibber, Louis E. United States Navy, 1942-1946, WWII
Walker, Clyde A. -- United States Navy, 1917-1924, Petty Officer 1st Class, WWI
Williams, Terry -- United States Navy, 1960-1963, Petty Officer 2nd Class
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

Essary, Terry -- United States Marine Corps, 1989-1993, Lance Corporal, Gulf War
Green, Thomas -- United States Marine Corps, 1998-2002, Sergeant
Hawkins, Randall T. -- United States Marine Corps, 1974-1977, Sergeant
Hawpe, David M. -- United States Marine Corps, 1979-1983, Corporal
Hawpe, Gary R. -- United States Marine Corps, 1973-2003, Sergeant Major
Lane, Dale -- United States Marine Corps, 1957-1974, Gunnery Sergeant
Louwaert, Charles W. -- United States Marine Corps, 1956-1962, Private First Class
Martinsen, Scott -- United States Marine Corps, 1986-1992, Corporal, Gulf War
Van Bibber, Charles R. -- United States Marine Corps, 1970-1980, Staff Sergeant, Vietnam

THE FEW, THE PROUD, THE UNITED STATES MARINES!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

Bays, Lendville -- United States Air Force, 1973-1981, Staff Sergeant, Vietnam
Boeve-Swain, Jennifer M. -- United States Air Force, 2002-Present, Airman First Class
Brown, Henry W. -- United States Air Force, 1951-1955, A2C, Korea
Conner, Noble F., Jr. -- United States Army Air Forces, 1943-1945 Tech Sgt. Third Class, WWII
Fetsch, Stanley Jr., United States Army Air Forces, 1942-1945, Staff Sergeant, WWII
Fulfer, Luther D. -- United States Air Force, 1954-1982, Senior Master Sergeant, Vietnam
Fulfer, Terry -- United States Air Force, 1987-1997, Sergeant, Gulf War
Hawpe, George M. -- United States Air Force, 2000-Present, Senior Airman
Herron, Forrest, Jr. -- United States Navy, 1942-1946, United States Air Force, 1950-1973, Senior Master Sergeant, WWII/Korea/Vietnam
Herron, Lawrence A. -- United States Air Force, 1950-1952, Sergeant,
Herron, Marcus J. -- United States Air Force, 1950-1952, Staff Sergeant,
Holstein, Charles E. -- United States Air Force, 1961-1982, Master Sergeant
Howton, Robert -- United States Air Force, 1966-1972, Staff Sergeant, Vietnam
Jones, Jimmy L. -- United States Air Force, 1954-1977, Colonel, Vietnam
Kuldas, Lee -- United States Air Force, 1981-2003, Master Sergeant, Gulf War
Lynn, Bob -- United States Air Force, 1951-1976, Major, Vietnam
McMurray, Steven R. -- United States Air Force, 1991-1995, Senior Airman
Olson, Alan E. -- United States Air Force, 1959-1970, Lt. Colonel, Vietnam
Roguski, Treva -- United States Air Force, 1969-1991, Captain, Vietnam
Ruiz, Beverly L. -- United States Air Force, 1990-1993, Airman First Class
Serls, Dennis -- United States Air Force, 1997-2003, Sergeant
Stewart, Edsel D. -- United States Air Force, Tech Sergeant -- Korea
Warner, Earle H., Jr. -- United States Air Force/Army National Guard, 1950-1955, Airman/Private
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
These are the children of Gracie VanBever McCreary, daughter of John and Mariah VanBever:

1. John McCreary was a Sergeant in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II and died in a training accident in Wichita, Kansas in May 1945.
2. Frederick McCreary, enlisted during WWII, served in a bomber squadron off of the USS Intrepid. He was captured by the Japanese in the Pacific when his plane was hit and he bailed out. He died in June 1945 when the Japanese set fire to the entrance of the cave they were kept in. They either burned to death, or ran and were shot...ashes came home.
3. Helen McCreary, enlisted during WWII in Women's Army Corps. She married the man who brought her brother's ashes home.
4. George McCreary 1950-195? - United States Marine Corps - Korean War.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Elizabeth VanBibber and Ezra Jeffords
Elza Jeffords and Nancy Pitt

ELZA JEFFORDS
1826 - 1885

JEFFORDS, Elza, a Representative from Mississippi; born in Ironton, Lawrence County, Ohio, May 23, 1826; attended the common schools in Portsmouth, Ohio; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1847 and commenced practice in Portsmouth, Ohio; served in the Army of the Tennessee from June 1862 to December 1863 as clerk in the Quartermaster’s Department; judge of the high court of errors and appeals in Mississippi 1868 and 1869; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1872; elected as a Republican to the Forty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1883 - March 3, 1885); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1884; died in Vicksburg, Miss., on March 19, 1885; interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery, near Vicksburg.

Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The Kansas City Journal of Monday contained the following story of Mrs. Emma Van Bibber of this city, who is at the Helping Hand Institute in Kansas City homeless and friendless, and who says she is looking for relatives in that city:
Emma Jane Van Bibber, 72 years old, once a wealthy woman, who claims to be the daughter of a cousin of Napoleon Bonaparte, Sunday was a guest of the Helping Hand Institute, a recipient of the favors accorded the destitute and friendless by that charity organization, after a night spent on a cot in the depot waiting room. She came to Kansas City from Chillicothe, Mo. Mrs. Van Bibber says that thirty-two years ago she gained national fame as the first woman to defend and win her own case in a Missouri court.
Explaining her relationship with the great French general, Mrs. Van Bibber said that Napoleon's mother was her great-grandfathers' sister.
"My grandfather was Dr. William Barbee, said to have been one of the foremost physicians of France during his time. Napoleon and my grandfather were intimate friends."
Mrs. Van Bibber was born in Claiborne county, in Eastern Tennessee, of French parentage, her father and mother having come to this country from France a few years before her birth. At the age of 16 years she came to Kansas City, and later moved with her parents to Ray county, Mo., where she met and married William H. Herron in 1853. Herron died in 1864, at the close of the civil war, from the effects of a gunshot wound received in the battle of Cold Harbor. He was a Union soldier.
Two years later Van Bibber appeared on the scene, and within a year Mrs. Herron had become his wife. Van Bibber died in 1870.
The woman appled to Mrs. Ollie Everingham, matron of the Union depot, for assistance in finding her nephew, Sam Shoemaker, who she declared lived "across the Kaw."
Source: The Chillicothe Constitution -- Chillicothe, Livingston County, Missouri -- April 20, 1909 -- Tuesday -- Page #1.
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. 3rd Batty. (Benton's) La. Lt. Arty. Roll of Prisoners of War of furloughed and detailed men, C. S. A., Paroled Shreveport, La., June 7, 1865. Res. New Orleans, La.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. Co. G, Confed. Grds. Regt. La. Mil. Roll for March 8 to April 30, 1862 (only Roll on file), En. March 8, 1862, New Orleans. Roll states Present. Note: Transfd. by Gov. Thos. O. Moore to Maj. Gen. M. Lovell. C. S. A., for local defense Page 906 of the City of New Orleans and its approaches.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Samuel, Pvt. Co. I, 27th La. Inf. Roll of Prisoners of War of detachments and regiments, La. and Ark. troops, C. S. A., Paroled Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Res. Shreveport, La.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan RAY CO. MISSOURI

Vanbebber, Henderson
31 Mar 1853
Grimes, Sarah Catherine
Vanbebber, John H.
01 Dec 1853
Barberry, Matilda
Vanbebber, Martha
17 Feb 1853
Kincaid, Franklin
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Surname: Van Bibber Christian name: Bert E.
Army serial number: 199,958
Race: W
Residence: Kansas City
Inducted at: Kansas City on 2/12/1917
Place of birth: Lyon Co. KS
Age or date of birth: 30 1/12 yr
Organizations served in, with dates of assignments and transfers:
CO A SIG C MISSOURI NG CO A 117 SIG BN TO DISCHARGE
Grades, with date of appointment: Cook
Wounds or other injuries received in action:
Served overseas from: 10/18/1917 to 4/27/1919
Honorably discharged on demobilization: Yes
In view of occupation he was, on date of discharge, reported N per cent disabled.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Surname: Van Bibber Christian name: Clyde
Army serial number: 199,961
Race: W
Residence: Kansas City
Inducted at: Kansas City on 5/15/1917
Place of birth: Danville, IL
Age or date of birth: 29 1/4 yr
Organizations served in, with dates of assignments and transfers:
CO B 117 FIELD SIG BN TO DISCHARGE
Grades, with date of appointment: PVT 5/1918
Wounds or other injuries received in action:
Served overseas from: 10/18/1917 to 4/27/1919
Honorably discharged on demobilization: Yes
In view of occupation he was, on date of discharge, reported N per cent disabled.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Surname: Van Bibber Christian name: Harry
Army serial number: 199,964
Race: W
Residence: Kansas City, MO
Inducted at: Kansas City, MO on 5/22/1917
Place of birth: Chicago, IL
Age or date of birth: 24 1/2 yr
Organizations served in, with dates of assignments and transfers:
CO A 117 FIELD SIG BN TO DISCHARGE
Grades, with date of appointment: CPL 10/1917
Wounds or other injuries received in action:
Served overseas from: 10/18/1917 to 4/27/1919
Honorably discharged on demobilization: Yes
In view of occupation he was, on date of discharge, reported N per cent disabled.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Source: World War I Military Service Cards Database
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber Spouse DOM County
George W. VanBebber Hattie G. Reynolds 06 Jan 1940 Collin
Elizabeth Van Bibber James A. Francis 22 Jul 1866 Hunt
Martha E. Van Bibber Pleasant Miller 12 Sep 1869 Hunt
Nancy B. Van Bibber Alexander A. Girdner 22 Jul 1877 Hunt
Claude A. VanBebber Ada. D. Long 14 Nov 1909 Montague
George W. VanBebber Dessie M. Nichols 30 Apr 1926 Montague
James N. VanBebber Mary J. Armstrong 12 Dec 1901 Montague
John C. VanBebber Belle Wilson 05 Jan 1883 Montague
John C. VanBebber Emarine G. Dane 28 Mar 1887 Montague
James A. VanBibber Zellah Warren 08 Apr 1896 Red River
Aug 16, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan VAN BIBBER FAMILY-CAPTAIN JOHN VAN BIBBER’S RESCUE
OF ONE OF HIS DAUGHTERS
A Paper Related To The Factual History Of Daniel Boone

The original account is part of an article by the name of "The Van Bibber Family", by Mrs. M.W. Donnally, printed in the West Virginia Historical Magazine, July 1903. As noted toward the end of the article, this story was told to the author by O.D. Hill, a grandnephew of David Van Bibber, who was a grandson of John Van Bibber through John’s son, Mathias Van Bibber. David had told O.D. Hill the stories in 1882.

"Shortly after the Van Bibbers had left their lands in the state of Pennsylvania, and settled in the Kanawha Valley, about 1787, there were still a few bands of marauding Indians, which occasionally gave the settlers some trouble. There were four girls in the Van Bibber family: Chloe, Myrian, Hannah and Margarie, running in age from about six to fourteen years. During one of these hunting excursions, a band of Indians had killed two of Morris children, on Peter's Creek, in what is now Nicholas county, one evening when they had gone for the cows. About the same time, another band of Indians captured and carried off one of the Van Bibber girls. Months after her capture, Captain Van Bibber learned that she was still living, and had been adopted by a band of Indians and was then in the northwestern territory in what is now the state of Oregon. Upon learning of her whereabouts, he went in person on horseback into Oregon, and purchased her freedom by delivering to the Indians a horse-load of furs, and brought her home with him to the Kanawha Valley. On this trip Van Bibber has a personal encounter with a massive Indian, who, after they had exchanged shots, tried to take Van Bibber's gun away from him, and with each man a hold of the gun the Indian was so strong that he could lift Van Bibber up in the air, and he swung over the Indian's head, but with his mighty grip, still hung to the rifle gun, and finally wrenched it from the Indian's grasp. This extremely strong grip is remarkable in the hands of the Van Bibbers to this day, and when a many with Van Bibber blood in his veins shakes hands with you, he invariably displays a sample of what has been known as the "Van Bibber Grip."
During her stay with the Indians this Van Bibber girl had been tattooed on the face by them. She later married either a son or a nephew of Daniel Boone’s and they settled at what is now Booneville, in the state of Missouri, which town is now named for them.
And the writer of this article, who is a great grandson of Mathias Van Bibber, who was the son of Captain Van Bibber, has seen a picture of this old Missouri lady about twenty years ago in Kansas City, Missouri. This picture was taken when she was 95 years old; and the tattoo marks were brought out plain in the picture, and looked like great burned scars which extended up and down her face on each side of the nose, and were perhaps three inches long about one-fourth inch wide.
On his trip to Oregon, and return, Captain Van Bibber was gone for 84 days, and since in those days there were no calendars, he whittled out a small piece of laurel root about three inches long and about the size of a pencil, which he whittled our square, and attached it to his shot pouch by tying it there with a buckskin string. On the corner of this stick he cut a notch for each day he was gone. This stick is still attached to the old Van Bibber shot-pouch, which is now in the Department of Archives and History, at the Capitol Building, in the City of Charleston, West Virginia, and can be seen there, together with the old Van Bibber buffalo gun and the Van Bibber razor – together with the Van Bibber Spinning wheel.

About forty years ago, these articles (objects) were secured from David Van Bibber, who then resided in Nicholas County, West Virginia, by David M. Hill, his nephew, of Belva, West Virginia, a son of Dr. Moses Mann Hill, late of Culpepper County, Virginia, and by O.D. Hill, his grandnephew of Kendalia, West Virginia, who brought these articles from Van Bibber’s home in Nicholas County, West Virginia, and delivered them to Dr. John P. Hale, who ws the then representative of the West Virginia Historical Society.

Although the stick which Van Bibber whittled out, upon which to place the notches which kept a record of his time spent on his trip to and from Oregon is more than one hundred years old, the eighty-four notches are still visible on the small piece of wood which Van Bibber had whittled out of a laurel root, and by which he kept a daily record of the number of days it took him to go to Oregon and back in the redemption and reclamation of his daughter, who had been stolen and carried away by this roving band of Indians, and who later married a kinsman of Daniel Boone and established the town of Booneville, Missouri.

In 1882 the information contained in the above articles were verbally given to me in person by my great uncle, David Van Bibber, who was the brother of my grandmother, Mrs. Doctor Moses Mann Hill. He, David Van Bibber, was the son of Mathias Van Bibber and the grandson of Captain John Van Bibber. At the time this information was given to me, he resided in the old Van Bibber home about four miles west of the town of Summerville, in Nicholas County, West Virginia, At that time David Van Bibber was about 90 years old. For a man of his age, he ws in fine physical condition; his mind was alert; his memory of these events was perfectly clear, and these stories as told by him were accurate, clear and convincing; and to me, as a descendant of the Ban Bibber family, were of much personal interest.

My father, George W. Hill, who was a grandson of Mathias Van Bibber, at one time had a part of the uniform which Captain Van Bibber wore when he was an officer of the Army in Holland. It had on it the insignia which showed his official rank and also had the brass buttons containing the seal of the Government of Holland. [End of Account Inserted by O.D. Hill]
Aug 17, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The New York Times relates the circumstance of Mr. Henry P. Van Bibber of Washington city, being in New York on the 24th ult., at the Astor House, and being accosted by a young man who pretended he had been introduced to him at Brown's hotel in Washington, accompanied him to several public houses, and finally to a house which proved to be a gambling den, where the young man proposed a game of faro, to which Mr. V. Bibber demurred, as he had never played, but finally consented, and was introduced to several of the inmates. Ale was called for and drank, and though Mr. V.B. suddenly felt his head begin to swim he continued to play until he had lost $300. They then accompanied him to the Metropolitan Hotel, where all hands dined and drank freely of champagne, and in the afternoon, Mr. Van B. procured an advance of $500 on a check, returned to the gambling den and lost all.
Being by this time severely drugged, he remembered nothing until next day, when he returned to Washington, and thither the gamblers followed him, and demanded payment of $500 on the "Bank of America," at the same time presenting a check to that amount, which he had signed. Of the act of signing, however, he had no recollection, and refused to pay. One of the gamblers then exposed the whole affair in a letter to his wife. The insult prompted him to return to New York and prosecute the affair; and on his oath all the parties were arrested and held to bail in the sum of $1,500 each for trail.

Mitchell Daily Republican -- Mitchell, Davison County, South Dakota -- April 25, 1853.
Aug 17, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan NAMES ON THE WALL - "VIETNAM MEMORIAL"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ___
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ______
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
James Henry VanBebber and Ruth Ann Hooker
Jerry Edward VanBeber and Julia Little
Fount VanBeber and ___Wolfe
Eldon Christ VanBeber

Last name: VAN BEBER
First name: ELDON CHRIST
Home of Record (official): EVERGREEN
State (official): CO
Date of Birth: Tuesday, August 14, 1945
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---
Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 17720775
Component: Regular
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 31C20

--- Action ---
Start of Tour: Sunday, March 27, 1966
Date of Casualty: Sunday, June 5, 1966
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (A2) Hostile, died of wounds
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Unknown/Not Reported
The Wall: Panel 08E - Row 013
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro
John Renfro and Elizabeth Wilds
Henry Renfro and Martha McCuiston
Charles Lee Renfro and Mary Grace Hager
Henry Renfro and Sue Hoyle
Jack Dennis Renfro
JACK DENNIS RENFRO
LT - O3 - Navy - Regular
27 year old Married, Caucasian, Male
Born on Apr 22, 1939
From OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS
Length of service 4 years.
Casualty was on Nov 07, 1966
in QUANG NAM, SOUTH VIETNAM
NON-HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY
VEHICLE CRASH
Body was recovered
Religion
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Panel 12E - - Line 39
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 18, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ___________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ____________
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber

Vanbeber, Isaac - Was with Jackson in Battle of New Orleans. Pvt. Dry Branch
cemetery, Colmar, Ky. (No headstone)
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ISAAC VANBIBBER LIEUT. COL. DODGE'S COMMAND, MISSOURI MILITIA.
ISAAC VANBIBBER CAPT. VAN BIBBER'S CO., LOUISIANA MILITIA.
ISAAC VANBIBBER 1 REGIMENT (ANDREWS'), OHIO MILITIA.
JAMES VANBIBBER RANDALL'S BATT'N RIFLEMEN, MARYLAND MIL.
JAMES VANBIBBER 1 REG'T (JAMESON'S) MARYLAND MILITIA.
JESSE VANBIBBER MISSOURI MILITIA.
JESSE VANBIBBER RANGERS, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS.
JESSE VANBIBBER COL. MCNAIR'S MOUNTED REGIMENT, ILLINOIS AND
MISSOURI MILITIA.
JOHN VANBIBBER 4 REG'T (BAYLES') EAST TENNESSEE MILITIA.
JOSEPH VANBIBBER RANGERS, UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS.
PETER VANBIBBER 16 REG'T (PORTER'S) KENTUCKY MILITIA.

**ISAAC VANBEBBER CAPT. VAN BIBBER'S CO., LOUISIANA MILITIA.
ISAAC VANBEBBER 2 REG'T (LILLARD'S) EAST TENNESSEE VOLS.
JACOB VANBEBBER 2 REG'T (LILLARD'S) EAST TENNESSEE VOLS.
JACOB VANBEBBER 16 REG'T (PORTER'S) KENTUCKY MILITIA.
**JAMES VANBEBBER 2 REG'T (LILLARD'S) EAST TENNESSEE VOLS.
**PETER VANBEBBER 16 REG'T (PORTER'S) KENTUCKY MILITIA.
Aug 18, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan HOPEWELL CEMETERY, New York Township, Caldwell County, Missouri

Elizabeth Betty Yoakum and James VanBebber
VANBEBBER, Elizabeth, d. Jan. 6, 1906 aged **96 ys. 9 ms. 2 ds.
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James W. VanBebber and Martha W. Rutherford
VANBEBBER, James W., May 8, 1847 Sept. 18, 1913
Martha, wife of J. W., d. Mar. 23, 1904 aged 57 ys. 5
ms. 8 ds.
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Jennie VanBebber and James A. Reynolds
REYNOLDS, Jennie, 1881-1906
James A., 1881-1971
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Christina VanBebber and Elisha N. Blew
Cornelia Blew:
BLEW, Cornelia, dau. of E. N. & ?, d. Mar. 11, 1875 ? ys. 6 ms. 12 ds.
Aug 18, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Frances VanBibber and Cyrenus
James Estill Cox and Mary T. Harris

CAPTAIN COX, PIONEER, DIES OF GANGRENE:

Captain Cox was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Cyrenius Cox, a pioneer family of Missouri. He was born at Louter Lick, now Minneola, Montgomery county, Missouri, October 13, 1826. He was the second of a family of five children all of whom are now dead. In 1839 he went to St. Louis, and ten years later got the gold fever, and trekked his way to California, over the old Santa Fe trail. He returned home in 1854, and remained one year when he returned to California. He remained in the Golden Gate state until the opening of the civil war when he cast his lot with the Confederacy.
Enlisting in the state troops first under Colonel Guid Thompson, Captain Cox soon after the opening of the war enlisted with Colonel Kirby Smith's regiment, being assigned to Company K. Colonel Smith's regiment formed a part of Shelby's brigade under the division leadership of General Marmaduke. Henry Bert was his captain.

Captain Cox served on detached services at the battles of Springfield, Carthage and Prairie Grove, which were won by the Confederates, with General Sterling Price in command.

Captain Cox's experience in the civil war was extremely varied, while he did not engage in any of the great principal battles of the war. At the battle of Pea Ridge, which was won by the Confederates, Captain Cox was a participant. Shortly after this he was in Arkansas. He was sent from Shreveport, La., to Little Rock with some Negro slaves, in the guise of a trader. When he reached Little Rock he became frightened for fear that the federals would take the Negroes away, so he braved conditions, and forced the federal general in command to give him a pass, and an escort of federal troops to Clearcy, fifty miles away, where he could not be bothered.

In 1862 he was a witness, while stationed with his troops in Marmaduke's division, to a duel with pistols between General Marmaduke and General Walker, which originated over trouble between the Missouri and Arkansas troops, and was a result of Walker demanding full command, basing his claims on the fact that his commission dated a few hours longer than that of Marmaduke.

The duel took place six miles from Little Rock. Walker was so sure of killing Marmaduke, according to Captain Cox's version of it, that he didn't even take his surgeon along. Marmaduke, so he informed the witnesses, did not aim to kill General Walker, but rather to shoot him in the leg. He aimed a little high, however, and shot Walker in the groin. He lingered for some time, and finally forgave Marmaduke, before his death, which occurred in Little Rock.


TAKES CONFEDERATE MONEY


Shortly after this episode Captain Cox sold a large number of cattle for Kirby Smith's command, and the traders inquired as to his preference to United States and Confederate money. He loyally said Confederate money and got an entire wagon load of it. While returning to his regiment, he heard that the war was over and therefore that the Confederate money was of no value.

Following the battle of Pea Ridge the troops with which Captain Cox was serving were reorganized and the enlistments made in the Confederate States of America. It was at this battle that Captain Cox, who was given an ovation by his comrades, which almost made a hero of him. He was in charge of the commissary department of the division, and before the battle, and in order not to give the food to the federals, he took 500 head of cattle and made a detour of 150 miles, around. During this time the battle had been fought by the Confederates on empty stomachs, and when Captain Cox brought the cattle, men fell on his neck as though he were a deliverer. The men were without meat or food for nearly two whole days, and still won the battle. When he returned it was snowing, and near midnight.

It was while on detached service in Texas that Captain Cox received his commission as captain. When he rejoined his regiment he was assigned to complete command of all of the commissary department in Kirby Smith's division.
Captain Cox came to St. Joseph in 1865, and a few months later married Miss Mary Harris, a daughter of one of the wealthiest and most prominent families in Missouri. His mother was a granddaughter of Daniel Boone, the famous scout and Indian hunter.

Captain Cox was the promoter of the old Union line street car company, together with the late Henry Krug and Adolph Steinacher. He acted as superintendent himself for seven years when he sold his interest in the company. He then joined with Joseph Corby and built the present Frederick avenue line, serving as superintendent until the lines were merged into one, and purchased by the present owners of the street railway company.

Last September Captain Cox and his wife made a trip to Louter Lick, three miles from Danville, Mo. It was Captain Cox's first visit back to his birthplace in fifty-three years. The old homestead is still standing. It was built in 1819.
After an illness dating from April 12, Captain James E. Cox, 82 years old, died at 4:33 o'clock yesterday afternoon, at the family residence, 1702 Faraon street. Captain Cox's widow, two of his children and several grand children were present at the time of his death, which was from gangrene.

Surviving Captain Cox, aside from his widow are four children, Mrs. Pierre B. Davis of Rochester, N.Y.; Mrs. William A. Dolman of St. Joseph; James E. Cox Jr., St. Joseph, and W.E. Cox of Chicago. Several grandchildren also survive him. They are Marion Estel Cox, Miss Margaret Cox, and Niel Cox of Louisville, Ky.; Miss Adabooth Dolman and Mahlon T. Dalmon of St. Joseph.
Source: The Saint Joseph Gazette, Saint Joseph, Missouri, June 3, 1908, Wednesday.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Jane Ann Williams
John Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Catherine Malinda Taylor
Ira VanBibber and Eliza Jackson
Alexander VanBibber

Some say Alex VanBibber is the toughest trapper in the whole Yukon. At nearly 80 years of age, he's been trapping here since he was a kid. Now, he's doing his bit to fend off the anti-trapping groups by teaching Yukoners how to use more humane trapping methods. And after being a member of the Yukon Fish and Game Association for 50 years (he signed up in 1946), VanBibber has won the Clay Pugh Memorial Award for sportsman of the year.

"For the past 16 years, people have called for the betterment of trapping," says the stalky, fit resident of Champagne. "The industry had been getting pressure from the animal-rights groups, so the government formed the Fur Institute of Canada and chipped in money to use for more humane traps, quick-killing traps. "It was just to get the anti-trapping people off our backs but you can tell the difference with the quality of the fur now. "The hides are cared for better and the animals are taken more humanely." Yukon trappers must also now check their traps within five days of setting them. In other parts of Canada, it's two or three days.

VanBibber's family originally came from the United States. His father arrived in Skagway from West Virginia in 1898, when the Klondike Gold Rush was in full swing. He worked as a packer on the White Pass and was there when the great slide of April, 1898, killed dozens of people. When he finally reached Dawson City, he found there wasn't enough gold to go around. "He took off into the bush with his brother, who eventually went to Nome, (Alaska)," says VanBibber. "My dad came out to Fort Selkirk and eventually married a native woman, and that's where we come from."

VanBibber went to school in Dawson City and then started working for a gold-dredging company in 1934. But he always returned to Pelly Crossing to trap in the winter. In 1942, he headed to the Whitehorse area to get work during the building of the Alaska Highway. He ended up working on the Canol pipeline project, surveying for a railroad that was supposed to run from Prince George, B.C., to Fairbanks. Eventually, he got on the pipeline survey team. "The army bought seven horses from Johnny Johns in Carcross and we had to walk the horses to Johnson's Crossing and cross the river on the ferry. "We met the survey party there and headed for Quiet Lake and eventually Norman Wells," he says. "It was well over a 500-mile trek. Late that fall, it was slow on the South Canol. "We were going ahead with the horses and the survey party was behind us, clearing survey lines with Cats. There were no axes or chainsaws, they just came through with Cats. "Right behind them, they were building and finishing the roads. You could go back a little ways and drive all the way back to Whitehorse." VanBibber also worked on the refinery in Whitehorse and received a small vial of the first crude oil to arrive in the city from Norman Wells. He has since donated it to the Yukon Transportation Museum.

He started outfitting in 1943, spending 20 years guiding near the Kusawa Lake area. He now lives in Champagne. "I was trapping all along, too -- off and on. In fact, I still trap and I still guide and I'll be 80 on the fourth of April." He says his secret to staying young is spending as much time as possible in the great outdoors. "I guess it's all the fresh air outdoors. It's a great life. I'm drinking good water, getting lots of exercise and I sleep well at night and eat well, too."

VanBibber is teaching his trade to students at many Yukon schools, he says. He also teaches sessions at the Fish and Game Association's camps. "I just like to tell them what the fur industry is all about, that there is no great fear. "It's being managed by the government and there is no depletion of any one species. "It's all being monitored. If the animals were just left to roam, they would multiply so much that they would suffer a worse death by starvation and disease." The kids learn mountain climbing, canoeing, rifle and bow and arrow shooting and first aid. VanBibber teaches them horsemanship and wilderness camping survival as well as trapping. "Living in the North country, it's always handy to know the outdoors and the ways of the bush. "These kids will probably never use it but it's good for them to know. It keeps them out of trouble, too."

And VanBibber is one of the best to teach bush skills. He's been the expert called in for some great adventures. He's climbed with Senator Robert Kennedy, when Mount Kennedy was named to honor his brother, and former president, in 1965. He was also involved in a search for a couple who survived in the bush outside Watson Lake on nothing but snow for 48 days after their plane crashed. He was also part of a team that brought elk back to the Yukon, trucking them here from Elk Island National Park near Edmonton in the early 1950s. But he hasn't been hungry himself. During a "starvation trip," where VanBibber had to take 25 soldiers out into the bush with only shotguns, he outsmarted the group. "I had a .22 so I just walked ahead of them all and started filling up my pack with rabbits and grouse," he says. "The last group at the back there was living pretty slim. They missed a few meals."

VanBibber has received the Order of Canada. He mentions it as an afterthought but admits he can't remember whether it was in 1983 or 1993. He seems more proud of the sportsman of the year award. "I was surprised they picked me. I just enjoy working with young people."
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Births.

"Henry V. Van Bibber
born in Charleston Dist.-S.C.
February 8th 1798."
"Nancy E. Leak now Van Bibber
born Nov 27 1799."
"Thomas H. Van Bibber
born December 14th 1830"
"Sarah J. Leak
born January 5th 1834"
"Mary Louisa Duvall Van Bibber
born October 5th 1855."
"Henry William Van Bibber
born August 27th 1857."
"Nancy Jessie Van Bibber
born Nov. 7th 1859"
"James K. Thrower, Jr.
born June 19th 1884"
"William Henry Thrower
born December 11th 1885"
"Thomas Van Bibber Thrower
born September 4th 1887"

Marriages.

"Henry V. Van Bibber
married to Nancy E. Leak April 9th 1817"
"Thomas H. Van Bibber
married to Sarah J. Leak, November 30th 1854"
"James K. Thrower and Nancy Jessie Van Bibber were married Sept.26 1883"
"William H. Van Bibber and Gladys Merel were married April 3rd 1884"

DEATHS

"Nancy E. Van Bibber
Died November 7th 1853"
"Thomas H. Van Bibber
Died in the City of Houston Texas, January the 25th 1861 of typoid (sp) fever. He left evidences of having obtained the Pardoning Love of God In the midst of Life We are in Death (signed) Henry Van Bibber"
"Louisa Duvall Van Bibber Cook
died Jan 30, 1894"
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Robert Benge was born circa 1760 probably in the Cherokee village Toquo to John Benge and Wurteh, a Cherokee. Robert grew up to be the most notorious Cherokee in history. He was so feared in the central Appalachian areas of present-day Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee, that the settlers admonished their children by saying, "if you don't watch out, Captain Benge will get you."
Toquo was a Cherokee village on the Little Tennessee River in present-day southeastern Tennessee. Robert grew up as a Cherokee, but with his red hair, European look, and his good command of English, he could also pass as a pure Euro-American. He used this double identity to good effect in his raids against the settlers. He was known as Bob Benge, Captain Benge, Chief Benge, Chief Bench, or just The Bench. If he had a Cherokee name, it is not known.
Robert's father was John Benge, an Indian trader who lived among the Cherokee, and his mother was Wurteh who was part of an influential Cherokee family. [Robert's pedigree can be found in the genealogy database, "Our Ancestors."] John was previously married to Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of William Terrell Lewis and Sarah Martin, a prominent family originally from Virginia. Elizabeth's sister, Susannah Lewis married John's brother, Thomas Benge. John and Elizabeth had several children at their home in western North Carolina. These were William Lewis, Sarah, and Obadiah Martin. Apparently, John was also living with Wurteh at his home with the Cherokee (probably Toquo) and had several children born there. These were Robert, Utana "the Tail," Lucy, and Tashliske. After Elizabeth and the Lewis family found out about John's Cherokee family, their marriage was dissolved and Elizabeth latter remarried John Fielder and had other children. Wurteh also had a child from a man whose last name was Gist or Guess and their child became known to history as Sequoyah. Robert and Sequoyah were half brothers.

Date unknown, circa 1777: John Benge, Wurteh, and their family moved with Dragging Canoe to the south near the southern border of Tennessee [from Evans, 1976].

Date unknown, after 1777: Robert Benge lived at Running Water Town in Tennessee next to the northwestern border of Georgia. Here he was befriended by the Shawnee Chiksika, an older brother of Tecumseh. A small group of Ohio Shawnee were there to assist Dragging Canoe in his efforts against the whites. Robert and several Cherokee joined the Shawnee in their attacks against white settlements especially in the upper Holston River area of northeastern Tennessee and southwestern Virginia. Robert was thought to be Shawnee by some because of his association with this band. His skills in these raids elevated his rank among certain of the Cherokee and Shawnee [from Evans, 1976].

June 29, 1785: The cabin of Archibald Scott and Fannie Dickenson Scott (of Castle's Woods) on Wallen Creek in present-day Lee County, Virginia was attacked by thirteen Indians coming from Wallen Ridge. At nighttime the Indians broke down the door and shot Archibald who died. The Indians then tomahawked and scalped all four of the children. They carried Mrs. Scott outside, packed their booty and then burned the house. At this time she heard the name Benge spoken several times by some of the Indians. A white man with the Indians told her that he was Hargus [what is his last name?] and had taken up with the Indians (he had committed a crime and joined the Indians to escape punishment). During the night they headed north, crossed Wallen Ridge, and headed up the Powell River valley. By daybreak they entered Big Stone Gap and went up a tributary to the north flowing from Black Mountain near the present-day Kentucky-Virginia line. On the northern side of Black Mountain in present-day Kentucky, the chief divided the booty equally and sent a party of nine to head for the Clinch River settlements in order to steal horses. The other four traveled northward. On the eleventh day of the attack, the four Indians stopped at their rendevous to wait for the other nine. Three went hunting leaving Mrs. Scott with the oldest of the group. She escaped from the lone Indian and traveled through the rugged wilderness for many days traveling along the Big Sandy River, through the gorge at Pine Mountain and finally, on August 11, 1785 she broke through the wilderness at New Garden in the upper part of the Clinch River. [from Addington, 1966, p. 88-96; sources were: Virginia State Papers, vol. IV, p. 40; Freeman's journal, Philadelphia [Dec. 15, 1785]; and Journal of Francis Asbury] [It is unknown whether Robert Benge was a member of this Indian party.]

1788: John Sevier led a group of whites to attack Cherokee towns. Robert saved many of the Cherokee of Ustalli (Ustally) Town by evacuating them before and during the attack. Ustalli was located in southwestern North Carolina on the Hiwassee River very close to present-day Tennessee. Five of the Cherokee rearguard were killed while trying to bide time for the evacuees, and the white militia captured one young boy. John Sevier and his men burned the town and attempted to run down the evacuees. Benge set up an ambush at the mouth of Valley River which delayed the attackers and allowed the Cherokee to reach safety. However, at this point, the little boy who had been captured was "brutally murdered" by Thomas Christian who was quoted as saying "Nits make lice."
Sevier and his men went to the Cherokee village of Coota-cloochee and started to burn down about a hundred acres of corn. However, the Cherokee John Watts, with four hundred Cherokee warriors arrived, forcing a retreat of Sevier's men [from Evans, 1976].

Circa 1788: Robert Benge was married to a Cherokee woman and settled at a site still called Benge's Field just south of present-day Trenton, GA. This was the Cherokee village called Lookout Town [from Evans, 1976].
Robert was reported in many publications to have married Jennie Lowrey and his brother, Martin was reported to have married Eliza Lowrey, her sister. However, the two Benges who married the Lowery sisters were the nephews of Robert who had the same name and were the sons of Robert's half brother, Obadiah Martin Benge. Some of the children reported as Robert Benge's were the children of his nephew. It is thought that Robert was married and did have children, but their identity is uncertain [Oleta Benge Kite, personal communication, 1995-1997].

1789: Earlier, the Cherokee had attacked the ___ Brown family on their flatboat [where?]. Three children had been captured. John Sevier had also captured some Cherokee on Flint Creek. Robert Benge was visiting at the Cherokee village of Nickajack in southernmost Tennessee or in northwestern Georgia when an exchange of prisoners was proposed. The two older white children, Joseph and Polly Brown were in the area and ready to be exchanged, but the little girl (name unknown) was held by a recalcitrant Cherokee at Crow Town, about thirty miles away in present-day northeastern Alabama. The Cherokee who held her refused to give her to a messenger sent to pick her up for the exchange. Robert Benge heard of the trouble, got on his horse with his war axe and said "I will bring the girl, or her owner's head." The next day, Robert appeared at Nickajack with the little girl [from Evans, 1976].

"Sometime in the year 1789, John Wallen built a small cabin at the mouth of Stock Creek where Clinchport is situated now. He located his cabin on the Kentucky Path, and, no doubt, helped to entertain some of the hundreds of settlers who were at that time emigrating to Kentucky over the Wilderness Road. Wallen was not left long in the peacable enjoyment of his new home in the wilderness. Benge and his forest bloodhounds soon found his cabin. One morning just at daybreak, his wife, on opening the door, was shot at by an Indian and slightly wounded. Quickly closing the door, she barred it to prevent its being forced. Wallen, who was yet in bed, then hastily arose and snatching the gun from its rack, shot and killed the Indian nearest the door. The other Indians then rushed upon the house, trying to effect an entrance, nor did they retreat until Wallen had killed three of them. After driving the Indians away, Wallen and his wife went to Carter's Fort, eight miles distant. (Carter's Letter, Draper Manuscripts.) [from Addington, 1977, sent by M. J. Arthur]" [It is unknown whether Robert Benge actually participated in this raid, although it was attributed to him.]

Summer of 1791: At the Cherokee town called Running Water in present-day southernmost Tennessee, Robert Benge announced that he was going to start a raiding campaign against white settlers in southwestern Virginia. Five men joined him and they proceeded northward [from Evans, 1976].

Summer of 1791: At the Cherokee town called Running Water in present-day southernmost Tennessee, Robert Benge announced that he was going to start a raiding campaign against white settlers in southwestern Virginia. Five men joined him and they proceeded northward [from Evans, 1976].

August 23, 1791: Robert Benge's group raided the William McDowell house near Moccasin Gap (Russell Co., VA). Two whites were killed and an 8-year-old boy and woman were captured [from Evans, 1976].

August 26, 1791: Benge's group raided the Elisha Farris house. Four whites were killed and Nancy Farris, a 19-year-old girl, was captured [from Evans, 1976].
"August 26, 1791, a party of Indians headed by a Captain Bench, of the Cherokee tribe, attacked the house of Elisha Ferris, two miles from Mockison [sic] Gap, murdered Mr. Ferris at his house, and made prisoner Mrs. Ferris and her daughter, Mrs. Livingston, and a young child together with Nancy Ferris. All but the latter were cruelly murdered the first day of their captivity." [Bledsoe et al, in Summers, 1903, p. 438]

Spring of 1792: Robert Benge led raids on the upper Holston River in present-day northeastern Tennessee and Virginia [from Evans, 1976].

April 6, 1792: Robert Benge's group attacked the Ratcliff settlement. Four whites were killed [from Evans, 1976].
Spring and Summer, 1792: A militia company commanded by Captain James Cooper was formed to protect the settlers against Indian attacks and they patrolled the area of Hawkins Co., now in northeastern Tennessee. The presence of the militia company prevented further raids in the area. Robert Benge was reported to have been seen in several areas of eastern Tennessee during this time, but the militia never came in contact with him [from Evans, 1976].

September, 1792: Robert Benge and his brother, Utana ("The Tail") visited Hiwassee Town in southeastern Tennessee. They were heavily armed and traveling north. They announced that they were going to kill John Sevier. They never located him [from Evans, 1976].

October 2 or 3, 1792: Robert and Utana "The Tail" Benge reached Black's Blockhouse at the head of Crooked Creek of Little River [Knox Co., NC (now Blount Co., TN)]. This fort "was commanded by a sergeant from Captain Crawford's Company. The Benge brothers reached the fort about an hour after dark. Part of the garrison was sitting out of doors by a fire, with no thought of danger. Both brothers fired and, changing their position, quickly reloaded and fired again. This procedure was repeated, giving the impression that they were a much larger force. Two of the militia by the fire, George Moss and Robert Sharpe, were killed, and John Shankland was wounded. James Paul was killed inside the blockhouse. During the shooting three of the white's horses were killed, but Benge [Robert] and his brother were able to capture seven of the animals which they took back to the Lower towns with them." [from Evans, 1976; also from "History of Blount County," p. 10 (thanks to Jean Sharp).]

Circa 1792: "On another occasion, Benge [Robert], with a small war-band, ambushed a party of whites traveling from Southwest Point to Nashville. The group consisted of seven men, a boy and four women. One of the Cherokees fired too soon, alerting the whites. At the sound of the shot, the seven men set spurs to their horses and fled at top speed, leaving the women to their fate. The four women were too terrified to move. Benge approached them and, speaking in English, told them they would not be hurt. He shook hands with each of them, assuring them that they were safe. One of their horses had bolted and Benge caught it an tied it to a tree. He then built a fire for their use, and courteously took his departure. Four of the white men did not slow their horses until they reached Nashville. The other three, when they were sure the Cherokees were gone, returned to the women and escorted them the rest of the way in safety." [Evans, 1976].

January 22, 1793: Robert Benge, his two uncles, Doublehead [Taltsuska] and Pumpkin Boy [Iyahuwagiatsutsa] and several other Cherokee, in retaliation for the Cherokee defeat at Buchanan's Station, went into the "barrens" region of southwestern Kentucky. [This was a region with little water because of the large number of sinkholes, i.e. a karstic plain. It was also thought to have been burnt in the past to provide grassland for bison.] They set up an ambush at one of the few watering holes, Dripping Spring, along the Nashville-Kentucky road. Captain Overall and a Mr. Burnett were proceeding south on the road with nine packhorses loaded with provisions (whiskey, salt, etc.) for the settlements along the Cumberland. Both were killed in the ambush and their scalps were taken. "…The whiskey they found was regarded as a pleasing bonus for the victory. After making liberal use of it, Doublehead made a suggestion which shocked even his battle hardened companions. He calmly drew his knife and began cutting strips of flesh from the bodies of the two white men, proposing that the Cherokees join him in the ancient Iroquoian ritual of 'eating their enemy.' This type of ceremonial cannibalism was the means by which the northern Iroquois enhanced their reputations as fierce warriors. After several rounds of reciting their own war exploits and consuming the booze, their ferociousness was second to none and Benge and the others followed Doublehead's example by partaking of the hearts and brains of their victims. The deed was done with little sense of ceremony, but rather as a deliberate atrocity, well calculated to strike terror in the hearts of the Cumberland settlements." [Evans, 1976]

After January, 1793: Robert Benge, Doublehead and party returned to the Lower Towns and planned to form larger war parties against the whites along the Cumberland River [Evans, 1976]. Robert and two or three others set out for Virginia in March [from Evans, 1976].

Sometime in March, 1793: "In the month of March, 1793, a considerable band of Indians were seen on the headwaters of the Clinch river attempting to steal horses. The Indians finally succeeded in stealing eight horses, and made off toward the Ohio. In the meantime Major Robert Crockett proceeded to gather a company to pursue the Indians, and while engaged in gathering them in he directed Joseph Gilbert and Samuel Lusk, two scouts, to follow the Indians, and, in case they found them, to give him information.
"Gilbert and Lusk had not followed the Indians more than an hour, when they came to a lick, at which the Indians had concealed themselves waiting for deer or elk. As soon as the scouts approached the lick they were fired upon by the Indians, and Lusk was wounded in the hand. Gilbert turned and started to run, when Lusk called him to stay and save his life, if possible. Gilbert, fired with all the noble instincts of true manhood, turned and shot the first Indian dead on the spot. The Indians surrounded him, and, his gun being empty, he dropped it and drew his hunting knife, and attacked the Indians with such spirit that they dared no longer get within his reach; but they used their tomahawks with such effect that he soon lay dead by the side of Lusk, who was now reviving. The Indians scalped Gilbert and carried Lusk off a prisoner. Major Crockett and his force came up after some time, but they were too late to accomplish any good." [Campbell, in Summers, 1903, p. 436-437]

Circa March 15, 1793: "..several emigrants were killed on the Kentucky road. Captain Andrew Lewis, to appease the settlers who were about to break up, placed a sergeant and twelve men at Dump's creek." [Summers, 1903, p. 434-435]

March 20, 1793: "…a party of Indians numbering twenty-three appeared upon the frontiers of Wythe and Montgomery, frequently showing themselves, to the terror of the inhabitants. John Davidson was murdered by them and a number of horses were stolen from Wolf creek, Bluestone and Island creek. The Indians made their escape, except a small party entrusted with the care of about eighty horses, from Island creek. This company was pursued by a large party from Bluestone and another from the head of Clinch, and were overtaken the next day, at the mouth of Little Cole, at what is called the Island of Guyandotte, where they were attacked by the whites. Three of their number were killed and scalped, all the horses retaken, with the arms and blankets of a part of their warriors. The number of Indians concerned in the murder of John Davidson at the Laurel fork of Wolf creek was about twelve. This party of Indians carried off a number of horses from that neighborhood and passed with them in daylight through the heart of the Bluestone settlement."" [Summers, 1903, p. 435]

March 31, 1793: The small Benge group set up an ambush along a road near the top of Powell Mountain in present-day Lee County, Virginia. Three white men were leading a pack train down the mountain. "…As the whites drew closer Benge [Robert] recognized their leader as Moses Cockrell. Cockrell was a loud mouthed ruffian, whose reputation as an 'Indian Fighter' in the Holston area was similar to that which Overall had formerly enjoyed on the Cumberland. Cockrell was a large man, and very vain of his size and strength. He had frequently boasted that he would relish an encounter with the notorious 'Captain' Benge in personal combat, and had in profane terms predicted the outcome for the amusement of many tavern audiences. Benge had heard of his boasts, and grimly determined to give Cockrell an opportunity to make good his words. He instructed his men to shoot Cockrell's companions, but to leave the big man for him. The ambush was successful, and Cockrell's friends fell at the first fire.

"Leaving his rifle behind, Benge sprang from the bushes with his tomahawk in his hand. Cockrell immediately recognized Benge from his red hair. In spite of his vivid descriptions of what he would do upon meeting Benge, Cockrell could only think of flight. He dashed down the mountainside, crashing through the underbrush like a wounded buffalo, with Benge in close pursuit.
"Two miles away, in the valley of Wallen's Creek, was a settler's cabin. Cockrell felt that his only hope for escape lay in reaching that cabin, and to this end he drove his strength to the utmost limits. Although he was handicapped by the weight of two hundred dollars in silver at his belt, the big fellow managed to stay a few steps ahead of Benge. At last, by a desperate effort, he reached the clearing. Benge was only a few feet behind when Cockrell vaulted the rail fence surrounding the cabin. As Cockrell jumped, Benge threw his tomahawk. The razor sharp axe stuck in the top rail of the fence, and the white man reached the safety of the cabin. Not knowing how the house might be guarded, Benge withdrew to join his companions on the mountain, leaving Cockrell to nurse his wounded pride. The big man continued to be a source of amusement in the local taverns, but after this, the laughter was of a different sort." [Evans, 1976].
The story as told by Summers (1903) follows…"The trouble with the Indians began at the opening of spring in the year 1793. On Sunday about the first day of April, Ensign Moses Cockrell and two men were passing from Rye Cove to Powell's Valley, with several loaded horses. On the top of Powell's mountain they were fired on by twelve Indians. The two men who accompanied Cockrell were shot dead on the spot, and Cockrell himself was pursued to the foot of the mountain. Two of his horses were killed and all the loads lost."
"Captain Neal, with a party, pursued the Indians but did not succeed in overtaking them. The Chief who led this company of Indians was a half-breed Shawnese [actually Cherokee] by the name of Benge. A writer in speaking of this occurrence says: "He was remarkable for his strength, activity, endurance and great speed as a runner. He was a man of more than average intelligence also, as well as of great bravery and strategy, and had more than once approached the settlements so stealthily and by a route so secret that he fell upon the scattered settlers without an intimation of his approach and retired to his wigwams beyond the Cumberland without leaving a trace of the route he had traveled, though rangers were constantly on the lookout for his trail. One of these rangers of the Holston settlements was a man by the name of Cockrell, and the writer must make a digression to record an incident in his history. He was famous for his size, activity and handsome person. Benge and himself were rivals in manhood and woodcraft, each jealous of the other's prowess and courage, and both anxious for an occasion to meet in single combat. Not many months before Benge's last incursion, they met on top of Powell's mountain, in what is now Lee county, each with a band of followers. The Indians were in ambush, having observed the approach of the whites, who were not aware of their proximity, and Benge instructed his companions not to kill Cockrell, so that he himself might run him down and capture him. At the crack of the Indian rifles two or three of Cockrell's companions fell; seeing which and at once comprehending the folly of a combat with dozen savages, he sprang away down the mountain side, like an antelope, with Benge in close pursuit. Two miles away in the valley on Wallen's creek was the cabin of a pioneer, in reaching which Cockrell knew was his only chance of escape. Having two hundred dollars in specie in a belt around him, he found he was carrying two much weight for a closely contested race, and that Benge was gaining on him. Making a desperate effort, however, he increased his speed a little, and as he leaped the fence that surrounded the cabin, Benge's tomahawk was buried in the top rail before Cockrell reached the ground. Benge seeing that he had missed his aim, and not knowing how many men and rifles might be in the cabin, fled back to his companions, sadly disappointed.
"A few years after this Cockrell died on the north fork in this county, and during the 'wake,' while his body lay in the cabin, an old comrade who had been in many a hard pinch with him, thus gave utterance to his thoughts and feelings as he paced the puncheon floor in great sorrow: "Poor Cockrell, he is gone! He was noble fellow after Injuns and varmints, and I hope he has gone to where there is as much game and as desperate good range as he had on Holston!" [from Summers, 1903]

First week in April?, 1793: "During the same week [as the attack on Cockrell], fourteen persons were killed on the Kentucky road, near the Hazel Patch. The whites discovered the Indians and attempted to secure the first fire, but failed, and only two of the whites made their escape. The Indians lost five dead, and one white man with them killed. Both parties broke and ran at the same time in opposite directions." [Summers, 1903, p. 434]

April 1793: "…the same chief ['Captain Bench'] with a party of Indians, attacked and murdered the family of Harper Ratcliffe, six in number, about eight miles west of the above-mentioned gap [Mockison Gap, sic]. [Bledsoe et al, in Summers, 1903, p. 438]

April 20, 1793: "Colonel Isaac Bledsoe was killed on Cumberland in the month of April, and on the 20th of the month, a skirmish took place between twenty Indians and eight white men at Laurel river, in Kentucky, in which skirmish the white people were all killed, except McFarland, who escaped, and a number who were wounded." [Campbell in Summers, 1903, p. 436]

June 12, 1793: Cherokee chiefs and delegates appointed by President George Washington were holding a meeting to discuss peace prospects at the Cherokee town, Coyatee (at the mouth of the Holston, southwest of Knoxville, TN). A renegade white militia, led by Captain John Beard, charged into town firing upon Indian and white alike. Major Thomas King was sleeping with Chief Hanging Maw's daughter and had to jump out of a back window of their cabin to avoid death. Other government agents, James Ore and Daniel Carmichael were fired upon but they escaped harm. The Cherokee Fool Charlie, Betty Kitegista, and four others were killed. Chief Hanging Maw, his wife, and the daughter of Nancy Ward were wounded in the attack. The remaining government delegation were finally able to convince Beard and his men to halt their attack, spare the rest of the Indians, and to not burn their town. Beard was later arrested and was brought to a military court, but was acquitted, probably because of his friendship with John Sevier [from Evans, 1976].

July 17, 1793: "…Bench with two other warriors traversed the settlement, on the north fork of Holston for upwards of twenty miles, probably with the intention of making discoveries where were negro property. In this rout they fired at one Williams, and took prisoner a negro woman, the property of Paul Livingston, who after two days captivity made her escape." [Bledsoe et al, in Summers, 1903, p. 438]

Summer, 1793: Beard's attack and subsequent acquittal caused the Cherokees to elevate their attacks on white settlements. Chief John Watts called for warriors to gather and the largest Cherokee war party in history. Robert Benge was one of the first among them to volunteer. Also joining were Shawnees from Running Water in southern Tennessee and a large group of Creek enlisted by Chief Doublehead [from Evans, 1976].

Summer?, 1793: As the war party moved north, Nettle Carrier [Talotiskee] and his brother, Pumpkin Boy went ahead to scout. The scouts approached the blockhouse at Ish's Station which was commanded by John Sevier. The two were spotted by sentries and Pumpkin Boy was shot and killed [from Evans, 1976] [Pumpkin Boy was Robert Benge's uncle].

Summer?, 1793: John Watts wanted to target Knoxville, Tennessee because it was the largest white town in Cherokee territory. Chief Doublehead attacked and burned every white cabin along the way, announcing their approach to Knoxville and defeating Watts' plan to make a surprise attack there [from Evans, 1976].

Summer?, 1793: John Watts attacked the fort at Cavett's Station instead. The owner, Alexander Cavett was killed while fighting. During the course of the battle, Watts decided to offer clemency and asked Robert Benge, because of his excellent English, to arrange the cease fire. Robert talked to the settlers and told them that they would be not be killed, but would be traded for Cherokee held captive by the whites. The surviving settlers agreed to the terms. Doublehead, whose brother Pumpkin Boy had recently been killed by Beard's attack, didn't want any whites to survive. He and some of his Creek friends charged the fort as soon as the gates were opened and proceeded to attack the defenseless captives. Robert Benge and Cherokee James Vann tried to save the captives, but they were outnumbered. "James Vann pushed his horse into the surging mob and pulled a small child up behind his saddle. Doublehead immediately rushed forward and smashed the boy's skull. Raising his voice, Vann taunted Doublehead with the name 'Baby-killer,' a parody of the honorable war title, 'Man-killer.' The enraged Doublehead swung his axe at Vann, who was able to turn his horse in time to avoid the blow. John Watts attempted to save another child. He gave young Alexander Cavett, Jr., to three of the Creeks, instructing them to take the boy to a safe place. His efforts, noble though they were, were useless, because the Creeks murdered the boy." [Evans, 1976]

Fall, 1793 [reported as July 17 above]: "In the fall of 1793, a party of eight Indians passed through the thinly-settled parts of Russell county, and captured a negro woman, the property of Paul Livingston, near Big Moccasin Gap, but before they could carry her beyond the settlements she made her escape and reached her home." [Campbell, in Summers, 1903, p. 437]

October 3, 1793: "…On the third day of this month [October] a party of Indians attacked two families who had lately settled on the road through the wilderness, on the Kentucky side of the Cumberland mountain, within three miles of Hawkins' Station. They killed one man and wounded two children, but were driven off by a man who occupied an adjoining house." [Campbell, in Summers, 1903, p. 437]

Fall and Winter 1793-1794: Robert went home to be with his family for the winter and never again allied with John Watts or Doublhead [from Evans, 1976].

Spring, 1794: When the weather started to warm, Robert Benge went to Willstown in northeastern Alabama to get his brother "The Tail" [Utana]. Together they went to Running Water Town in southern Tennessee and met up with several other Cherokee warriors. This small group then proceeded northward to southern Virginia to make raids on whites in that area, as they had before [from Evans, 1976].

April 6-9, 1794: The story in Elizabeth Livingston's own words [from interview of Mrs. Livingston by A. Campbell in Summers, 1903, p. 439-441]:

April 6, 1794 "About 10 o'clock in the morning, as I was sitting in my house, the fierceness of the dog's barking alarmed me. I looked out and saw seven Indians approaching the house, armed and painted in a frightful manner. No person was then within, but a child of ten years old, and another of two, and my sucking infant. My husband and his brother Henry had just before walked out to a barn at some distance in the field. My sister-in-law, Susanna, was with the remaining children in an out-house. Old Mrs. Livingston was in the garden. I immediately shut and fastened the door; they (the Indians) came furiously up, and tried to burst it open, demanding of me several times to open the door, which I refused. They then fired two guns; one ball pierced through the door, but did me no damage. I then thought of my husband's rifle, took it down but it being double triggered, I was at a loss; at length I fired through the door, but it not being well aimed I did no execution; however the Indians retired from that place and soon after that an old adjoining house was on fire, and I and my children suffering much from the smoke. I opened the door and an Indian immediately advanced and took me prisoner, together with the two children. I then discovered that they had my remaining children in their possession, my sister Sukey, a wench with her young child, a negro man of Edward Callihan's and a negro boy of our own about eight years old. They were fearful of going into the house I left, to plunder, supposing that it had been a man that shot at them, and was yet within. So our whole clothing and household furniture were consumed in the flames, which I was then pleased to see, rather than that it should be of use to the savages.
"We were all hurried a short distance, where the Indians were very busy, dividing and putting up in packs for each to carry his part of the booty taken. I observed them careless about the children, and most of the Indians being some distance off in front, I called with a low voice to my eldest daughter, gave her my youngest child, and told them all to run towards neighbor John Russell's.
"They, with reluctance, left me, sometimes halting, sometimes looking back. I beckoned them to go, although I inwardly felt pangs not to be expressed on account of our doleful separation. The two Indians in the rear either did not notice this scene, or they were willing the children might run back.
That evening the Indians crossed Clinch Mountain and went as far as Cooper creek, distant about eight miles.
"April 7th, set out early in the morning, crossed Clinch river at McLean's fish dam about twelve o'clock, then steered northwardly towards the head of Stoney creek. There the Indians camped carelessly, had no back spy nor kept sentries out. This day's journey was about twenty miles.
"April 8th. Continued in camp until the sun was more than an hour high; then set out slowly and traveled five or six miles and camped near the foot of Powell's mountain. This day Benge, the Indian chief, became more pleasant, and spoke freely to the prisoners. He told them he was about to carry them to the Cherokee towns. That in his route in the wilderness was his brother with two other Indians hunting, so that he might have provision when he returned. That at his camp were several white prisoners taken from Kentucky, with horses and saddles to carry them to the towns. He made enquiry for several persons on Holston, particularly old General Shelby, and said he would pay him a visit during the ensuing summer, and take away all his negroes. He frequently enquired who had negroes, and threatened he would have them all off the North Holston. He said all the Chickamooga [Overhill] towns were for war, and would soon be very troublesome to the white folks.
"This day two of the party were sent by Benge ahead to hunt.
"April 9th. After traveling about five miles, which was over Powell's mountain, and near the foot of the Stone mountain [near Dorchester], a party of thirteen men under command of Lieutenant Vincent Hobbs, of the militia of Lee county, met the enemy in front, attacked and killed Benge the first fire, I being at that time some distance off in the rear. The Indian who was my guard at first halted on hearing the firing. He then ordered me to run, which I performed slowly. He attempted to strike me in the head with the tomahawk, which I defended as well as I could with my arm. By this time two of our people came in view, which encouraged me to struggle all I could. The Indian making an effort at this instant pushed me backward and I fell over a log, at the same time aiming a violent blow at my head, which in part spent its force on me and laid me for dead. The first thing I afterwards remembered was my good friends around me, giving me all the assistance in their power for my relief. They told me I was senseless for about an hour.
"Certified this 15th day of April, 1794. A. Campbell"
On the subject of the militia's pursuit of Benge, Summers states (1903, p. 441-442): "Vincent Hobbs was a lieutenant in the militia of Lee county, and, at the time in question, he was attending the court of that county which was in session. Upon the arrival of the express with the news of the Indian invasion, the court immediately adjourned and a party was organized upon the spot, under the command of Hobbs, to waylay a gap in Cumberland mountain called the Stone gap, through which, it was supposed, the Indians were mostly to pass. [In this party, besides Vincent Hobbs, were: John Van Bever, Job Hobbs, Stephen Jones, James Huff, James Van Bever, Peter Van Bever, Abraham Hobbs, Adam Ely, Samuel Livingston, George Yokum and ___ Dotson. Also probably present was Capt. William Dorton.] On his arrival at the gap, Hobbs discovered that the Indians had just passed through before him; he therefore pursued with eagerness and soon discovered two Indians kindling a fire; these, they instantly dispatched, and finding some plunder with them, which they knew must have been taken out of Livingston's house, they at once came to the conclusion that these two had been sent forward to hunt for provisions and that the others were yet behind with the prisoners.
Col. Arthur Campbell in Summers, 1903, p. 442-443: "The object of Hobbs was now to make a quick retreat, to cover his own sign if possible, at the gap, before the Indians should discover it, and perhaps kill the prisoners and escape. Having gained this point he chose a place of ambuscade; but not exactly liking this position he left the men there, and taking one with him by the name of Van Bibber, he went some little distance in advance to try if he could find a place more suitable for his purpose. As they stood looking around for such a place, they discovered the Indians coming up with their prisoners. They cautiously concealed themselves and each singled out his man. Benge, having charge of the younger Mrs. Livingston, led the van, and the others followed in succession; but the Indian who had charge of the elder Mrs. Livingston was considerably behind, she not being able to march with the same light, elastic step of her sister. When the front came directly opposite to Hobbs and Van Bibber they both fired, Hobbs killing Benge, and Van Bibber the one next behind him. At the crack of the rifle the other men rushed forward, but the Indians had escaped into a laurel thicket, taking with them a negro fellow. The Indian wha had charge of the elder Mrs. Livingston tried his best to kill her, but he was so hurried that he missed his aim. Her arms were badly cut by defending her head from the blows of his tomahawk. The prisoners had scarcely time to recover from their surprise before the two Livinstons, who heard the guns and were now in close pursuit with a party of men from Washington, came running up and received their wives at the hands of Hobbs with a gust of joy. Four Indians were killed and five had escaped, and it appears they were separated into parties of three and two. The first had the negro fellow with them, and, by his account, they lodged that night in a cave, where he escaped from them and got home.
In the meantime a party of the hardy mountaineers of Russell collected and proceeded in haste to waylay a noted Indian crossing place high up on the Kentucky river. When they got there they found some Indians had just passed. They immediately drew the same conclusion that Hobbs had done, and hastened back to the river for fear those behind should discover their sign. Shortly after they had stationed themselves, the other three made their appearance; the men fired upon them, two fell and the other fled, but left a trail of blood behind him, which readily conducted his pursuers to where he had taken refuge in a thick canebrake. It was thought imprudent to follow him any further, as he might be concealed and kill some of them before they could discover him. Thus eight of the party were killed and the other perhaps mortally wounded."

April 29, 1794: Senior militia officer, Col. Arthur Campbell, sent Benge's scalp to Virginia's governor, along with the letter, quoted in Summers (1903, p. 443):
"The scalp of Captain Benge, I have been requested to forward to your Excellency, as a proof that he is no more, and of the activity and good conduct of Lieutenant Hobbs, in killing him and relieving the prisoners. Could it be spared from our treasury, I would beg leave to hint that a present of a neat rifle to Mr. Hobbs would be accepted, as a reward for his late services, and the Executive may rest assured that it would serve as a stimulus for future exertions against the enemy."
The General Assembly of Virginia send Mr. Hobbs a silver-mounted rifle.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Robert BENGE
1763 - 9 Apr 1794
BIRTH: 1763, Toquo Village
DEATH: 9 Apr 1794, Stone Mountain, Dorchester, Richmond, Virginia
Father: John BENGE
Mother: Wurtea WATTS

NOTE: Watts, Wurteh - 1/4th Shawnee-Cherokee Metis born about 1745-died after 1770 - daughter of Oousta White Owl aka Oousta Great Eagle-1/2 Shawnee-Cherokee & John Watts Sr-white, wife 1st 1758 of Robert Due aka Chief Jolly-1/2 Shawnee Metis, 2nd 1760 of George Gist-1/2 Cherokee Metis, 3rd 1761 of Bloody Fellow-Shawnee, 4th 1762 of John Benge-white, mother with Due of Chief John Jolly/59-3/8th Shawnee-Cherokee Metis, with Guess of Sogwili aka George Guess /60-1/8th Shawnee-Cherokee Metis, with Bloody Fellow of Tahlonteeskee/61-5/8th Shawnee-Cherokee Metis, with Benge of Martin aka Tail/62, Robert aka Bench-Chief Benge/63, Lucy/68, Daughter/69, Richard Benge/70-all 1/8th Shawnee-Cherokee Meti
Killed not long after the Shelby Raids of 1779, after they moved back to North Carolina to live near relatives. Their own son Robert killed them unknowing they were in North Carolina.

Family 1 : Black Fox Daughter CHIPPEWA
MARRIAGE: 1786, Benges' Field, Georgia
Richard BENGE
John (Wagonmaster) BENGE
Mary Polly (Ooloosta) BENGE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

References Cited
Addington, L.F., 1966, Indian stories of Virginia's last frontier. Historical Society of Southwest Virginia, No. III, 135 p.

Addington, R. M., 1977, A history of Scott County, Virginia. Publisher unknown, p. 125, 126.

Evans, E.R., 1976, Notable persons in Cherokee history: Bob Benge. Journal of Cherokee Studies, v. 1, no. 2, p. 98-106.

Summers, L.P., 1903, History of southwest Virginia 1746-1786, Washington County 1777-1870. Richmond, Virginia, J.L. Hill Printing Co., 921 p.


Folklore--Misinformation and untrue legends
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBebber was born ca 1740 in Maryland, son of Peter and Anna VanBebber. The family resided in Pennsylvania before moving to Virginia. In 1756 in Luenburg (Halifax) County Virginia, Peter married Margery Bounds. The Bounds being close neighbors of the VanBebbers. Margery named her son John Jesse after her two brothers. He is later known in life and records as Jesse. The VanBebbers left Halifax County settling in Botetourt (Greenbrier) County, Virginia, about 1771. Peter VanBebber built a blockhouse known as Vanbebber's Fort on Wolf Creek. Several members of the family joined the Army of Colonel Andrew Lewis in 1774 and fought in the Battle of Point Pleasant. Isaac VanBebber was killed in the battle after replacing Colonel Charles Lewis, who had been wounded. Isaac was buried beside Colonel Charles Lewis. The VanBebbers assisted Colonel Andrew Lewis in the building of Fort Blair. In 1776 they helped build Fort Randolph under direction of Captain Matthew Arbuckle.

The families of Peter and John VanBebber, Isaac Robinson and Bridgetts, and George Dixon moved to the border shortly after this date for their names appear on a petition to the Governor of Virginia in 1781 having lived in the area when the garrison was maintained at Fort Randolph. It was during this time of Indian raids that Isaac Robinson, husband of Bridgett VanBebber, and brother-in-law of the VanBebbers, was killed on Crooked Creek (Mason County). The VanBebbers and others had defended the early settlement from Indian attacks. They had an agreement with Andrew Lewis who gave each an acre lot in the Town of Point Pleasant. Peter VanBebber resided on the south side of the Kanawha River. He died in 1796. His sons, Jesse and James, were appointed administrators of his estate in 1797. He left his wife and children, Peter, Jesse, Sophronia, Eleanor, Nancy, James, Matthias, Jacob, Joseph, and Olive. Margery VanBebber lived with her son, Peter, on the French Grant. When he moved to Indiana she went to Missouri where she lived with her daughter, Olive Boone. She died at the age of 104 years and was buried in Nathan Boone Cemetery. Jesse VanBebber was born 1759, in Halifax County, Virginia. He was the only child to remain in Mason County. He fought in the Battle of Point Pleasant with his father, uncles and cousins in the Southern Division under Colonel Andrew Lewis. He served as a Ranger in the defense of Point Pleasant and the Kanawha Valley. When he retired from the Virginia Militia he held the rank of Captain. He married Rachel Greenlee, daughter of Alexander and Anna (Henry) Greenlee, in Gallia Township, Washington County, Ohio, in 1799. Jesse VanBebber built the first cabin on Thirteen Mile Creek, VanBebber district, now Union District. His anecdotes were first published by Henry Howe in 1845 after Howe interviewed him at his home. He died 1852. His widow received a pension for his services. Their children were Isaac and Elizabeth. Elizabeth married Joseph Smith and after his death married Richard Tillis. Submitted by Anna Lutz.

History of Mason County, West Virginia 1987. Pg. 410.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Jane Ann Williams
John Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Catherine Malinda Taylor
Ira VanBibber and Eliza Jackson

At Mica Creek, on the bank of the Pelly River in Canada’s south-central Yukon Territory, stands the old two-story log home of Ira and Eliza Van Bibber. Eight of Eliza’s 16 babies were born there.

Now the big house is silent. Only one of the children – Theodore, the youngest – lives there during the winter. Eliza sits alone by her window overlooking the Pelly, watching the deep, swift waters of the wide river slip by, as the many years of her life have slipped by. During warm summer days, she often sits outside, even closer to the river, on the seat from an overland stage sleigh which once was hauled by horses over the winter trail from Whitehorse to Dawson City. Even when the river is frozen by winter, she sits inside her snug home for hours, gazing upon the Pelly and remembering. Always she remains unperturbed, like a serene island in the midst of the ever-changing river.

Eliza is a Tlingit Indian of the Crow clan, granddaughter of Chief Conone of the Taku Tlingits in the Juneau area. Eliza’s mother, Alice, daughter of Chief Conone, was one of the five wives of Chief Jackson, Eliza’s father. Because another wife was jealous of Alice and threatened to kill her, Alice left Chief Jackson before baby Eliza was born, and joined other Indians making a long trek over to the Yukon River.

Eliza was born in the Aishihik Lake area, probably in the early 1880’s. There is no written record of her birth, but her family believes she is over 90. It was years after her birth that she and her mother registered in the white man’s records and were given the names Alice and Eliza.

When they came to Fort Selkirk, near the mouth of the Pelly River, there were no white men around the deserted site of the trading post, which had been sacked by the Chilkat Indians by 1852 and abandoned by the Hudson’s Bay Company.

In the nomadic way of the Tlingit people, she roamed widely with her mother and her stepfather, and later her half-brothers and sister, Susie, Peter and John. Through the Yukon and Pelly watersheds they hunted, fished and picked berries.

On one trek, when Eliza was very young, her family traveled up the Stewart River, then crossed over onto the Pelly. Eliza recalls that they were camped above Granite Canyon on their way down the Pelly, when she saw a white man for the first time. The little girl was deeply impressed by the stranger’s unfamiliar language and the pale color of his skin. That first encounter with white people remains vivid in her memory.

After Alice’s second husband died, she married Copper Joe, from Copper City on the Yukon River below Fort Selkirk, but they had no children. They lived mainly around Coffee Creek, where Alice died about 1921.

When Eliza was a young girl, she accompanied her mother and step-father to the Aishihik area to attend a potlatch, where, according to custom, her marriage was arranged. Eliza didn't wish to marry the man her parents had chosen. She slipped out of camp early one morning and returned with her uncle to the area of old Fort Selkirk. Several years later, she met and married Ira Van Bibber.

Ira and two of his brothers, Theodore and Pat, had left Chehalis, Washington, to join the stampede to the Klondike in 1898. There were originally from West Virginia.

After spending some time on the gold creeks, Ira and sourdough musher Tom Hebert hauled mail by dog team on the Yukon River between Whitehorse and Dawson City. Later Ira trapped and prospected in the Selkirk area and spent several years on the upper Pelly. In the early 1900's he met Eliza at Selkirk, and that was the beginning of their long adventure-filled life together.

Around 1908, Ira, Eliza and their baby, Leta, traveled to the headwaters of the Pelly and Ross rivers, then crossed the rugged MacKenzie Mountains to the head of the wild, little-known South Nahanni. With Eliza's cousin, Tommy Joe, they spent three years trapping and prospecting on the Nahanni. Their daughter May was born there above the spectacular, higher-than-Niagara, Virginia Falls.

Returning from the South Nahanni in 1911, Ira and Eliza settled on the bank of the Pelly at Mica Creek, about 40 miles above the Pelly's mouth. Here Ira built the big log house in which they raised their family, and trapped, fished and hunted in the Pelly and MacMillan watersheds, where Ira operated a big game guiding business. Van Bibber became a respected name throughout the Territory.

Eliza bore none of her 16 babies in a hospital. Some were born on traplines, some at hunting or fishing camps. Ira assisted at most of the births, and elder daughters Leta and May helped deliver the younger ones. Their first son, Abraham, was born near the head of Ross River, on the long trip back from the Nahanni. Dan was born at Tatimain Lake, and Archie at Beaver Lake. Alex, Helen and a stillborn baby were delivered at Mica Creek, and then John ("J.J.") entered the world at Russell Creek, below the forks of the MacMillan River. Pat was born at Mica Creek, and Kathleen at Selkirk. George arrived at Pelly Crossing, where the Van Bibbers lived for a time. Lucy, Linch, a baby who died at birth and "Dode" (Theodore) were born at the Mica Creek homestead.

Twelve of Eliza's children are still living, 11 of them in the Yukon. All the Van Bibber family have contributed greatly to the development of the Yukon; their exploits and remarkable experiences are both legion and legendary. Alex, for example, is highly regarded as a big game guide and outfitter and as a dog musher in the Yukon Sourdough Rendezvous Races. Lucy and Linch are well-known artists. "Dode" -- who lives with his mother during the winter -- mans a fire lookout tower near Whitehorse in the summer, and despite severe disabilities caused by a crippling disease, is known to have the keenest eyes in the forestry service.

The eldest son, Abe, died in the Northwest Territories about 1933, after traveling from Mayo to Great Bear Lake by dog team during the Eldorado uranium stampede. He drowned while running a net to catch fish for his dogs. Helen died at 14, after contracting tuberculosis in Dawson, where she was attending school.

Across Mica Creek, on a high hill overlooking the valley, their father, Ira, also sleeps, in the undisturbed peace of the Pelly.

Eliza is adored by her numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Although her fine brown features are etched with lines of hardship and sorrow, her twinkling eyes and beaming smile reveal a quick wit and cheerful nature. Despite her dignified bearing, she is friendly and enjoys a joke immensely.

Less than five feet tall, Eliza could stand beneath her husband's out-stretched arm without touching it. Ira always called her "Short," a nickname still used by her many friends, who agree that in stamina, courage and patience, she is a giant. It would take a remarkable person to walk in the petite prints of her wandering moccasins!

Her ties with the past and with the traditions of her Tlingit people and the Crow clan are strong. With obvious pride, she recalls her ancestral background and Tlingit legends, these memories mingling with those of her personal life.

As Eliza watches the Pelly flow by, she recalls trading posts, stampeders, steamboats and settlements that have vanished. She remembers traveling along the river with pack dogs, poling boats, rafts, sleds. Now she sees vehicles speeding along the Klondike Highway through what used to be wilderness. Cars, campers and huge ore trucks roll down a long hill and over a bridge about a mile from her door. But except for a handful of adventurers each summer, the 460-mile river itself is deserted.

Both Eliza and her river have seen many changes. There is sadness hidden deep in the brown eyes that watch the waters rush by. But like the everlasting Pelly, Eliza's memories live on for her, as she will always live in its legends.

ALASKA/magazine of life on the last frontier -- September 1973. Pages 22, 23 & 52.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1901 CENSUS OF CANADA (YUKON)
The Territories, Unorganized Territories, Selkirk (Yukon), f- 78.

HH #
Jackson (Chief) M I Head M 55 Yukon Trapper & Hunter Chief of Tribe
Ellen Wife F " Wife M 45 do
Arthur (Harper) M " Son S 22 do
Emma F " Dau S 12 do
Note: Chief Jackson was the father of Eliza Jackson who married Ira Van Bibber.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and
Jane Ann Williams
John Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Catherine Malinda Taylor
~Ira VanBibber~

Date of Birth: May 24, 1876
Name of Child: Ira VanBibber
White/Colored: White
Male/Female: Male
Alive/Dead: Alive
Place of Birth: Nicholas County
Father's Name: Jackson VanBibber
Mother's Name: Malinda C. VanBibber
Name of Person Giving Information: Malinda C. VanBibber
Relation of Informant: Mother
Nicholas County, West Virginia Birth Book (1855-1904)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THE LIFE OF THEODORE VAN BIBBER
Dode was the youngest child born on March 28, 1930 to Ira and Eliza Van Bibber. He was born in the Van Bibber home at Mica Creek. Dode was baptized by Reverend R. Stringer in front of the Big House. His Godparents were his brother and sister, Pat and Kathleen. Leta, his eldest sister, taught him basic reading and writing skills. This was for a year in Minto then he was self taught. As a young lad, Dode had his own dog team and hunted and trapped at Diamond Lake. He worked with J-Jay surveying for two years and he also worked on the Pelly Ferry with Old Jake Smith for three summers. Forestry was also a large part of Dode’s life as he worked for Forestry at the Heckell Hill Forestry Tower for fifteen years. Another job that Dode held was the Elevator Operator for the Federal Building in Whitehorse.
Dode was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at the age of 12. When the Polio epidemic came to the Yukon in the 50’s, and at the age of 21 Dode was the first in the family to get Polio .
Alex made arrangements for Dode to go to Denver, Colorado, USA for MS treatment. He spent every winter there for many years.
The Family paid Dode’s expenses to go to the Philippines with Dr. Branigan and his group.
Dode moved into the Macaulay Lodge in the late 1980’s. He was the very first resident for the Thompson Center and moved there on September 9th, 1993. It was in these two places where Dode made many life long relationships with the staff and residents. Everyone enjoyed Dode’s stories and singing. (And the All Night Milkshake Parties.)
For the Van Bibber Family Dode has been the one to always demonstrate the Van Bibber humor and good nature even though he suffered from a life long disability. His courage and unflagging good humor is his gift to the rest of us. We have so much to be proud of. Dan says, "That when you are feeling real bad and had a tough day all you had to do was go and see Dode and he would make you feel so good."
SOURCE ; by Ruby Van Bibber

1930 – FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT, ALASKA (FAIRBANKS TOWN)

VANBIBBER, THEODORE HEAD-
M-W-63-M- TRAPPER -WV-WV-WV
LOUISE WIFE-F-W-63-M MO-GR-GR
NOTE: Theodore Van Bibber was the son of John Campbell Robinson Van Bibber and Catherine Malinda Taylor. BROTHER TO IRA.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Daniel Boone and Rebecca Bryan
Nathan Boone and Olive Van Bibber
Delinda Boone and James Craig

For two or three years past a large brick building has been used as a gambling and tippling shop, and so long have the best citizens been trying, in various ways, to rid themselves and neighbors of this intolerable nuisance. -- Several indictments have been found against the dramsellers, but somehow they have managed to evade their just punishment from the law. The establishment had come to be a favorite resort of many fathers, husbands, and interesting young men engaged in the various mills and work-shops of the town. Every pains had been taken by the proprietors to make it attractive to the young and thoughtless. But fortunately a certain lady mistook the "Nine Pin Alley" for the Postoffice, (being in a similar building nearby,) in which she caught a glimpse of certain obscene paintings hanging along the Alley. The report of this exhibition was the beginning of war. A few resolute women, asking no favors of the "lords of creation," but feeling a grievous burden of women's wrongs, called a Council of Ladies, and quickly decided upon a plan of operations. They selected for their Captain the daughter of Col Boone, famous for his victories in the Black-Hawk War, and grand-daughter of Daniel Boone, Kentucky's boasted pioneer. And she was a Captain of the first blood, sure. They first issued and posted their notices that this nuisance must be suddenly removed, and that the building, with it's contents, would be entirely destroyed, by armed force, if necessary, on the 24th inst., between the hours of one and two o'clock P.M. "Brag & Holdfast" had made various threats of shooting the woman who dared strike the first blow: that the dangerous guns were all ready, &c. But these threats served only to rouse the indignation of the injured wives and mothers. As soon as the hour arrived some sixty women, armed with sledge-hammers, crowbars, and battle-axes, assembled on the common, then marched boldly up to the liquor ship in battle array. A gentle rap on the door was given by the Captain, but admittance being refused by a strong lock she plied the sledge-hammer, when the doors and windows immediately gave way to the well directed blows of the Light Infantry. When the decanters were well broken, and the whiskey and brandy barrels were emptied and destroyed, the brave Captain gave the following toast, vis: "Where is the man with the 'dangerous gun' --- his powder is wet and his courage has failed."

Then they commenced breaking in the sides of the building, and pulling out, with large ropes, some ten feet square of brick at a time, till the whole building fell in one mass of ruins. A multitude of the - so called - sterner sex offered their assistance, but none was received till the building, with its contents, was well nigh ruined. It was the work of the ladies, and to them the praise belongs. It was evident, however, that they had the approbation of nine-tenths of the lookers on. When the work was thoroughly done the company marched up before the door of the Postoffice, and passed the following resolution. Vis:

Reso'ved, That we, the ladies of Hanover, watchful of the character and welfare of our fathers, husbands, and sons, will put a decided veto upon the future sale of intoxicating liquors in our town, as a beverage, and will totally demolished - as we have done this day - the first liquor shop know to be established in our town.

Three cheers were then given to the ladies of Hanover, a large flag hoisted, and several cannons fired, when the crowd gradually dispersed. The ladies have offered to give a list of their names if it would accommodate those threatening to prosecute.

Taken from the fourth column on page 1, of the April 29, 1856 Edition, of the Galena (Illinois) Daily Advertiser. A similar Editorial appears in the Northwestern Weekly Gazette, May 6, 1856. Edition.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibbers Rock
From West Virginia (WV)
On the south side of the Kanawha River, opposite Glen Ferris in Fayette County, is Van Bibbers Rock, from which Reuben Van Bibbers is said to have leaped into the waters of the river to escape from a band of Indians pursuing him.

According to some accounts, the rock was called War-kun-gee-tah by local Native Americans, meaning "the far away look out." The huge boulder juts out about 100 feet over a seething whirlpool at the foot of the Kanawha Falls. Following his leap, Van Bibbers was rescued from the swirling waters of the Kanawha by his wife, who managed to secure a canoe after witnessing her husband's plight.

Van Bibbers' leap apparently occuried sometime during the early years of the American Revolution. Van Bibber is said to be the first white settler to establish a cabin in this area of the Kanawha Valley, in the "latter part of the 18th Century," and is said to have kept a pet brown bear, called "Brownie", that he had raised from a cub.

Retrieved from "[external link]"
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan 1. Rodelle Henrietta Van Bibber
m. Frederick William Hase, July 12, 1876, Linn Co., MO.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
2. Benjamin Franklin Van Bibber
m. Sarah Harriett Lash, February 16, 1888, Clay Co.,
MO.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
3. Ruth J. Van Bibber
m. Francis A. Kelley, December 6, 1883, Emporia, Lyon Co., KS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
4. William Lee Van Bibber
m. Sarah Jane Currens, March 30, 1886, Alma, KS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
5. Verlina A. Van Bibber
m. Eugene J. Smith, August 7, 1884, Emporia, Lyon Co., KS.
Verlina had 7 children by Eugene.

2nd m. Verlina A. Van Bibber
m. Tim Donovan, July 3, 1908, Emporia, Lyon Co., KS.
Verlina had 1 known child by Tim, it is said that she had 10 children total.
3rd m. Verlina A. Van Bibber
m. William W. James, Date and Location unk.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
6. Omsby Mitchell Van Bibber m. Frances Ann Lash, December 30, 1889, Liberty,
Clay Co., MO.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Washington Hayzlett dedicated this cemetery to the community about the year of 1850. It has continued to be active since that time.

Van Bibber, Clemon, b. 1915, d. 1969
Van Bibber, Katherine, b. 1913, d. 1965
Van Bibber, Sharon Rose, b. 11/10/1946, d. 03/19/1995
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
H. Drenna Carte, 58, of Charleston died Jan. 21, 1997, in General Division, CAMC, after a short illness. She was a sales representative for Riser Foods Inc. with 10 years' service and a graduate of the former Stonewall Jackson High School. Surviving: son, Fred Carte of Cross Lanes daughter, Debbie Fridley of Charleston stepmother, Anna VanBibber Ray of Charleston brother, Danny VanBibber of Columbus, Ohio four grandchildren.
Service will be 11 a.m. Friday at Cunningham-Parker-Johnson Funeral Home with the Rev. Clarence Edens officiating. Burial will be in Hayzlett Cemetery, Sod.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Nancy Malinda VanBebber and Canada Hodge Rogers

Deposition in support of his application for his Union Army pension:

My name is Canada H. Rogers, my age is 59 years, my Post Office is Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tenn. I am a farmer. I was a 2nd Lieut in Company C, 1st Regiment Tenn Infantry. In December 1861 while at London, Ky I was taken sick with fever and went to the house of George Miller, a citizen. I was treated by Dr. Rogers, assistant surgeon of my regiment and afterwards by Dr. Doak, a civilian. I remained at Miller's house about 8 weeks when I joined my company at Summersette, Ky. just before the battle of Mill Springs. I did not go upon duty until Feby 1862. In November 1862 while on detached service I was captured by a rebel command under Major Montgomery and placed in prison in Knoxville, Tenn. where I remained until Jun 1863 when I escaped by jumping from a window 15 feet from the ground. I again joined my regiment at Lancaster, Ky about the last of June 1863 and went on duty.

In the winter of 1863-4 while with my company in Meigs County, Tenn I was attacked with rheumatism which I believe was caused by exposure while a prisoner in Knoxville. I went to the house of a man named Gaddis and remained there about 3 weeks. I was treated by a citizen physician whose name I have now forgotten. I was troubled with rheumatism more or less from that time until I was discharged from the service on the 17th day of September 1864 and from then until the present time.

In 1869 I became ruptured. My physician Dr. Lewis informed me that it was caused by weakness. I know of no other cause for it. After my discharge from the service Drs. Crank and Lewis treated me. Since my discharge from the service I have followed farming, having it carried on for me. I have never since my discharge been able to do any heavy or fatiguing labor. When I enlisted I was a healthy, able-bodied man and was entirely free from rupture or rheumatism. I have lived in Claiborne County for 47 years last past except about 12 years I lived in Campbell County a few miles distance from my old home in this county. I think Dr. Mitchell is the doctor's name who treated at Gaddis' house.
Canida H. Rogers
Subscribed and sworn to before me and I certify that I have no interest in this matter; this 8 day of July 1885.
H. Ritchie, Clerk
From the pension files of Canada Hodge Rogers, claim #544753.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The following are the names of VBs who I have serving in the Confederate States Army. This list was taken from the Consolidated Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers: I HAVE MADE THE ADDITIONS.

VB, Andrew D. - Co. D, 22 Virginia Inf. 1st Kanawha Reg. Pvt - Pvt
IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and
Jane Ann Williams
Andrew Donnally VanBibber

Name: Andrew D. Van Bibber
Enlistment Date: 30 May 1861
Side Served: Confederacy
State Served: Virginia
Unit Numbers: 773
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 30 May 1861.
Enlisted in Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Virginia on 30 May 1861.
On rolls on 30 April 1863 (No further record).
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, F.J. - Co. 3 Battery (Benton's) Louisiana Light Artillery. Pvt - Pvt
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, F.J. - Co. G Confederate Guards Regiment Louisiana Militia. Pvt - Pvt
Regiment Name 3 Battery (Benton's), Louisiana Light Artillery.
Side Confederate
Company
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. 3rd Batty. (Benton's) La. Lt. Arty. Roll of Prisoners of War of furloughed and detailed men, C. S. A., Paroled Shreveport, La., June 7, 1865. Res. New Orleans, La.
Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. Co. G, Confed. Grds. Regt. La. Mil. Roll for March 8 to April 30, 1862 (only Roll on file), En. March 8, 1862, New Orleans. Roll states Present. Note: Transfd. by Gov. Thos. O. Moore to Maj. Gen. M. Lovell. C. S. A., for local defense Page 906 of the City of New Orleans and its approaches.
I think this F. J. Van Bibber is the Son of Henry Van Tromp Van Bibber. The census taker scribbled his first name. The best I can make it out is FLASRIN. Here are the letters I can make out FLAS?I?.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, Jacob - Co. C, 27 Texas Calvary. Pvt - Pvt
PENSION #: S6482
COUNTY: Hardin
UNIT: 1st Tex. Legion (Cav.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, James M.R. - Co. D, 22 Virginia Inf. 1st Kanawha Reg. Sgt - Pvt
James M. R. Van Bibber (First_Last)
Regiment Name 22 Virginia Infantry
Side Confederate
Company D
Soldier's Rank_In Sergeant
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, John C. - Co. D, 22 Virginia Inf. 1st Kanawha Reg. Pvt - Pvt
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and
Jane Ann Williams
John Campbell Robinson VanBibber
Name: John C. Van Bibber
Enlistment Date: 08 October 1862
Side Served: Confederacy
State Served: Virginia
Unit Numbers: 773
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 08 October 1862.
Enlisted in Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Virginia on 08 October 1862.
On rolls on 30 April 1863 (No further record).
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, Land - Co. H, 15 Texas Cavalry, 2 Reg't Johnson's Brigade. Pvt - Pvt
NOTE: "Lando" Lando died from wounds he recieved.
The Son of Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour. "Lando VanBibber," born 1839 in AR.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, Nathaniel B. - Co. D, 22 Virginia Inf. 1st Kanawha Reg. Pvt - Pvt
Regiment Name 22 Virginia Infantry
Side Confederate
Company D
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, S. - Missouri State Guard. Pvt
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VB, Samuel - Co. I, 27 Louisiana Inf. Pvt - Pvt
Van Bibber, Samuel
REGIMENT: 27th Louisiana Infantry BEGINNING RANK: Private ENDING RANK: Private
REMARKS:
ENLISTMENT/MUSTER-IN/DISCHARGE DATA
ENLISTMENT DATA-------- ENLISTMENT #: 1
REGIMENT: 27th Louisiana Infantry COMPANY: I
RANK: Private
MUSTER-IN DATA
DISCHARGE DATA
POW DATA___NO. 1
DATE CAPTURED: 05/25/1865 PLACE CAPTURED: New Orleans LA
DATE PAROLED: 06/09/1865 PLACE PAROLED: Shreveport LA
NOTE: I think this is the Son of Henry Van Tromp Van Bibber Nancy E. Leak.
Source: Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers & Confederate Commands, - Vol. I-III (3)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina __________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna __________
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Ewing A. VanBibber and Sarah Courtney
Samuel C. VanBibber

VB, Samuel C. - Co. K, 1 Missouri Calvary. Pvt - Pvt
NOTE: Samuel died while a prisoner of war.
Vanbibber, Saml C, CO K 1ST MO CAV, Confed P/W Died At Ft Delaware Delaware
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
Elizabeth Betty Yoakum and James VanBebber
Nimrod C. VanBebber and Adaline Borden

April 30, 1889 -- Declaration for Invalid Army Pension, Johnson County, Kansas. Nimrod C. Van Bebber, age 46 years; thus, born about 1843, appeared before W. T. Pugh, Clerk of the District Court, and gave his Declaration for Invalid Army Pension. After being duly sworn according to law, Nimrod stated that he was the identical Nimrod C. Van Bebber who was enrolled in the Service of the United States on the 5th day of February 1862, as a private in Company D, 6th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Calvary, commanded by Samuel E. Turner; that he was Honorable Discharged at Springfield, Missouri, on March 21, 1865. His personal description at enlistment was -- age 22 years, height 5'8", fair complexion, hazel eyes, auburn hair.

At a place called Sedalia, Missouri, in May 1862, he contracted measles with resulting disease of eyes from being exposed to contagion of same. At Sedalia, Missouri, summer 1862, he contracted typhoid fever with resulting disease of spine from exposure incident to army life. Also, summer 1862 at Sedalia, he contracted chronic diarrhea from debility, bad water and badly cooked food. He was in the hospital at Sedalia in May, June, July and August 1862.

He then stated that he had not been employed by the Military or Naval Service of the United States other that that stated. His post office was Shawnee, Johnson County, Kansas.

He signed his Declaration "Nimrod C. Van Bebber".
It was witnessed by Stephen H. Morton of Shawnee, Kansas, and J. P. Allen of Oletha, Kansas.
May 31, 1889 -- Original Invalid Claim #495, 650 in the case of Nimrod C. Van Bebber.
Rate $6.00 a month to commence May 31, 1890.
Claim approved for chronic diarrhea, disease of eyes and spine.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan James VanBibber and Sarah Margaret Bradburn
Charles Wesley VanBibber and Emma L. Lowder
Lola VanBibber and Bradford Cobb


Nicholasville Ky., Oct. 21 -- (Special)
A Jessamine County man shot and critically wounded a women café operator early, telephone for three ambulances, then killed his wife and himself.

Sheriff Roger Williams reported Bradford Cobb, 54, fatally shot his wife, Mrs. Lola Van Bibber Cobb, and wounded Mrs. Margaret Askins, 47, operator of a Nicholasville café, the Tap Room, before committing suicide.

Shortly before 1 a.m. Cobb called his sister-in-law, Mrs. Shirley Cobb. She said Cobb told her: "Call three ambulances. I have killed one women and you will find her at the gate. I am going to kill my wife and by the time you may get here, I'll be dead myself".

Deputy sheriff Vince Hager was notified by the sister-in-law and he called Sheriff Williams. The authorities where enroute to the Cobb home on the Carrs Ferry road east of here in the Chrisman Mill section, when Cobb's son, Gene, arrived at the scene and found Mrs. Askins lying by a gate leading to the Cobb farm.

When Sheriff Williams, Deputy Hager and Coroner Frank Bishop arrived at the Cobb home they found the slain's women two-year old grandson sitting on a chair near the two bodies playing with the weapon---a 22 caliber pistol. There were still four cartridges in the gun. The sheriff said Cobb evidently reloaded three times.

The coroner said he questioned Mrs. Askins, but was unable to get a full statement from her. When asked where she was shot, she replied, "by the gate." Bishop said.

He reported the woman was asked if she had been in the Cobb house before the shooting and answered, "He took me out there."

Mrs. Askins was reported tonight to be in critical condition at Good Samaritan Hospital, Lexington. Hospital authorities said she was wounded in the left chest, right breast, left elbow and right little finger.

Sheriff Williams said Mrs. Cobb was apparently shot while in bed in the upstairs of the home. After shooting his wife, Cobb went downstairs in the kitchen, the officer added.

The wife followed her husband to the kitchen, Williams continued, where Cobb shot her again and then took his own life.

Coroner Bishop reported Mrs. Cobb had been shot six times, suffering wounds of the head and throat. Cobb was shot once in the head.

Mrs. Cobb had recently sued for divorce, seeking $10,000 from her husband, Williams said. The couple still lived together, however, he added.

Williams reported Cobb was connected to the café operated by Mrs. Atkins, but said he was not sure what the connection was.

Cobb was a member of the Methodist Church.

He is survived by a daughter Mrs. Henry Becknell, Nicholasville; a son, Gene Cobb, Nicholasville; two sisters, Mrs. Ora Pigg and Mrs. Steven Brumfield, Nicholasville; two brothers, Shirley and Hubert Cobb, Jessamine County, and five grandchildren.

Mrs. Cobb is survived by two daughters, Mrs. John Noe, Nicholasville, and Mrs. Emmett Evans, Columbus, Ohio; two sons, Gene Webb, U.S. Army, and Russell Adkins, Columbus, Ohio; an adopted son, John Proctor, Richmond, Va; two sisters, Mrs. Charles Hamilton, Ohio, and Mrs. Walker Hall, Greenup; four brothers, Charles, Harrison, Morton and Robert Van Bibber, all of Ohio, and four grandchildren.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan 1791 - Daniel Boone
1806 - John Reynolds
1807 - John Reynolds
1808 - John Reynolds
1809 - John Reynolds
1810 - John Reynolds and Claudius Buster
1823 - Van Bibber Reynolds
1825 - Van Bibber Reynolds
1827 - James C. McFarland
1832 - James H. Fry
1833 - James H. Fry
1836 - Andrew Donnally, Jr.
1839 - Van Bibber Reynolds
1853 - A.P. Fry

Identifications:


John Reynolds was the husband of Miriam Van Bibber.

Van Bibber Reynolds was the son of John Reynolds and Miram Van Bibber.

James Clark McFarland was the husband of Alethea Reynolds who was the daughter of John Reynolds and Miram Van Bibber.

James Henry Fry was the husband of Jane Donnally the daughter of Andrew Donnally Jr. and Margery Van Bibber.

Andrew Phillip Fry was the husband of Emily Francis Reynolds the daughter of Charles G. Reynolds and Francis Dawson Slaughter. Francis was the daughter of Goodrich Lightfoot Slaughter and Hannah Van Bibber.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Andrew G. Van Bibber
Regiment Name 2 Batt'n Veteran Res. Corps.
Side Union
Company 97
Soldier's Rank_In Corpl.
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt.
Alternate Name Andrew J./Van Bibber; Andrew/Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Andrew J. Van Bibber
Regiment Name 2 Battery, Indiana Light Artillery.
Side Union
Company
Soldier's Rank_In Pvt.
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Andrew J. Van Bibber
Regiment Name 2 Batt'n Veteran Res. Corps.
Side Union
Company 97
Soldier's Rank_In Corpl.
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt.
Alternate Name Andrew/Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Charles W. Van Bibber
Regiment Name 10 Kentucky Cavalry.
Side Union
Company K
Soldier's Rank_In Q.M. Serg.
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt.
IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
Charles W. VanBibber and Caroline Dewar
Enlisted as a Private on August 15, 1862.
Enlisted in Company K, 10th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on September 8, 1862.
Mustered out Company K, 10th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on September 17, 1863 in Maysville, Kentucky.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina _____________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ______________
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Ezekial VanBibber and Susan Rice
David VanBibber
David Van Bibber
Regiment Name 10 Kentucky Cavalry.
Side Union
Company K
Soldier's Rank_In Pvt.
Soldier's Rank_Out Trumpeter

David Van Bibber
Regiment Name 40 Ky Inf
Side Union
Company K
Soldier's Rank_In Prv
Soldier's Rank_Out Prv
Alternate Name David/Van Biber

THE 14th KENTUCKY INFANTRY"
Roster of the Fortieth Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Mounted Infantry
taken from the Adjutant General's Report
Vanbibber, David Private Company K Mustered out with
company
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
James Van Bibber
Regiment Name 54 Kentucky Infantry.
Side Union
Company F
Soldier's Rank_In Pvt
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jesse Van Bibber
Regiment Name 116 Ohio Infantry
Side Union
Company G
Soldier's Rank_In Mus'n.
Soldier's Rank_Out Mus'n.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jonathan Van Bibber
Regiment Name 116 Ohio Infantry
Side Union
Company G
Soldier's Rank_In Pvt.
Soldier's Rank_Out Pvt.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Oba Van Bibber
Regiment Name 10 Kentucky Cavalry.
Side Union
Company K
Soldier's Rank_In 2 Sergt.
Soldier's Rank_Out 1 Sergt.
IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
Obadiah VanBibber

OBA VAN BIBBER
Service Record:
Enlisted as a Private on August 15, 1862.
Enlisted in Company K, 10th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on September 8, 1862.
Mustered out Company K, 10th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on September 17, 1863 in Maysville, Kentucky.
Note: Charles W. and Obadiah Van Bibber, who were brothers, joined, served, and were discharged from the Union Army during the Civil War on the same dates.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBEVER:
Vanbever, Calvin
Union Cavalry
16th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vanbever, John F.
Union Infantry
42nd Regiment, Missouri Infantry
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vanbever, William
Union Infantry
26th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BATTLE OF POINT PLEASANT

Formation of the Army--Lord Dunmore and General Lewis to form a junction at the Mouth of the Kanawha--Lewis' March from Fort Union--Captain Arbuckle as Guide--Lord Dunmore moves towards the Shawnee Towns on the Scioto--Two Soldiers fired upon by the Indians--The Beginning of the Battle--The 10th of October, the Great Field Day--Death of Colonel Charles Lewis and Colonel Fleming--Tactics of General Lewis--Plan of the Battle--Consternation and Defeat of the Indians--The Dead and Wounded--Cornstalk, the Great Chief, in Command of the Indians--VanBibber's Account of the Battle--The Centennial Celebration--A monument to be erected--The Old Fort.

The battle of Point Pleasant, fought October 10, 1774, between the whites and Indians, during Dunsmore's war, was the bloodiest of all engagements fought on this continent prior to the Revolution.

The army destined for this expedition was composed of volunteers and militia, chiefly from the counties west of the Blue Ridge, and consisted of two divisions. The northern, comprehending the troops collected in Frederick, Dunmore (now Shenandoah,) and the adjacent counties, was to be commanded by Lord Dunmore in person; and the southern, compromising the different companies raised in Botetourt, Augusta, and the adjoining counties east of the Blue Ridge, was to be led on by General Andrew Lewis. These tow divisions, proceeding by different routes, were to form a junction at the mouth of the Big Kanawha, and from thence penetrate the country north-west of the Ohio river, as far as the season would admit of their going, and destroy all the Indian towns and villages which they could reach.

About the first of September, the troops placed under the command of General Lewis rendezvoused at Camp Union, (now Lewisburg,) and consisted of two regiments, commanded by Colonel William Fleming of Botetourt, and Colonel Charles Lewis of Augusta, containing about four hundred men each. At camp Union they were joined by an independent volunteer company under Colonel John Field of Culpepper, a company from Bedford under Captain Buford, and two from the Holstein settlement, (now Washington county,) under Captains Evan Shelby and Harbert. These three latter companies were part of the force to be led on the Colonel Christian, who was likewise to join the two main divisions of the army at Point Pleasant, so soon as the other companies of his regiment could be assembled. The force under General Lewis, having been thus augmented to eleven hundred men, commenced its march for the mouth of Kanawha on the 11th of September, 1774.

From Camp Union to the point proposed for the junction of the northern and southern divisions of the army, a distance of one hundred and sixty miles, the intermediate country was a trackless forest, so rugged and mountainous as to render the progress of the army at once tedious and laborious. Under the guidance of Captain Matthew Arbuckle, they succeeded, however, in reaching the Ohio river, after a march of nineteen days; and fixed their encampment of the point of land immediately between that river and the Big Kanawha. The provisions and ammunition, transported on pack-horses, and the beeves in droves, arrived after.

When the southern division arrived at Point Pleasant, Governor Dunsmore, with the forces under his command, had not reached there; and unable to account for his failure to form the preconcerted junction at that place, it was deemed advisable to await that event; as by so doing a better opportunity would be afforded to Colonel Christian of coming up with that portion of the army which was then with him. Meanwhile General Lewis, desiring to learn the cause of the delay of the northern division, dispatched runners by land in the direction of Fort Pitt, to obtain tidings of Lord Dunmore, to be communicated to him immediately. In their absence, however, advises were received from his lordship, that he had determined on proceedings across the country, directly to the Shawnee towns; and ordering General Lewis to cross the river, march forward, and form a junction with him near them. These advises were received on the 9th of October, and preparation of the troops over the Ohio river.

Early morning of Monday the tenth of that month, two soldiers left the camp, and proceeded up the Ohio river, in quest of deer. When they had progressed about two miles, they unexpectedly came in sight of a large number of Indians rising from their encampment, and who, discovered the two hunters, fired upon them and killed one; the other escaped unhurt, and running briskly to the camp, communicated the intelligence, "that he had seen a body of the enemy, covering four acres of ground, as closely as they could stand by the side of each other." The main part of the army was immediately ordered out under Colonels Charles Lewis and William Fleming; and having formed into two lines, they proceeded about four hundred yards, when they met the Indians, and the action commenced.

At the first onset, Colonel Charles Lewis having fallen, and Colonel Fleming being wounded, both lines gave way and were retreating briskly towards the camp, when they were met by a reinforcement under Colonel Field, and rallied. The engagement then became general, and was sustained with the most obstinate fury on both sides. The Indians perceiving the "tug of war" had come, and determined on affording the colonial army no chance of escape, if victory should declare for them, formed a line extending across the point, from the Ohio to the Kanawha, and protected in front by logs and fallen timber. In this situation they maintained the contest with unabated vigor, from sunrise till towards the close of evening; bravely and successfully resisting every charge which was made on them; and withstanding the impetuosity of every onset, with the most invincible firmness, until a fortunate movement on the part of the Virginia troops decided the day.

Some short distance above the entrance of the Kanawha river into the Ohio, there is a stream called Cooked creek, emptying into the former of these, from the north-east whose banks are tolerably high, and were then covered with a thick and luxuriant growth of weeds.

Seeing the impracticability of dislodging the Indians by the most vigorous attack, and sensible of the great danger which must arise to his army, if the contest were not decided before night, General Lewis detached the three companies which were commanded by Captains Isaac Shelby, George Matthews and John Stuart, with orders to proceed up the Kanawha river and Crooked creek, under cover of the banks and weeds, till they should pass some distance beyond the enemy; when they were to emerge from their covert, march downward towards the point, and attack the Indians in their rear.

The maneuver thus planned by General Lewis, was promptly executed, and gave a decided victory to the Colonial army. The Indians finding themselves suddenly and unexpectedly encompassed between two armies, and not doubting but that in their rear was the looked for reinforcement under Colonel Christian, soon gave way, and about sundown commenced a precipitate retreat across the Ohio, to their towns on the Scioto. The victory, indeed, was decisive, and many advantages were obtained by it; but they were not cheaply bought. The Virginia army sustained in this engagement a loss of seventy-five killed, and one hundred and forty wounded--about one-fifth of the entire number of the troops.

Among the slain were Colonels Lewis and Field; Captains Buford, Morrow, Wood, Cundiff, Wilson, and Robert McClanahan; and Lieutenants Allen, Goldsby, and Dillin, with some other subalterns. The loss of the enemy could not be ascertained. On the morning after the action, Colonel Christian, who had arrived after the battle was ended, marched his men over the battle-ground and found twenty-one of the Indians lying dead; and twelve others were afterwards discovered, where they had been attempted to be concealed under some old logs and brush.

From the great facility with which the Indians wither carry off or conceal their dead, it is always difficult to ascertain the number of their slain; and hence arises, in some measure, the disparity between their known loss and that sustained by their opponents in battle. Other reasons for this disparity are to be found in their peculiar node of warfare, and in the fact that they rarely continue a contest, when it has to be maintained with the loss of their warriors. It would not be easy otherwise to account for the circumstance, that even when signally vanquished, the list of their slain does nor, frequently, appear more than half as great as that of the victors. In this particular instance, many of the dead were certainly thrown into the river.

Nor could the number of the enemy engaged be ever ascertained. Their army is known to have been composed of warriors from the different nations north of the Ohio, and to have comprised the flower of the Shawnee, Delaware, Ming, Wyandotte, and Cayuga tribes; led on by men whose names were not unknown to fame, and at the head of whom was Cornstalk, sachem of the Shawnees, and king of the northern confederacy.

This distinguished chief and consummate warrior proved himself on that day to be justly entitled to the prominent station which he occupied. his plan of alternate retreat was well conceived, and occasioned the principal loss sustained by the whites. If at any time his warriors were believed to waver, his voice could be heard above the din of arms, exclaiming, in his native tongue: "Be strong! be strong!" and when one near hi, by trepidation and reluctance to proceed to the charge, evinced a dastardly disposition, fearing the example might have a pernicious influence, with one blow of his tomahawk he severed his skull. It was, perhaps, a solitary instance in which terror predominated. Never did men exhibit a more conclusive evidence of bravery in making a charge, and fortitude in withstanding an onset, than did these undisciplined soldiers of the forest in the field at Point Pleasant. Such, too, was the good conduct of those who composed the army of Virginia on that occasion, and such the noble bravery of many, that high expectations were entertained of their future distinction. Nor were those expectations disappointed. In the various scenes through which they subsequently passed, the pledge of after eminence then given was fully redeemed, and the names of Shelby, Campbell, Matthew, Fleming, Moore, and others, their compatriots in arms on the memorable 10th of October 1774, have been inscribed characters on the roll of fame.

Having buried the dead, and made every arrangement which their situation admitted, for the comfort of the wounded, entrenchments were thrown up, and the army commenced its march to form a junction with the northern division, under Lord Dunsmore. Proceeding by the way of the Slat Licks, General Lewis pressed forward with astonishing rapidity, (considering that the march was through a trackless desert;) but before he had gone far, an express arrived from Dunsmore with orders to return immediately to the mouth of the Big Kanawha. Suspecting the integrity of his lordship's motives, and urged by the advice of his officers generally, General Lewis refused to obey these orders, and continued to advance till he was met (at Kilkenny Creek, and in sight of an Indian village, which its inhabitants had just fired and deserted) by the Governor, accompanied by White Eyes, who informed him that he was negotiating a treaty of peace, which would supersede the necessity of the further movement of the southern division, and repeating the order for its retreat.

The army under General Lewis had endured many privations and suffered many hardships. They had encountered a savage enemy in great force, and purchased a victory with the blood of their friends. When arrived near the goal of their wishes, and with nothing to prevent the accomplishment of the object of the campaign, they received those orders with evident chagrin, and did not obey them without murmuring. Having, at his own request, been introduced severally to the officers of that division, complimenting them for their gallantry and good conduct in the late engagement, and assuring them of his high esteem, Lord Dunmore returned to his camp; and General Lewis commenced his retreat.

This battle--says Colonel Stuart, in his historical memoir--was, in fact, the beginning of the Revolutionary war, that obtained for our country the liberty and independence enjoyed by the United States--and a good presage of future success; for it is well known that the Indians were influenced by the British to commence the war to terrify the following year at Lexington. It was though by British politicians, that to excite an "Indian war would prevent a combination of the Colonies for opposing parliamentary measures to tax the Americans." The blood, therefore, split in this memorable battle, willing be remembered by the good people of Virginia and the United States with gratitude.

VANBIBBER'S ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE

Mr. Howe also gives the following brief account of this battle, as being related to him by Mr. Jesse Van Bibber, an aged pioneer of this county, who lived upon Thirteen-Mile creek of Kanawha:

"During the action, those troops from the more eastern part of the State, unaccustomed to fighting with the Indians, were all the day engaged in making breastwork at the junction of the Kanawha with the Ohio, so that the army, if defeated, should have a secure retreat. Ignorant of how the action would terminate, they worked as if for their lives. and before the day was finished had a strong fortification erected. When the alarm was given that the Indians were near, General Lewis deliberately lighted his pipe, and then coolly gave the orders to his brother, Colonel Charles Lewis, to advance upon them. The soldiers in Colonel Fleming's regiment used a stratagem that proved very effectual. They concealed themselves behind trees, and then held out their hats, which the Indians mistakenly shat at. The hat being at once dropped, the Indian would run out from his covert to scalp his victim, and thus met a sure death from the tomahawk of his adversary. The whites in this action being all backwoodsmen, were more successful marksmen that the savages; a fact in part owing to the want of the mechanical skill in the Indians, requisite to keeping their rifles in order. At the close of the action, the Indians went off hallooing as if coming on to renew the attack. This stratagem deceived the whites, and enabled them to retreat in more safety. They recrossed the Ohio on rafts, three miles above, near the old Shawnee town."

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF THE BATTLE

On the 10th of October, 1874, a grand celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the battle of Point Pleasant took place; and although not now a part of the legitimate history of Kanawha county, I know that I will be excused for giving a brief account of it, and offering it in continuation of the history of the original battle:

The day was beautiful. The sun smiled upon the vast multitude, who had assembled to witness the anniversary celebration of the last battle on the frontier, and the first battle of the Revolution. Brass bands were present; among the number was the Cornstalk band of Point Pleasant. Sweet music rolled upon the air. Able orations were delivered. The people listened as thought he words spoken were divine. The patriot sires who fell upon that field of blood one hundred years before, were appropriately extolled for their noble and manly virtues. It was a grand occasion, and an effort worthy of the noble citizens of Mason county. It will be remembered for many years in the future as having an intimate and inseparable connection with the battle itself--reviving old memories well nigh obscured by the dust of time.

A movement was then placed on foot to secure a fund sufficient to raise a monument over the graves of the heroes who fell in the battle of "the Point." This was an appropriate movement, and every good citizen should be interested in its success.

Rev. W.E. Hill, of Point Pleasant, has been recently appointed by Governor John J. Jacob, of West Virginia, to solicit the cooperation of the Legislatures of Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky, in the erection of a suitable monument to commemorate the decisive battle of Point Pleasant: and he is now at work, and hopes to succeed in the accomplishment of his object.

The design of the monument indicates that it will, when completed, be an elegant structure. There will be engraves upon its walls the names of all the heroes who fell in the battle. There is also to be a slab in the basement in memoriam of the great and brave Indian Chieftain, Cornstalk, who was treacherously and brutally murdered a few years after the battle, and whose remains lie buried in the court-house yard at Point Pleasant.

FORT AT POINT PLEASANT

A fort was erected at Point Pleasant just after the battle, at the mouth of the Kanawha. It was a rectangular stockade, about eighty yards long, with blockhouses at two of its corners. It was finally destroyed, and a smaller one erected about fifty rods further up the Ohio, on the site of the store of James Capehart. It was composed of a circle of cabins, in which the settlers lived. No vestige of it now remains.
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William H. Rose
Rank: Sergeant
Military: First Battalion 4th Regt.N.C. Continental Line
Enlisted: April 23 1776 to August 1783
He died at the Battle of Point Plesant on October 10, 1774, Va.
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Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Vardaman VanBebber and Ellen Francis Dodson
Henry Gray VanBebber and Sarah Hannah Merrick
James Emeret VanBeber and Mary Margaret Stone

First United Methodist Church Cemetery
This cemetery is more commonly known as the Old Harrisburg City Cemetery.

Harrisonburg, Poinsett Co., Arkansas
VANBEBER, J. Emert, born Feb. 8, 1870, died June 26, 1950
VANBEBER, Mary, born Jan. 17, 1880, died Dec. 30, 1956
VANBEBER, Rex, born 1897, died 1900
VABEBER, Opal, born & died 1901

Mary Margaret Stone was the daughter of John C. Stone and Ann Steele. The
following two tombstones in this cemetery are believed to be the parents of
Mary.
STONE, John C., born 1849, died 1921
STONE, Annie J., born 1852, died 1939
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan New Harmony Cemetery, Hardin County, Tennessee.

VanBibber, Jacob
(14 Feb 1829 - 15 Jul 1929)

VanBibber, Eveline
(22 Sep 1837 - 17 Dec 1925)

Gant, James R.
(14 Jul 1866 - 19 Feb 1952)

Gant, Minnie A. VanBibber
(2 Oct 1871 - 22 Jul 1951)

Identification:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina _____________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour
Jacob VanBibber and Eveline Alexander
Minnie A. VanBibber and James R. Gant

---and---

Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour
Jacob VanBibber and Eveline Alexander
Minnie A. VanBibber and James R. Gant
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Frank Van Beber died Dec. 10, 1903,
buried by Aunt Jane Bailey, died Jan. 22, 1911.
(She was aunt of George Van Beber and sister to his Father Robert.)

Jake Van Beber died Oct.17, 1911

Chadwell Brittain Pridemore died Dec. 26, 1911

Martha Pridemore Van Beber died Feb. 4, 1913

George Van Beber died Dec. 1, 1950

Ben Morris Van Beber died Dec. 11, 1957

Willis Jefferson (Jeff) Holden died Sept. 13, 1960

Hannah Van Beber died Aug. 24, 1961

Edgar (Ed) Franklin Van Beber died Feb. 11, 1967

Gracie M. Van Beber died Feb. 13, 1967, age 74, she was sister to Walter and dau. of Frank & Sallie Van Beber.
Walter Van Beber died

Elizabeth Catherine Brown Pridemore died Nov. 6, 1936 !
Thomas Jefferson Brown died Aug. 31, 1847

Hannah Van Bebber, sister of Robert Van Beber, Bob's grand father, died Jan. 30, 1925 at Enyart, Mo. - she married Charles Poff.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Panthea Grant Boone and Lilburn W. Boggs
William Montgomery Boggs and Sonora Louisa Hicklin

Mr. Wm. M. Boggs, though at present a citizen and property holder in Napa, has in the past held so prominent a place in the annals of Sonoma, that we here notice him. He came out to California with his father in 1846, and acted as captain of the train most of the way. The ill fated Donner party was for the greatest part of the journey attached to his train, and had they so continued would have escaped the horrible fate that overtook them in their snow-bound camp. Mr. Boggs crossed the Sierra Nevada some two weeks in advance of the Donner party, and reached the valley in time to secure shelter for all. He served three months in the Mexican war on this coast as a non-commissioned officer in a battalion of mounted riflemen recruited by himself and A.F. Grayson. The battalion was attached to the command of Lieutenant Maddox of the Marine Corps under Commodore Stockton, and was honorably discharged at Monterey. Mr. Boggs settled in Sonoma with his family, and resided there seventeen years. He was a larger dealer in real estate, some of the finest places in the valley having been at different times owned by him. His eldest son, now twenty-six years old, was born in Sonoma, and is the first American born in California under the national Party. Mr. Boggs moved to Napa in 1863, and has since resided in that city.

Historical and Descriptive Sketchbook of Napa, Sonoma, Lake and Mendocino, Comprising Sketches of their Topography, Productions, History, Scenery, and Peculiar Attractions, by C.A. Meneffe, Napa City: 1873, James D. Stevenson, Ph.D., Publisher, with Index copyright, 1993.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
Sidney VanBibber and Millicent Joanna Raper

Dayton National Cemetery
Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio
Van Bibber, Sidney, d. 02/10/1916, Infantry, CPL,
Res: Cincinnati, OH, Plot: 1 14 28, bur. 02/10/1916

In the roll of Texas veterans living in 1874, he is described merely as "age 77, served in army in 1836. Residence, Victoria, Victoria county, Texas." [Baker's Texas Scrap Book, p. 617.]
VAN BIBBER, SYDNEY Private
Age Lawrence's & Duval's Companies
The name of S. Van Bibber appears on LOMR for Duval's Company, without any notation suggesting that he escaped from the massacre; or was spared by the enemy, and his pay was drawn, Nov. 10, 1840 by David S. Kaufman, as his attorney, on the certificate of Branch T. Archer, Secretary of War, that Sydney Van Bibber entered the service Dec. 9th, 1835, and was entitled to pay to March 27, 1836 as a private, Captain Lawrence's Company. [CMSR No. 181, State Library.]
Col. John S. Ford, (who resided there at the time) recalls that in the early summer of 1836 a sensation was created in the town of San Augustine by the arrival there of William Scurlock and Sidney Van Bibber, who were supposed to have been killed in the massacre of Fannin's men. A company was at once organized under Scurlock, to resist Urrea's expected second invasion. [Ford's Memoirs, U. of T. Library.]
In October, 1840 William Scurlock and Sydney Van Bibber memorialized the Congress of the Republic of Texas
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ____________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
Caroline A. VanBibber and William Smith Kouns

------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1 William Smith Kouns s/o John C. & Elizabeth Smith
b. 26 Jul 1817
d. 16 Dec 1888
bur: Riverview Cemetery, Greenup Co.,KY
m. 21 Oct 1841 Greenup Co., KY Caroline A. Vanbibber
b. 9 Oct 1822 d. 11 Jul 1904
bur: Riverview Cemetery, Greenup
------------------------------------------------------------------------
ISSUES:
2-1-1 Amelia Kouns
b. 1843
d.
m. 11 Dec 1862 George Hockaday
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1-2 Anna W. Kouns
b.26 Mar 1844
d. 10 Feb 1905
bur: Riverview Cemetery Greenup Co KY
m. 27 Feb 1872 John Sidenstricker
moved to Tennessee
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1-3 Mariah Kouns
b. 1847
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1-4 William H Kouns s/o Wm. S. & C. Vanbibber Kouns
b. 7 Jan 1849
d. 18 Jun 1902
bur: Riverview Cem. Greenup Co. KY
m. Fannie Roberts
b. 1855
d. 1939
bur: Riverview Cem. Greenup Co KY

ISSUES:

2-1-4-1 Leroy Kouns
b. 1876
d. 1953
bur: Riverview Cem. Greenup Co KY

2-1-4-2 Ethel Kouns
b. 1879

2-1-4-3 Tanner Kouns
b. 1884
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1-5 Lettie Maude Kouns
b. d. 23 Jul 1851 age 8mo 23d
bur: Riverview Cemetery, Greenup Co KY
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2-1-6 Elizabeth "Bettie" Kouns
b. 1857
d.
m. John Ball moved to Georgia
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hanna Hoover
Mary Malinda VanBebber and Powell Hamilton Sharp

On the 11th day of April, 1855, personally appeared before me Winslow Turner, Clerk of the Circuit Court within and for the County of Clinton, Powell H. Sharp, aged sixty two years, a resident of the County of Dekalb in the State of Missouri who being duly sworn according to law declares that he is the identical Powell H. Sharp who served as Lieutenant Colonel of the 1st Battalion in the Regiment Commanded by Colonel Collins in the Black Hawk War, that he volunteered at Carlinville, in Macoupin County, Illinois, on or about the first of June, A.D., 1832 for the term of three months and continued in actual service in said War for the term of seventy days and was honorably discharged at Fort Dixon in Illinois about the 1st day of September 1832 as will appear by the muster rolls of said company.

He makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the bounty land to which he may be entitled under the Act granting additional bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who have been engaged in the Military Service of the United States approved March 3, 1855. And refers to his former declaration made under Act of September 28, 1850 upon which he obtained a Land Warrant Number 47,776 for 80 acres, which he having legally transferred and disposed of, it is not within his power now to return. He further declares that he has not received a warrant for bounty land under any other Act of Congress nor made any application thereof, than the one above referred to under Act of September 28, 1850, upon which he obtained the said Land Warrant No. 47, 776 for 80 acres.

From the bounty land files of Powell H. Sharp
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
George Yoakum, Jr. and Mary Ann Maddy
Washington Campbell Yoakum and Sophia Pearson Conger
Mary E. Yoakum and John M. Singer

JOHN M. SINGER, blacksmith, wagon-maker and fruit-grower, came to Kansas in February, 1857, and located at Ottumwa, Coffey Co., Kansas. Was engaged in farming until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company H, Ninth Kansas Cavalry, December, 1861. He served four years, and was in all the engagements of his command. Was mustered out in the spring of 1865. Was Second Lieutenant, commanding the company the most of the time. He was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., December 25, 1828. His parents were Samuel and Jane Singer. He left Pennsylvania in 1852. After living at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for one year, he went to California, and thence to Coffey County, Kansas. He was married September 13, 1860, to Hannah M. McCombs, by whom he had one child - Carrie Ellen. His first wife dying October 9, 1863, he again married December 25, 1871, Mrs. Mary Downs, a widow lady, whose maiden name was Zoakum (sp). Her native place was Tennessee. She has three children by her first husband-Fannie, Lewis W. and Mollie Downs. Mr. Singer and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a delegate to the State Convention in 1878, and again in 1882.

History of the State of Kansas by William G. Cutler
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Delinda Boone and James Craig
Nathan Boone Craig
CRAIG, NATHAN B. Merchant; P.O. Hanover; born in St. Charles Co., Mo., June 13, 1822; came with his parents to Galena in 1827; in the Spring of 1828 his father came to Hanover and took up the water power, and commenced at once the erection of a grist mill and a saw mill; the family came on in 1829; his mother was a granddaughter of the celebrated Daniel Boone, after whom the subject of this sketch was named; the family were here during the Black Hawk war; Mr. C.'s father served as Captain of Volunteers during the war, and was honorably discharged at its close; Mr. C. has his old muster rolls now in his possession; he also has in his possession an old family Bible, the property of his grandfather, Nathan Boone; the record of his mother's family is in it; Mr. C.'s first wife was Miss Nancy Chandler; they had six children, only one of whom is living, Mrs. Frances McLaughlin; married the widow Calamer, whose maiden name was Miss Margaret Pilcher; one child living, Olive M.; lost one; married Miss Elizabeth Milburn, born in Ind.; three children, viz.: Eva, Jessie, James E. lost one; owns 527 acres of land.

History of Jo Daviess County, Illinois. (1878) Page #758.
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Descendants of Nathan Boone Craig

1. Nathan Boone2 Craig (James1) was born June 13, 1822 in St. Charles Co., MO, and died January 15, 1907 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. He married (1) Nancy Chandler May 10, 1846 in Jo Daviess Co., IL. She was born December 1824, and died May 16, 1859 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. He married (2) Margaret A. Pilcher December 25, 1859 in Jo Daviess Co., IL. She was born July 30, 1826 in KY, and died May 05, 1863 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. He married (3) Francis Elizabeth Milburn September 02, 1865 in Jo Daviess Co., IL. She was born February 07, 1840 in Mishawaka, IN, and died October 23, 1915 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
Children of Nathan Craig and Nancy Chandler are:
Frances Goodspede3 Craig, born Abt. 1847 in IL; died Aft. 1915. She married Mr. McGlothlin; born in IR.

Emirilla Craig, born August 28, 1849 in Jo Daviess Co., IL; died January 30, 1850 in Jo Daviess Co., IL.

Sarah Craig, born December 15, 1850 in Jo Daviess Co., IL; died October 16, 1852 in Jo Daviess Co., IL.

Josephine Craig, born October 16, 1853 in IL; died March 18, 1854 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.

Belle Craig, born September 02, 1856 in Jo Daviess Co., IL; died September 18, 1856 in Jo Daviess Co., IL.

Dell Craig, born November 03, 1858 in Jo Daviess Co., IL; died April 08, 1859 in Jo Daviess Co., IL.

Children of Nathan Craig and Margaret Pilcher are:
Olive M.3Craig, born Abt. 1861; died Aft. 1915.
Unknown Craig, born Bef. 1863; died an infant.

Children of Nathan Craig and Francis Milburn are:

William J.3 Craig, born July 15, 1866; died December 30, 1867 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
Eva Milburn Craig, born July 10, 1869 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL; died December 25, 1935 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. She married Elmer N. Kuhns February 21, 1890 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL; born July 10, 1863 in PA; died July 31, 1926 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
Jessie L. Craig, born April 04, 1872 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL; died September 16, 1891 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
James Edward Craig, born December 15, 1873 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL; died February 11, 1965 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. He married Jennie L. Jobe February 06, 1895; born 1876 in IL; died December 21, 1956 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
Lee S. Craig, born December 1884; died July 06, 1919 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL. He married Sadie A. Jobe February 26, 1908; born January 20, 1881 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL; died September 04, 1969 in Hanover, Jo Daviess Co., IL.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Edna cemetery, Elm Grove Township, Labette County, Kansas:

Hayes, Almira b. January 29, 1877 d. February 10, 1916
Hayes, Drayton B. b. 1877 d. 1951
Hayes, Frank H. (W.W. Veteran) b. 1901 d. 1929
Vanbibber, Oscar B. b. November 18, 1850 d. April 13, 1937
Vanbibber, Maggie b. July 26, 1855 d. December 4, 1937

Ellis cemetery, Elm Grove Township, Labette County, Kansas:

Van Bibber, Albert b. 1848 d. _________
Van Bibber, Phebe E. wife of Albert b. 1852 d. 1910
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
George Yoakum, Jr. and Mary Ann Maddy
Washington Campbell Yoakum and Sophia Pearson Conger
Lavenia Ann Yoakum and Thomas Jefferson Stout

T. J. STOUT, R. R. and Express Agent, Telegraph operator, Postmaster and grain dealer, came to Kansas November 10, 1868, engaged in railroading till spring of 1869, and then settled in Leavenworth, still in the service of the railroad till March 30, 1870, when he lost his right leg in a railroad accident at Lawrence, Kas., and since his recovery has continued the service at Fairmount as agent. Has been Postmaster since 1872, and Treasurer of his district since 1873. Has also served as Justice of the Peace two terms.

He enlisted in the Third New York Marine Artillery, in August, 1861, and served until they were disbanded in March, 1863. He was on the gunboat Centennial, of Burnside's expedition, along the coast of Virginia and North Carolina; was in all the engagements of his command. He re-enlisted in the spring of 1865, in the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, and was mustered out November, 1865. He was born in Fayette County, Ill., November 18, 1841; son of Phillip and Hannah Stout. He left his native place in 1859, and lived at Amboy, Ill., till his removal to Kansas, in 1868. He was married at Fairmount, September 11, 1872, to Lavinia Yocum, daughter of W. C. and Sophia Yocum. She was born in Athens, Ga., July 28, 1848. Their children are Sydney Ray, Charles Edgar, Phillip Ray, Linton Campbell and Andrew J. The first four are still living. Mr. Stout has been honored as Delegate to county and State conventions.

History of the State of Kansas by William G. Cutler
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro
Marcellus Renfro and Elizabeth Gibson
James Chrisman Renfro and Susan Thrailkill
William Henry Harrison Renfro and Louisa Thompson Witten

W. H. Renfro, a son of J. C. and Susan Renfro, was born near Trenton, March 4, 1841. He now lives on route two. Mr. Renfro married Louisa Witten, daughter of T. G. Witten. They have one child, Nanny M., now Mrs. L. C. Lemley.

Mr. Renfro moved with his parents to Mercer county when one year old. Here they stayed four years, then moved to Trenton where Mr. Renfro, Sr. went into business. They stayed here till Mr. Renfro was twelve years old, then went to farming in Harrison township, where Mr. Renfro now owns a three
hundred and twenty acre tract.

Mr. Renfro was a member of the first militia company organized in this county for the Civil war, Company A, made up at Trenton and Chillicothe, commanded by Captain Garvin and part of Col. King's regiment."

A History of Grundy County, James E. Ford, pp. 426-427, Copyright 1908.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Peter VanBibber and Nancy Mary Devore

Peter VanBibber served as a Private in Captain Benedict Bacon's Company, 16th Regiment, Kentucky Militia, War of 1812. This company was designated at various times as Captain George Bishop's and Captain Benedict Bacon's Company.

The following is from the Bounty Land File of Peter VanBibber. It was received from the National Archives.

Know all men by these present that I Peter VanBibber of the County of Philips and State of Arkansas do constitute, nominate, empower and appoint William H. Hamilton, Esquire of the City of Washington, D.C., my Agent and Attorney in fact with plenary powers to receive the land warrant due me from the United States for my service in the War of 1812, said warrant being due under the provisions of the Act passed September 28, 1850, hereby satisfying what my said agent and attorney may do in the premises in as full and complete a manner as if I were present and to do the same myself.

Given under my hand and seal the 5th day of September 1851 at Sterling, Philips County, State of Arkansas.

/s/ Peter Vanbibber

Attest: W.M. Martin and Samuel Royall.

Sworn and subscribed before me, the 5th day of September 1851.

/s/ M.W. Allen
----------

Sir - Herewith please find the application of Mr. Peter Vanbibber for a Land Warrant under the provisions of Act of September 28, 1850. When the Warrant is issued please send to the undersigned, as per the accompanying Power of Attorney.

Yours, etc.

/s/ Wm. H. Hamilton
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Peter VanBebber and Sarah Grimes
George Marshall VanBebber

February 15, 1887 - George Marshall Van Bebber submitted his declaration for original Invalid Pension. He appeared before the Clerk of the Caldwell County Court and stated that he lived in Polo, Caldwell County; that he enrolled on the 1st of September 1862 in Company G of the 51st Regiment of Missouri Militia, Commanded by Captain W. Milstead. He gave his age as being 49 years. While in the line of duty on September 1, 1863, he incurred injury to his right eye from exposure which resulted in the total loss of his right eye. He was treated at Saint Louis Sister's Hospital from September 1 to September 10, 1863.

Since the end of the Civil War, he had lived in Caldwell County, Missouri. He was a farmer. George signed his Declaration in his own handwriting. The Declaration was witnessed by David A. Glenn and John F. McNew. It was stamped "received" in the Pension Office on February 21, 1887. It had been filed by R.L. Dodge, Attorney, Kingston, Caldwell County, Missouri.

August 4, 1887 - The Bureau of Pensions requested the War Department to provide a full report as to the service, disability, and hospital treatment of George M. Van Bebber. His Invalid Application was given number 598,773.

April 12, 1888 - Examiner William S. Fitch, submitted Invalid Application number 598,733 in the case of George M. Van Bebber, to the Board of Review for "rejection," the reason being that the 51st Regiment, of Missouri Militia was a State organization and the disabilities incurred therein were not pensionable under existing law.

April 17, 1888 - The Board of Review "rejected" Invalid Pension Application number 598, 733 in the case of George M. Van Bebber.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Mrs. Serepta (Lamb) Vanbebber, aged 66 years, wife of G.M. Vanbebber, gashed her throat horribly with a butcher knife in an attempt to commit suicide, at her home on Route 8, about 8 o'clock Sunday afternoon.

Her husband, "Marsh" Vanbebber, started to Wm Lile's early Sunday morning, and soon after his departure Mrs. Vanbebber telephoned to Sam Thomson and wife, who live one-half mile south, stating that she had cut her throat. Mr. And Mrs. Thomson and Mrs. J.G. Mohn hurried to her assistance, and Dr. I.N. Parrish of Cowgill, on arriving at the house, found that she had inflicted three deep cuts in her throat, one of which penetrated the windpipe or trachea, but fortunately had not severed a carotid artery or jugular vein, the opening of wither of which would probably have let out her life in a few minutes. One or two small arteries were taken up and tied, and the wounds, then closed with stitches and dressed. At this writing the cuts are healing nicely, the patient taking nourishment, and prospects are good for her recovery. Three of her daughters, Meads, Griffing, and Dustin, and Miss Anna Vanbebber, have been with her constantly.

Mrs. Vanbebber has lived at her present home for more than 40 years, a most excellent and faithful wife, mother, neighbor and friend. Devotedly attached to the children, the death of her son Walter, some 25 years since, was a sad blow, and the recent despondency which caused her rash act was probably due to the tragic death of her remaining son, Clayt, who was killed by a train near Boulder, Colorado, last fall. We understand that she had prepared a rope and noose, in her smokehouse, with which to hang herself, but for some reason decided to use the knife.

From a Ray County, Missouri newspaper - 1912.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Mahala Boone and Robert Coats Punty

Little has been recorded about Mahala, daughter of Nathan Boone. Discovery of fragments of the tombstone a couple of years ago, which was apparently never placed on her grave, added more data about her short life. The ancestry and career of her husband are found in the old History of Greene County, Missouri. St. Louis, Western Historical Company, 1883, Page 689:

ROBERT COATS PUNTY, M.D. Dr. Punty was the son of Thomas and Sarah (Rives) Punty, and was born in Warren county, Kentucky, July 7, 1820. His grandfather, Robert Punty, was born in Franklin county, Virginia, and emigrated to Kentucky in 1806. His grandfather, upon his mother's side, Burwell Rives was also of Franklin county, Virginia, and came to Kentucky about the same year. Robert Coats Prunty lived in that State until he was nineteen years of age, receiving his education at Bowling Green. In 1839 his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and purchased the place upon which the doctor is now living. His father died September 10, 1860, upon the homestead, and his mother died in McLean county, Illinois, March 18, 1864. Robert read medicine under Drs. Shackleford and Gerham., and began the practice in 1845 at Ash Grove. His health failing he went to Virginia, and on his return stopped in Warren county, Kentucky, and practiced four years in the vicinity of his birthplace. While making his home in Kentucky, he attended the medical department of the Missouri State University, at St. Louis, that department of the University being then in that city, and graduated in 1847. He was married January 18, 1848, in this county, to Miss Mahala S., daughter of Col Nathan Boone, who was the eighth child of Daniel Boone. She died November 2, 1849, leaving one child, now Mrs. Belle Boone Bowden of Springfield. The doctor was married the second time to Miss Olevia Shipp, of this county, in January 1854. She died in 1859, and he married Mrs. Mary F. McGown, on the 22nd of March, 1863. Their union has been blest with four children, viz: Burwell R., Matilda P., Amanda J., and Mary F. In 1863, Dr. Prunty went to McLean county, Illinois, and sold goods at Leroy for some time. He then sold out and practiced medicine at Down's Station until his return to this county in 1868. He practiced two years at Ash Grove, and then moved back upon the old homestead, where he has since been engaged in farming and stock trading."

Boone Pioneer Echoes, Volume 13, Number 2, April 1971, Page 11.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Row Grave Surname Given

17 7 Vanbibber Andy J.
17 8 Vanbibber Violet

Notes from this researcher:
1. Andrew Jackson VanBebber (16 Apr 1896 - 16 Mar 1970)
2. Violet Wilmoth VanBebber (13 Jul 1901 - May 1987)
3. Andrew's first wife was Pearl Hodges whom he married on April 19, 1919 in
Ringling, Jefferson Co., Oklahoma. Marriage Book #4, Page #65.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Hester VanBibber and John Bellville
Nicholas Bellville and Mary "Polly" Kirk
James Bellville and Sarah Fletcher
John Bellville and Margaret Perrin
Martha A. Bellville and Christopher Finkbeiner

Perrysburg Twp. p460 #4]
Enlisted at Perrysburg, Ohio. December 4, 1861 as a private in Company E, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, and went into camp at Fremont, Ohio. At the end of two months Mr. Finkbeiner and his comrades were ordered to Camp Chase, and thence in six weeks to Paducah, Kentucky, via Cincinnati and Louisville. He was discharged August, 1862, at Camp Dennison. July 1, 1863, Mr. Finkbeiner re-enlisted at Perrysburg, entering Company I, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He participated in the Georgia campaign and took part in the battles of Pittsburgh Landing, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Farmington, and Loudon, Tennessee. October 25, 1864 he was wounded near Gadsden, Alabama. He now draws a pension of twenty-four dollars a month for the loss of his right foot by the explosion of a shell. March 16, 1865, he was honorably discharged at St. Louis, Missouri. In Wolford Post, No. 51, G.A.R., he is past quartermaster.

Mr. Finkbeiner was born near the Rhine in Germany, June 9, 1845, the son of Frederick and Mary A. (Audee) Finkbeiner. He married at Perrysburg, January 1, 1867, Martha A. Belleville, born at Perrysburg, November 8, 1847, the daughter of John and Margaret (Perrin) Belleville. Their children were born: Frederick John, November 5, 1867; William Arthur, September 13, 1869; Helen Gertrude, May 20, 1872; and Jessie Bell, November 22, 1883.

Mr. Finkbeiner holds the office of postmaster at Perrysburg, Ohio and is also a dealer in fancy goods.

Wood County's Role in the Civil War, Volume 1 -- 1997 -- Compiled and published by Wood County Chapter of The Ohio Genealogical Society.
Aug 19, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Leavenworth National Cemetery
Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas:

Van Bibber, John,
Plot: 34 14 5,
bur. 03/12/1920

Van Bibber, Norman R,
b. 08/16/1916, d. 01/25/1986,
US Navy, S1, Plot: 45 37 22,
bur. 01/28/1986
Aug 20, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:

1. DANIEL BOONE + REBECCA BRYAN
2. JESSE BRYAN BOONE + CHLOE VAN BIBBER

Jesse Bryan BOONE
died at age: 46
Born: 23-May-1773 in: Yadkin River, RowanCo, NC
Died: 1820 in: St. Louis, MO
Spouse: Chloe VAN BIBBER
Daughter of Peter Van Bibber
b. 13-Aug-1772
d. 1816-1867
Married: 1792 in: MO
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:

1. DANIEL BOONE + REBECCA BRYAN
2, NATHAN BOONE + OLIVE VAN BIBBER

Nathan BOONE
died at age: 75
Born: 3-Mar-1781 in: Boone's Station, Fayette Co, KY
Died: 16-Oct-1856 in: Ashgrove, Green County,
Occupation: farmer
Spouse: Olive VAN BIBBER
b. 13-Jan-1783
d. 12-Nov-1858
Married: 26-Sep-1799 in: Little Sandy KY
The daughter of Peter Van Bibber, whose older daughter Chloe had married Nathan's brother Jesse. The bride, said to be the prettiest girl north of the Ohio River, was sixteen and her youthful husband eighteen when, with stout hearts, they started on their great adventure. They traveled by way of Lexington, Louisville and Vincennes to St. Louis, leaving Little Sandy on October first. "Without any company but my husband," said Olive, "I started to Missouri. We had two ponies and our packhorse." One of their ponies became crippled which detained them in Vincennes almost three weeks; they arrived in St. Louis the last of October and went to St. Charles County. The youthful couple crossed the Missouri River in a skiff which also carried all of their possessions; Nathan rowed the boat while Olive steered and by his bridle guided their swimming horse. They settled twenty miles above the town of St. Charles in the Femme Osage District.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:

DANIEL BOONE + REBECCA BRYAN
SUSANNAH BOONE + WILLIAM HAYS
ELIZABETH HAYS + MAJOR ISAAC VAN BIBBER

SUSANNAH BOONE
BORN 1760, DIED: 1800 ST. CHARLES MISSOURI
MARRIED: WILLIAM HAYS
BORN: 1754, DIED: 1804

ELIZABETH HAYS:
BORN: 1776 DIED: 1828
MARRIED: ISAAC VAN BIBBER
CHILDREN:
1, MATILDA VAN BIBBER + JAMES ESTILL
SON OF BENJAMIN ESTILL & ANNA CLAYNAUGH
CHILDREN:
BENJAMIN ESTILL, BORN 1844, DIED, 1877
MARRIED: ALICE BOLLE DAVIS
ISAAC ESTILL
WILLIAM ESTILL

2. FANNY VAN BIBBER + CYRANUS COX
Aug 20, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan TIDENCE Lane,
son of Richard and Sarah Fuller Lane, was born on 31 August 1724. No other man stands out more in the Lane family than Rev. Tidence Lane. Rev. Lane was the first pastor in Tennessee and has a church named after him and a large monument dedicated to him there. Tidence Lane son of Richard and Sarah was born in the Province of Maryland, near the city of Baltimore, August 31, 1724. He was the grandson of Dutton Lane and Pretitia Tidings, and great-grandson of Major Samuel Lane, an officer in the service of the King of England in the Province of Maryland, in 1680. He was the older brother of Dutton Lane a pioneer preacher in Virginia whom both Semple and Taylor mention in their respective histories of Virginia Baptists and Baptist ministers as a minister of prominence and influence. He was the honored father of Lieut. Issac Lane,who under Colonel Sevier, performed patriotic services at the battle of King's Mountain, Oct 7 1780; who also ,in 1802," gave the land on which was built the meeting house of the first Baptist church organized,; it is claimed in Claiborne county Tenn the church at Big Spring (now Springdale. The resister of St Paul's Parish shows that Tidence Lane was christened "Tidings", from which it would seems that it was his father's intention should be the namesake of his paternal grandmother, whose maiden name was Pretitia Tidings. But later generations of the Lanes have thought Tidence the preferable name, and have adhered to this spelling and pronunciation. In early colonial times the parents of Tidence Lane followed the drift of population from Maryland southward, first into Virginia and then into North Carolina, where they settled on the Yadkin River, not far from the Carolina home of Daniel Boone. Here young Lane grew to manhood. He married Hester Van Bibber, May 9, 1743, To this union were born nine children seven sons and two daughters. About this time, perhaps a little earlier, young Lane was convicted and converted in a most remarkable way, under the ministry of Rev. Shubeal Stearns. Who had been itinerating extensively in Virginia and North Carolina and preaching with wonderful success. Morgan Edwards describes him as a marvelous preacher for moving the emotions and melting his audience to tears. Most exciting stories were told about the piercing glance of his eye and the melting tones of his voice while his appearance was that of a patriarch. Tidence came under the influence of the preaching of Stearns. Until this time young Lane had the most "hateful feelings towards the Baptists." as he confessed but curiosity led him to make a horseback trip of some forty miles to see and hear the famous preacher with the following result, in Elder Lane own words: When the fame of Mr Stearns' preaching reached the Yadking where I lived, I felt venerable old man sitting under a peach tree with a book in his hand and the people gathering about him. He fixed his eyes upon me immediately, which made me feel in such a manner as I had never felt before. I turned to quit the place, but could not proceed far. I walked about, sometimes catching his eyes as I walked. My uneasiness increased and became intolerable. I went up to him, thinking that a salutation and shaking of hands would relieve me,but it happened otherwise. I geban to think he had an evil eye and ought to be shunned, but shunning him I could no more effect than a bird can shun the rattlesnake when it fixes its eyes upon it. When he began to preach my perturbations increased, so that nature could no longer support them, and I sank to the ground. In regard to his call and ordination to the ministry I have no definite information. We find him, however among the first Baptists to set foot on Tennessee soil. He has the distinction of being the first pastor of the first permanent church organization. of any denomination in the state of Tennessee, Buffalo Ridge, in Washington County constituted in 1779, Under this date Ramsay say Tidence Lane a Baptist preacher organized a congregation this year. A house for public worship was erected on Buffalo Ridge.(Annals of Tennessee,p.180)The Nashville American (Sunday Issue, May 16 1897) among the one hundred :prize questions" submitted to its readers, had thus "Who was the first minister who preached regularly to a Tennessee Congregation?"and the prize-taking answer was: Tidence Lane pastor Buffalo Ridge,1779." The Presbyterians generously and frankly concede to the Baptists this priority of date in church building claiming 1782 as the date of their first church organization viz. that of New Bethel Church in the fork of the Holston and Watauga rivers. ( Pioneer Presbyterianism in Tennessee) Benedict ( General History Baptists) places the date of Baptist beginning in the state about the year 1780." Ramsay's date is 1779. While Benedict was a painstaking and thoroughly reliable historian in matters of vital importance and while he visited in person(in 1810) the historic grounds of our Baptist people throughout the country and had therefore, opportunity to investigate their claims and traditions nevertheless, Ramsay, in my opinion, would likely be more accurate in a matter of date being in easy reach of all the sources of information, having ,access to all the records in the state,public and private and having,as he did, a smaller field for study, less subject matter to investigate, more written documents to refer to, and a later date, with its Better opportunities for historical research, then his predecessor had or could have at his early day. Under, date as above (1780) Benedict mentions by name eight Baptist ministers, who moved thus early into "the Holston county ", all of them Virginians, "except Mr Lane, who was from North Carlina. They were accompanied by a considerable number of their brethren from the churches which they left. Among the other emigrants there was a small body,which went out in something like a church capacity. They removed from an old church at Sandy Creek in North Carolina, which was planted by Shubael Stearns, and as a branch of the mother church they emigrated to the wilderness and settled on Boone's Creek( then in North Carolina, now in Tennessee). The church is now called Buffalo Ridge". Tidence Lane, as above stated, was its first pastor. With respect to our tradition that Buffalo Ridge came out from Sandy Creed Church ( North Carolina) in an organized capacity and established itself in its new home as an 'arm' of the mother church, with Tidence Lane as pastor, it may be said that Benedict in 1810 visited both these churches, mother and daughter, and made the record above given. Whether the record and the matter-of-fact way in which it is made, stamps, it seems to me, the tradition as history. Tidence Lane has also the distinction of being"the first Moderator" of the first association of any denomination in the state, the old Holston, organized at " Cherokee meeting -house," in Washington County, on Saturday before the fourth Sunday in October, 1786, ten years before Tennessee was admitted into the Union. After a sojourn in the "Holston county" for some four or five years Elder Lane pushed on toward the west into what is now Hamblem County, making a location on Bent Creek, near the present town of Whitesburg. Here he and Elder William Murphy consituted the Bent Creek ( now the Whitesburg Church," June, the second Sunday, 1785." Elder Lane becoming pastor of the church and continuing pastor as long as he lived. some twenty-one years. At the organization of the Holston Association (1786) Bent Creek Church was represented by Tidence Lane, Issac Barton, and Francis Hamilton. Tidence Lane was chosen Moderator, and was elected to the same position in May and October of the following year. Tidence Lane was active in the ministry, had good organizing and good preaching ability. To use Benedict's language, he was a preacher " of reputation and success." He was much sought in counsel by the churches. He was not so hard in doctrine as some of his brethren, his doctrinal belief being a modified Galvanism. The writer has been searching for Tidence Lane's Bible, which he willed to his son Issac, but it seems to have been lost or destroyed; its successor, however , to which has been transferred some of the entries, doubtless, of the old Bible, has been in the Lane family for more than a hundred years. It gives the dates of the birth,marriage, and death of Tidence Lane,Sr. the subject of our sketch. The Book is now in possession of Mrs. Crocket Williams , of Morristown, a descendant of Tidence Lane, Sr., about five generations removed, and has been handed down to the youngest child of each succeeding generation since 1812. According to this record Tidence Lane and Ester Bibbin (or Bibber, possibly a contraction of Van Bibber) were married May 9,1743. to this union were born nine children, seven sons, and two daughters. Elder T.J. Lane for fifty-four years a member of the Bent Creek (Whitesburg) church and Forty years a Baptist minister, was a grandson of Elder Tidence. Mrs S.B. Allen of Williamburg Va; Mrs R.A. Atkinson of Baltimore Md and Mr H. E Lane, of Whitesburg Tenn all of whom has been interested in furnishing materials for this sketch, are direct descendants of Tidence Lane, of the fifth and sixth generations. Beside these are many others of kith and kin scattered throughout Tennessee and elsewhere who are justly" proud of their ancestor"" Having set his house in order and made his will, the " second day of July,1805", Tidence Lane passed to his reward January 30,1806.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Notes for ESTER VAN BIBBER:
Birth: 1727 Death: 20 JAN 1805 in Whitesburg, Tennessee
Father: Jacob VAN BIBBER Born: 2 FEB 1705/06 at: Cecil Co., MD & Mary UNKNOWN
Burial: 1805, Whitesboro "Jefferson Co., " Tennessee
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Children of TIDENCE LANE and ESTER VAN BIBBER are:
i. ELIZABETH (VAN BIBBER)21 LANE, b. WFT Est. 1745-1771.
ii. MARY (VAN BIBBER) LANE, b. WFT Est. 1745-1771.
iii. WILLIAM (VAN BIBBER) LANE, b. WFT Est. 1745-1771. 45.
iv. AQUILLA (VAN BIBBER) LANE, b. May 18, 1753, Pittsylvania, Virginia; d. November 24, 1819, Jefferson Co., Tennessee.
v. JOHN (VAN BIBBER) LANE, b. 1757, Jefferson Co., Tennessee.
vi. ISAAC (VAN BIBBER) LANE, b. February 14, 1760
Notes for ISAAC (VAN BIBBER) LANE: Lived in Washington Co North Carolina (now Tennessee) near themouth of the Watauga River. After war resided at various timesin Watauga Co N.C. Grainger, Claiborne, and 1832 resided inMcMinn County Tn. Served as private and Lt . Served with Captains Peter Perkins, William Bean, George Russell, andThomas Jarnagin. Served Colonels Christie and Sevier. Widow Sarah Russell Lane recieved 160 acres warrent 34 621. in 1855.

Father: Richard Lane b: 1702 in BALTIMORE CO MARYLAND
Mother: Sarah Fuller b: 7 AUG 1702 in EAST HADDEN CONN
Burial: 1806, Whitesboro "Jefferson Co., " Tennessee
ESTER VAN BIBBER: Burial: 1805, Whitesboro "Jefferson Co., " Tennessee


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 20, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Ewing B. Hensley 4th Sgt.
Co. I, 26th MO Inf
4th Sgt.
Enlisted 19 farmer Medora Osage Jan. 9, 1862

Ewing Van Bibber Hensley was born on September 04, 1842, in Chamois, Osage Co., MO of parents Samuel B. Hensley and Susan Davis Hensley. Susan Davis was a granddaughter of Susannah Boone Hayes, a daughter of Daniel Boone.

In the 1870 Census of Benton Twp., Osage Co., MO (p. 68B) Ewing V. Hensley (27) was listed as living with his wife Sarah R. (17) and children Mary A. E. (2) and Alma A. (7/12).

In the 1880 Census of Benton Twp., Osage Co., MO (p. 399A) Ewing (36) was listed as living with his wife Sarah (38) and children Mary Ann (12), Alice (10), Ernest (7), Letcher (6), Leonard (4), Iva Catharine (2) and Walter (8/12). Also living in the household was Ewing's father Samuel Hensley (79). Ewing was a farmer, and his and Sarah's parents were born in Virginia.

In the summer of 1894 Ewing and his family, together with his son-in-law Harry McDonald, moved by covered wagon from Salina, KS, to Alamosa Co., Colorado. Ewing Hensley died in 1920 in Alamosa Co., Colorado.
Aug 20, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The Gallipolis Tribune, Gallipolis, Ohio - Friday, July 11, 1902
SAD DROWNING -
Geo. Hicks a Young West Viginian Loses His Life Near Addison - Mr. Geo. Hicks, a stone mason, working for the railroad, went with two companions -Leon Hartman and George Van Bibber, in bathing off a raft at the mouth of Kyger Creek two and a half to three miles above Addison Saturday evening and by some means the raft was overturned and carried out of their reach by the current. Hartman and Van Bibber managed to maintain a hold on the raft and get out in some way, but Hicks must have either stuck in the mud on the bottom ot taken a hold of something, which kept him from rising to the surface and was drowned. His body was recovered Sunday morning about 9 o'clock. Coroner Shaw was notified and held an inquest Sunday noon, rendering a verdict of accidental drowning. The remains were prepared for shipment by Undertaker Stewart of Middleport, and shipped to the home of his parents at Gad, Nicholas county, W.Va. on the K. & M. All the men were unable to swim, and the escape of the others was miraculas, Hicks was a fine young man.
Aug 20, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan AKA – Van Bibbers Lick

This was one of the earliest settlements of the county, settled between 1808 and 1810 and so named because of its location near a salt lick on Loutre River. It was also known as Van Bibbers Lick, for Major Isaac Van Bibber, who migrated to MO in 1800 from KY. Here he erected a hotel, some cabins, and stables. He tried unsuccessfully to operate a salt mill.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina __________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ___________
Brigetta VanBibber and Isaac Robinson

The story of Brigetta Van Bibber, member of a pioneer family of West Virginia's earliest days, which has left numerous descendants in the state today and an honorable record, bears further testimony to the heroism of the pioneer women of the state. To live along the frontier was in itself an act of heroism. History of the Van Bibber family tells how "the men worked with rifles strung to their backs. The women stood guard and moulded bullets, blanched with fear, for the intrepid men as they stooped at the loops or met the enemy in the open."

Rhoda, the attractive daughter of John Van Bibber, 19 years of age and possessed of an abundant suit of auburn hair, was killed by Indians in 1787 and her brother, Joseph, was taken prisoner. The girl was scalped and her scalp with its long red hair was taken to Detroit and the British commander of the fort there paid the Indians a bounty of $60 for it. Joseph said afterwards that he saw many barrels filled with scalps of women and children during the years of his captivity.

John and Peter Van Bibber settled in 1781 on the bank of the Ohio river, just below the mouth of the Great Kanawha. Their sister, Brigetta, who had married Isaac Robinson, lived on the north side of the Kanawha, near the mouth of Crooked creek, now in Point Pleasant.

It was only a few weeks after the murder of Rhoda Van Bibber that Indians attacked the Robinsons at their home. Isaac Robinson, a man who was helping him with the farm work, and a baby boy some two years old, were slain. The house was burned, and Brigetta and two sons were taken prisoners. The older boy, Isaac, was about eight and John some four years old. The latter, unable to stand the strain of rapid travel, was slain by the Indians and his little body was left by the roadside where his father's brother, John Robinson, found it a few days later. Two days and two nights, without resting, the prisoners were forced to march and though he tried, Robinson could not overtake them.

One night after a long day's march and before the Indians had reached their destination, somewhere in the vicinity of Detroit, Brigetta Robinson gave birth to a child. Carrying the little one in her arms, she was compelled to keep on the march the next and several other succeeding days. Then the Indians thought the babe to great a burden for the weakened woman, so the beat its head against a tree, threw the body at her feet and left it there as prey for the wild beast as they kept on their way.

Mrs. Robinson was kept for five years in virtual slavery before a French trader bought her release and sent her back to her girlhood home in Botetourt county, Virginia. Meanwhile, Isaac had been carried away to some other habitation of the tribe, so she had to leave him behind, when she started for her old home.

But, three years later, during a period of peace between the Indians and the whites, this woman of iron nerve started back to hunt her son. Two of her children had been brutally killed before her eyes, a third was held a captive by the Indians and her heart yearned for him. In one of the Indian villages where she sought him, smallpox was raging and taking its prey by thousands, and she was stricken. It was many months before she could go on, and she too had to make her temporary home among the Indians.

After his eight years of life among the wild tribe of Indians, she found her son, Isaac, so weaned away from civilization that he refused to return to the white habitations and all the restrictions of conventional life. But, the heroic mother finally won him over after weeks of persuasion, she induced her son to return with her to Point Pleasant. There his health gave way and he lived but a few years, though his mother, Brigetta Van Bibber, born of heroic mold, lived until almost a hundred years of age, and delighted in telling the descendants of her brothers the stories of her early adventures.

But Brigetta Van Bibber and Mary Draper Ingles were not the only mothers who were forced to see their infant children killed or deserted in the days of Indian cruelties. The ways of the Indian sometimes came home to his own people. From Logan county comes the tale of a heroic Indian mother forced by her own people to desert a baby boy, who was found and cared for by a kindhearted white couple, and who grew up to be the head of a distinguished West Virginia family. -- George Summers

The West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia, Volume Twenty-five, Supplemental Series, West Virginia Women. Edited and Published by Jim Comstock, Richwood, West Virginia, 1974. Pages #280 - 282.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Name: Ella VanBebber
Born: 11 Apr 1905
Died: 29 May 2000
Residence: Willits, Mendocino Co., CA

Lineage unidentified as of this printing.
----------
Name: Knoxie VanBebber
Born: 14 Jan 1905
Died: 06 Apr 2000
Residence: San Angelo, Tom Green Co., TX

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Sarah McWilliams
James Nelson VanBebber and Mary Jane Armstrong
Knoxie Pears VanBebber

----------
Name: Larry VanBebber
Born: 12 Sep 1947
Died: 04 Feb 2000
Residence: Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
William VanBebber and Elizabeth Barbee
James Henry VanBebber and Elizabeth Jane Baker
Arval Agustus VanBebber and Julia F. Watson
Vernon N. VanBebber and Opal Reva Bryant
Ralph Randall VanBebber, Sr. and Blanche Lucille Liberty
Larry Nicholas VanBebber

----------
Name: Lonnie VanBebber
Born: 29 Jul 1907
Died: 5 Feb 2000
Residence: Knoxville, Knox Co., TN

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
John M. VanBebber and Nancy Elizabeth Beeler
David Isaac VanBebber and Martha Emmaline Blackburn
William Lonnie VanBebber, Sr.

----------
Name: Lonnie VanBebber
Born: 28 Feb 1940
Died: 22 Feb 2000
Residence: Maynardville, Union Co., TN

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
John M. VanBebber and Nancy Elizabeth Beeler
David Isaac VanBebber and Martha Emmaline Blackburn
William Lonnie VanBebber, Sr. and Virgie Myrtle Seals
William Lonnie VanBebber, Jr.

----------
Name: Maggie VanBebber
Born: 22 Oct 1913
Died: 10 Jul 2000
Residence: Denton, Denton Co., TX

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Sarah McWilliams
John Crittington VanBebber and Martha Virginia Ashton
Clarence William VanBebber and Maggie Irene Ryan

----------
Name: Marian VanBebber
Born: 15 Nov 1917
Died: 11 Jan 2000
Residence: East Alton, Madison Co., IL

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber and Hannah Hoover
James VanBebber, Jr. and Nancy Ann Ferrill
James Henry VanBebber and Martha Jane Hicks
Ernest VanBebber and Myrle Nighbert
Dean VanBebber and Marian Winifred Dilley

----------
Name: Steven VanBebber
Born: 3 Mar 1923
Died: Dec 2000
Residence:

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Margaret Catherine Frazier
Isaac Criss VanBebber and Martha Jane Savage
Andy Newton VanBebber and Anna Lee Scott
Paul Edward VanBebber and Bettye Mitchell
Steven Edward VanBebber

----------
Name: Valerie VanBebber
Born: 16 Dec 1924
Died: 01 Apr 2000
Residence: Duncan, Stephens Co., OK

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Sarah McWilliams
James Nelson VanBebber and Mary Jane Armstrong
Burl Elmer VanBebber and Pearl Hinson
Elmer Burl VanBebber and Lucy Valerie Todd

----------
Name: Alvin VanBibber
Born: 27 Mar 1924
Died: 28 Mar 2000
Resdidence: Evansville, Vanderburgh Co., IN

Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Peter VanBibber and Sarah Yoakum
Jacob VanBibber and ____________
Jonathan VanBibber and Nancy (__________) Creswell
John VanBibber and Isabelle Francis Martin
George M. VanBibber and Ethel O. Conner
Alvin R. VanBibber

----------
Name: Harold VanBibber
Born: 14 Jul 1920
Died: 18 Mar 2000
Residence: Columbus, Franklin Co., OH

Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber and Margaret Jane Allen
Erastus Allen VanBibber and Maggie Markin
Harold William VanBibber

----------
Name: Helen VanBibber
Born: 7 Feb 1910
Died: 21 Jan 2000
Residence: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Co., OK

Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Mathias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Jane Ann Williams
Moses Hill VanBibber and Virginia Ann Holt
Fred Vernon VanBibber, Sr. and Jessie Alice Wookey
Fred Vernon VanBibber, Jr. and Helen Marie Sisson

-----------
Name: Margaret VanBibber
Born: 16 Aug 1911
Died: 01 Jun 2000
Residence: Hebron, Licking Co., OH

Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber and Margaret Jane Allen
Clarence H. VanBibber and Emma Harkins
Raymond VanBibber and Margaret J. Canright

----------
Name: Noah VanBibber
Born: 1922
Died 2 Nov 2000
Residence: Albuquerque, NM

Unidentified as of this printing.
----------
Name: Velma VanBibber
Born: 5 Oct 1906
Died: 26 Jun 2000
Residence: Rolla, Phelps Co., MO

Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Soloman H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
William VanBibber and Frances Ann Thoroughman
Thomas Jefferson VanBibber and Lucy Ollie Hall
Carl Eugene VanBibber and Velma Spencer

-----------
Name: William VanBibber
Born: 10 Feb 1949
Died: 12 Nov 2000
Residence: Golden, McCurtain Co., OK

Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Soloman H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
Ezekial VanBibber and Rebecca Jane Clowers
George Edward VanBibber and Cora Eletha Warren
Benjamin Wiley VanBibber and Oma Snow
William Snow VanBibber

-----------
Name: Crystal VanBeber
Born: 5 May 1913
Died: 30 May 2000
Residence: Chouteau, Mayes, Co., OK

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Jacob Vanbebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
James Henry VanBebber and Ruth Ann Hooker
Arthur Ruthland VanBeber and Celia Charity Bruton
Francis Arthur VanBeber and Crystal Mae Stewart

----------
Name: Roy VanBeber
Born: 23 Aug 1942
Died: 19 Mar 2000
Residence: CO

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
James Henry VanBebber and Ruth Ann Hooker
Jerry Edward VanBeber and Julie Little
Clarence Edward VanBeber and Fannie Elsie Hamblen
Roy Wayne VanBeber

----------
Name: Otto VanBever
Born: 17 Jun 1923
Died: 13 Aug 2000
Residence: Speedwell, Claiborne Co., TN

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber and Hannah Hoover
Isaac Vanbebber and Hannah Long
George VanBeber and Mary Elizabeth Tinsley
James VanBever and Mary A. Robbins
James Boyd VanBever and Nevadia Pitman
Otto VanBever
______________________________________________________________________________
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The Van Bibber family that was the first to settle in the New World was the family of Isaacs Jacob Van Bibber who came to Philadelphia in 1687. He came to America to prepare the way for his parents and the rest of the family that would soon follow. The Van Bibbers were residents of Krefeld (now Germany) and had been persecuted in Europe because they were followers of Menno Simons. Other Mennonites from Krefeld had come to Philadelphia in 1684 at the invitation of William Penn including Herman op den Graff, who was the husband of two of the sisters of Isaacs Jacob. Isaacs Jacob Van Bibber moved to Germantown (now a suburb of Philadelphia) and was engaged in commerce.

It was not long before the rest of the family immigrated to Germantown and resided there and in Philadelphia until moving to Cecil County Maryland. While in Germantown the family got involved in a religious dispute and perhaps that is what caused the migration to Maryland.

Below you will find a family group sheet of the first known family of Van Bibbers in America.

JACOB ISAACS VAN BEBBER was born 1640 in Duchy of Cleves, and died
September 1705 in Cecil Co, MD. He married Christina Unknown, b. ca. 1640, d. 4 Sept. 1711, Cecil Co., MD
Jacob Isaacs left his tracks in early Germantown records:
1683 - as a first purchaser, recives 1000 acres on June 11.
1684 - arrives in Germantown.
Receives another 161 acres in the Germantown land distribution on May 2.
1689 - receives more land in the distribution
appointed one of the first committeemen by Penn
1691 - named a burgess
naturalized, along with 63 others
1692 - Sept. 29 "Jacob Isaacs and Cornelius Sojerts delivered unto each
other a Deed of Exchange of land viz 50 acres in the Germantownship."
1693 - signed testimony for George Keith
1694 - cited for insufficient fences on Sept. 13
1695 - excused from appearing in court because he was in Philadelphia
1698 - received land "on a good street in the city of Philadelphia and one
third of an acre and...on the city ground 10 acres."
Jacob Isaac and Christina Van Bibber are buried in the floor of St. Stephen's Church in Earlsville, Maryland.
CHILDREN:
Deborah Van Bibber, b. ca. 1660, d. ???
m. (1) Herman op den Graff
m. (2) Dirk Keyser, aft 1704
Henry Van Bibber, b. ??? d. Aft 1729, Cecil Co., MD
m. Catherine Bougard
Lisbet Isaacs Van Bibber
m. Herman op den Graff
Margaryte Van Bibber
m. J. Bool
Matthias Jacobs Van Bibber
m. Hermana Peterson
m. 7 Nov. 1705, Cecil Co., MD
Isaac Jacob Van Bibber, b. ca. 1661, d. 1722/23
m. Fronica/Veronica "Frances" Schumacher, daughter of Peter and Sarah Hendricks) Schumacher.
m. 28 May 1690, Maryland
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
HERMAN ISAACS OP DEN GRAEFF:
Born: _1642 in: Krefeld, Lower Rhineland, Germany
Im'grated 16 Nov 1683 in: Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA
Died: _1708/04 in: Kent Co., MD
Father: Isaac Op den Graeff
Mother: Greitjen Peters
Lived in Crefeld, Germany; Germantown, PA; Mispillion Hd., Kent Co.,
Left Gravesend, England, on board the Concord (--- Jeffries, mr) on 24
Jul 1683 (OS), arvd Philadelphia 6 Nov 1683 (OS) (LUTZ p. 15).In 1689, lived on the main street of Germantown [now Germantown
Ave.]
Wife 1: Elizabeth Van Bebber, Called Lisbet (See Above)
F Child 1 Margaret Opdengraeff
F Child 2 Elizabeth Op den Graeff
M Child 3 Isaac Op den Graeff
F Child 4 Sytje Op den Graeff
Wife 2: Debora Van Bebber Sister of her husband's first wife
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan THIS LIST IS IN NO SPECIFIC ORDER.

FOSTER KEITH, born 28 March 1839, died October 23, 1898, Buffalo, DALLAS COUNTY, Missouri. He married SARAH JANE RANDLEMAN on August 16, 1865, DALLAS COUNTY, Missouri.
FOSTER KEITH served in Company B, 15th. Reg't., USRC Missouri Home Guard, and Company G, 8th. Reg't, Missouri Cavalry Union Army, Civil War. His Pension Certificate was #694705. The Widow SARAH's Widow's Pension was Certificate #381188, both available from the National Archives.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROLL OF ENSIGN AMAZIAH MORGAN'S COMPANY (Ross Co.), Served from July 28, until Aug 9, 1813 - Sergt. ROBERT DARLING
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROBERT2 DARLING, (SON OF ABOVE)
b. 1825, Jackson Co. OH; d. Aug 23, 1864, Marietta, GA; Civil War hospital.
Robert Darling enlisted in the Civil War at the age of 40 years old. He was in the FIFTY-THIRD REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, CO. F. He enlisted in Richmondale, Ross Co., Oh and joined in Jackson, Jackson, Co. He fell ill at The Battle of Shiloh, and was furloughed at Pittsburgh Landing. He was given one months pay & leave, and instead was gone 3 months. He was arrested for desertion, and was retrieved and brought back and reinlisted another 3 yrs. in Alabama. He died of military contracted illness 1864 in Marietta, GA in a civil war hosp. Robert was 5'9, light hair, light complexion.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SUSAN4 VANBEVER (JOHN3 VANBIBBER, PETER2, PETER1) was b.1818 in Oh. She m. JOHN DARLING Dec 05, 1834 in Pike Co., OH.
1. JOHN1 DARLING was b. 1812 in Oh, and d. July 19, 1881 in Jefferson Twp., Ross Co. OH.

ROBERT2 DARLING (JOHN1) was b. Jan 07, 1840 in OH, and d. June 28, 1913 in Franklin Twp., Ross Co., Waverly, Sandy Cem.. He m. MARGARET MOFFAT Dec 29, 1866 in Pike Co., OH.
More About ROBERT DARLING:
Fact 1: 1890, Civil War Cen. - 3 44 144 B, 1, O. H. A.
Fact 2: 1890, Private - August 18, 1862 - June 20, 1865
Fact 3: 1990, Civil War Cen. - Disability - Rheaumatism
Fact 4: 1890, Civil War Cen. - Jefferson Twp, Richmondale
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sgt Burl E. Van Bibber
SGT US MARINE CORPS
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: 03/11/1943 - 03/01/1946
DATE OF BIRTH: 05/15/1922
DATE OF DEATH: 11/02/2000
Santa Fe
Santa Fe County
New Mexico, USA
Plot: SECTION 25 SITE 194
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Corp Chester H Van Bibber
Death: May. 23, 1944
Note: Entered the service from Virginia.
Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial
Nettuno Lazio, Italy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Sarah Elizabeth was the daughter of Aaron ROBINSON and Susan BOLIN. She was born 1826 at Virginia. She died at Athens County, Ohio.

Sarah Elizabeth married Loyal VAN BIBBER 6 Mar 1845 at Athens County, Ohio. Loyal was the son of Isaac VAN BIBBER and Maria WALLRAVEN. He was born 17 Sep 1822 at Ohio. He died 4 May 1869 at Athens County, Ohio.

They had the following children:

Robinson VAN BIBBER
He was born 1846. He died 1863 at Battle on Missionary Ridge in Tn - Union Army.
Hamilton VAN BIBBER
He was born 1847. He died at Putman Church Cemetery. Hamilton married Rhoada (Kelley) METCALF . The parents of Rhoada (Kelley) are unknown.
Albert VAN BIBBER
Albert was born 1848. Albert married Phebe EAKINS . The parents of Phebe are unknown.
Oscar VAN BIBBER
Oscar was born 1851. Oscar married Margaret WILSON . The parents of Margaret are unknown.
Mariah L. VAN BIBBER
Mariah L. was born 1853. Mariah L. married John CLINE . The parents of John are unknown.
Susan VAN BIBBER
Susan was born 29 Aug 1853. Susan married Mordacai WEST . The parents of Mordacai are unknown.
Cook VAN BIBBER
Cook was born 1855. He died 12 Jun 1922 Killed by train. Cook married Mararet Jane ALLEN ABT. 1886. Mararet Jane is the daughter of Josiah ALLEN and Louisa BLACKBURN.

VAN BIBBER CIVIL WAR MILITARY NOTES:
Robinson VanBibber
1846-1863 - Son of Sarah Elizabeth Robinson and Loyal VanBibber
Member of "A" Co. OH 92nd Infantry
Enlisted on 8/2/1862 as private. On 9/17/62 was mustered in. Died on Nov. 25,1863 in a battle on Missionary Ridge in Tn. for Union Army
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jesse VanBibber
b. 1848-Son of Jonathan Van Bibber (Brother of Loyal) and Mary Ann Robinson
Member of Company "K", Ohio 62th Infantry
Enlisted on 4/2/63 as a Musician. On 4/2/63 he mustered into "G" Co. OH 116th Infantry He was Transferred on 6/12/65 On 6/12/65 he transferred into "K" Co. OH 62nd Infantry He was Transferred on 9/1/65 On 9/1/65 he transferred into "K" Co. OH 67th Infantry .
~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROBINSON NOTES:

Cook Robinson
1838-1863 -Son of Aaron Robinson and Susan Bolin Member of Company C, 30th Regiment, Ohio Volunteers, infantry
Enlisted on 7/25/1861 and died( in Ambulance) near Chatanooga, Tenn. on Dec. 19, 1863, from exhaustion as a volunteer on a forced march.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William D. Robinson
1835-1862 - Son of Jesse Robinson and Sarah Bolin - served with William Dixon Member of "H" Company Ohio 73rd Infantry
Enlisted on 11/12/61 as Private. On 12/30/61 he mustered into "H" Co. Ohio 73rd Infantry and was killed on 8/30/62 at 2nd Bull Run, Virginia.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Social Security Death Index Extractions

A VANBIBBER-1 22 Jul 1889 Jul 1963

A VANBIBBER-2 22 Jul 1889 Jul 1963

Aileen VANBIBBER-3 29 Apr 1913 8 Feb 1992

Albert VANBIBBER-4 17 Feb 1895 Dec 1971

Albert VANBIBBER-5 28 Oct 1913 Feb 1977

Albert VANBIBBER-6 21 May 1910 Jul 1966

Alfred VANBIBBER-7 2 Aug 1911 Aug 1976

Andrew VANBIBBER-8 20 Jan 1918 Sep 1980

Ara VAN BIBBER-9 17 Jan 1908 25 Apr 1992

Archie VANBIBBER-10 5 Aug 1908 Oct 1972

Armina VAN BIBBER-11 23 Apr 1908 22 Oct 1992

Arthur VANBIBBER-12 17 Apr 1886 Jan 1965

Arthur VANBIBBER-13 10 Nov 1887 Mar 1966

Arthur VANBIBBER-14 15 Dec 1900 Aug 1966

Avis VANBIBBER-15 1 Aug 1897 May 1984

B VANBIBBER-16 6 Jan 1925 Jan 1989

Barbara VANBIBBER-17 29 Aug 1937 Feb 1968

Benjamin VANBIBBER-18 26 Jan 1920 Jun 1972

Bert VANBIBBER-19 31 Jan 1887 Apr 1970

Bert VANBIBBER-20 28 May 1900 Aug 1964

Bessie VANBIBBER-21 7 Jul 1894 May 1982

Bessie VANBIBBER-22 27 Oct 1895 Sep 1978

Bessie VANBIBBER-23 6 Sep 1910 Nov 1979

Bremen VANBIBBER-24 See Notes Apr 1962

Caddie VANBIBBER-25 7 Dec 1868 Jan 1967

Carle VANBIBBER-26 24 Oct 1905 May 1981

Carrie VANBIBBER-27 26 Jan 1893 Oct 1966

Cassie VANBIBBER-28 20 Jan 1897 4 Mar 1989

Catherine VANBIBBER-29 23 Feb 1912 Aug 1972

Charles VANBIBBER-30 18 Jul 1907 Feb 1975

Charles VANBIBBER-31 11 Oct 1907 27 Oct 1988

Charles VAN BIBBER-32 22 Jan 1910 Nov 1964

Charles VAN BIBBER-33 15 Sep 1919 Jun 1980

Charles VANBIBBER-34 27 Nov 1924 16 Jul 1994

Chester VANBIBBER-35 25 Feb 1902 Oct 1969

Clarence VAN BIBBER-36 18 Jan 1928 Jan 1979

Claude VANBIBBER-37 9 Sep 1894 Jun 1973

Claude VANBIBBER-38 17 May 1905 May 1965

D VAN BIBBER-39 23 Nov 1956 May 1992

David VANBIBBER-40 8 Jan 1912 Feb 1978

Dee VANBIBBER-41 5 Oct 1905 Feb 1977

Delbert VANBIBBER-42 1 Jan 1911 Apr 1982

Dexter VAN BIBBER-43 31 Jan 1917 Dec 1967

Dion VANBIBBER-44 6 Oct 1885 May 1985

Donald VAN BIBBER-45 8 Jan 1909 Jan 1978

Donald VANBIBBER-46 30 Jul 1929 Jul 1987

Dorothea VANBIBBER-47 28 Mar 1896 Nov 1970

Dorothy VANBIBBER-48 16 Jul 1924 Dec 1983

Dorsey VAN BIBBER-49 8 Nov 1904 2 Jan 1990

E VANBIBBER-50 20 Mar 1935 Apr 1990

Earl VANBIBBER-51 29 Mar 1900 Feb 1985

Earl VANBIBBER-52 11 Mar 1911 Jun 1970

Earl VANBIBBER-53 3 Nov 1921 May 1990

Edna VAN BIBBER-54 14 Apr 1894 Nov 1980

Edna VANBIBBER-55 31 May 1902 Apr 1980

Edward VANBIBBER-56 28 Jun 1880 Mar 1966

Edward VANBIBBER-57 6 Jan 1909 Aug 1982

Edwin VAN BIBBER-58 3 Nov 1904 Jan 1967

Ernest VANBIBBER-59 6 Jun 1907 Dec 1984

Esther VANBIBBER-60 11 Apr 1912 Jul 1977

Ethel VANBIBBER-61 12 Jun 1900 23 Aug 1992

Ezekiel VANBIBBER-62 7 Jun 1910 Jun 1974

Faris VANBIBBER-63 29 Dec 1891 Jan 1967

Fay VANBIBBER-64 7 Dec 1907 Apr 1977

Florence VANBIBBER-65 4 Nov 1890 Nov 1967

Florence VANBIBBER-66 14 Dec 1908 Aug 1982

Floyd VANBIBBER-67 27 May 1925 Dec 1985

Frances VAN BIBBER-68 19 Jul 1906 Jan 1988

Frank VANBIBBER-69 11 Dec 1922 Mar 1986

Fred VANBIBBER-70 30 Mar 1892 Feb 1963

Fred VANBIBBER-71 31 Oct 1905 19 Feb 1991

Fred VANBIBBER-72 13 Jun 1911 Jul 1965

Gary VANBIBBER-73 11 Jul 1942 Jul 1986

George VANBIBBER-74 12 Mar 1906 Mar 1979

George VAN BIBBER-75 1 Jul 1920 6 Jun 1990

Gerald VAN BIBBER-76 2 Apr 1948 Oct 1984

Gertrude VANBIBBER-77 29 Aug 1902 Apr 1972

Gerttie VANBIBBER-78 8 Sep 1891 26 Sep 1989

Glenna VANBIBBER-79 25 Jun 1890 Jan 1973

Gould VANBIBBER-80 24 Dec 1921 14 Mar 1995

Grace VANBIBBER-81 12 Jan 1888 Aug 1976

Grace VANBIBBER-82 27 Oct 1913 Aug 1987

Harold VANBIBBER-83 1 Mar 1913 29 Jun 1995

Harold VANBIBBER-84 26 Apr 1916 Nov 1991

Hazel VANBIBBER-87 10 Nov 1902 Sep 1972

Hazel VAN BIBBER-88 12 Nov 1911 Sep 1985

Helen VANBIBBER-89 13 Dec 1904 Nov 1983

Helen VANBIBBER-90 5 May 1906 Jul 1991

Helen VAN BIBBER-91 29 Aug 1914 29 Jul 1991

Helen VANBIBBER-92 5 May 1917 Feb 1974

Henrietta VAN BIBBER-93 16 Jul 1920 3 Feb 1991

Herbert VANBIBBER-94 28 May 1911 Feb 1968

Homer VANBIBBER-95 5 Apr 1916 8 Oct 1995

Howard VANBIBBER-96 14 Mar 1892 Dec 1964

Howard VANBIBBER-97 6 Nov 1893 Feb 1969

Howard VANBIBBER-98 4 Oct 1921 15 Nov 1992

Hugh VAN BIBBER-99 2 Mar 1907 Mar 1962

Hughena VANBIBBER-100 6 Jul 1906 Jul 1982

J VANBIBBER-101 11 Jan 1935 Dec 1994

James VANBIBBER-102 1 Jun 1872 May 1963

James VANBIBBER-103 6 Aug 1896 Jan 1964

James VANBIBBER-104 4 Aug 1906 Nov 1961

James VANBIBBER-105 2 Jun 1908 Sep 1957

James VANBIBBER-106 16 Feb 1918 May 1965

James VANBIBBER-107 19 Sep 1929 Aug 1979

James VANBIBBER-108 13 Jan 1943 Jul 1985

Jesse VANBIBBER-109 31 Jan 1891 Nov 1986

Jesse VANBIBBER-110 26 Apr 1905 Mar 1978

Jewell VANBIBBER-111 11 Dec 1907 Mar 1981

John VANBIBBER-112 12 Oct 1899 Nov 1987

John VAN BIBBER-113 27 Feb 1900 Nov 1961

John VAN BIBBER-114 9 Oct 1910 May 1977

John VANBIBBER-115 19 Mar 1931 Jun 1982

Josephine VANBIBBER-116 20 Mar 1910 4 Jul 1994

Judy VANBIBBER-117 14 Sep 1936 14 Sep 1995

Judy VANBIBBER-118 19 Jan 1946 6 Dec 1994

Julia VANBIBBER-119 11 Jul 1886 May 1972

Julia VANBIBBER-120 13 Jun 1899 Aug 1974

Karl VAN BIBBER-121 13 Jul 1898 Nov 1956

Kenneth VANBIBBER-122 25 Aug 1904 Aug 1982

Kenneth VAN BIBBER-123 23 Dec 1916 Nov 1979

Lando VANBIBBER-124 3 Nov 1947 29 Nov 1992

Laura VAN BIBBER-125 17 Nov 1903 Jan 1979

Leland VANBIBBER-126 28 Mar 1897 Dec 1970

Lena VANBIBBER-127 3 Apr 1909 Nov 1986

Leona VANBIBBER-128 20 Jun 1901 Feb 1973

Leona VANBIBBER-129 12 Sep 1913 12 Jan 1993

Lester VANBIBBER-130 4 Apr 1923 Oct 1957

Letha VANBIBBER-131 10 Jun 1919 Mar 1986

Lewis VANBIBBER-132 30 Jun 1901 Jul 1979

Lillian VANBIBBER-133 29 Aug 1928 Mar 1977

Lola VAN BIBBER-134 13 Sep 1935 Nov 1974

Lora VANBIBBER-135 25 Jun 1892 Jan 1965

Lorena VANBIBBER-136 2 Dec 1900 Feb 1975

Louis VANBIBBER-137 6 Jul 1924 30 Nov 1992

Louise VANBIBBER-138 10 Nov 1897 21 Mar 1991

Luther VAN BIBBER-139 30 Sep 1915 22 Nov 1994

Mabel VANBIBBER-140 2 Aug 1888 Oct 1977

Mabel VANBIBBER-141 14 Oct 1897 Oct 1986

Mabel VAN BIBBER-142 12 Nov 1907 14 Jan 1992

Mabel VANBIBBER-143 12 May 1910 Feb 1983

Mae VANBIBBER-144 2 May 1924 Mar 1986

Malcolm VANBIBBER-145 5 Nov 1906 Apr 1977

Margaret VAN BIBBER-146 21 Jul 1908 Sep 1986

Marguerite VANBIBBER-147 17 Sep 1906 30 Jan 1992

Marie VANBIBBER-148 25 Jan 1900 17 Apr 1992

Marion VANBIBBER-149 15 May 1923 Oct 1978

Martha VANBIBBER-150 31 Dec 1891 Apr 1982

Martin VAN BIBBER-151 14 May 1903 Nov 1968

Mary VANBIBBER-152 25 Mar 1896 Dec 1985

Mary VANBIBBER-153 26 Jan 1902 Dec 1983

Mary VAN BIBBER-154 27 Apr 1918 18 Feb 1992

Maurice VANBIBBER-155 19 Nov 1885 Sep 1970

Max VANBIBBER-156 23 Dec 1912 Mar 1981

Mildred VANBIBBER-157 10 Jan 1911 Aug 1992

Morton VANBIBBER-158 22 Aug 1892 Jul 1973

Nellie VANBIBBER-159 19 Sep 1898 Dec 1971

Nettie VANBIBBER-160 30 Apr 1897 Sep 1980

Noah VANBIBBER-161 3 Jun 1901 Nov 1978

Noel VANBIBBER-162 24 Oct 1888 Dec 1986

Norma VANBIBBER-163 27 Oct 1907 Mar 1976

Norman VANBIBBER-164 16 Aug 1916 Jan 1986

Oma VAN BIBBER-165 18 Dec 1912 Nov 1987

Otto VANBIBBER-166 23 Apr 1904 17 Oct 1991

Paul VANBIBBER-167 20 Jul 1907 19 Mar 1994

Paul VANBIBBER-168 30 Nov 1923 Jan 1960

Pauline VAN BIBBER-169 29 Apr 1914 Dec 1983

Phillip VANBIBBER-170 10 Sep 1915 Apr 1959

Ralph VANBIBBER-171 28 Aug 1890 Jun 1977

Ralph VANBIBBER-172 25 Feb 1924 May 1986

Ray VANBIBBER-173 7 Dec 1907 May 1965

Raymond VANBIBBER-174 8 Aug 1914 30 Sep 1991

Rheba VANBIBBER-175 27 Feb 1914 Jan 1983

Richard VANBIBBER-176 23 Sep 1919 Aug 1979

Richard VANBIBBER-177 10 Dec 1942 Feb 1975

Robert VANBIBBER-178 7 Sep 1904 May 1967

Robert VANBIBBER-179 12 Jan 1911 Aug 1989

Robert VANBIBBER-180 14 Nov 1914 May 1983

Robert VANBIBBER-181 7 Mar 1918 Nov 1970

Roland VANBIBBER-182 8 May 1901 Feb 1986

Rolfe VANBIBBER-183 28 Aug 1891 Jan 1973

Rose VANBIBBER-184 4 Jun 1903 Sep 1985

Russell VANBIBBER-185 3 May 1902 Feb 1985

Russell VANBIBBER-186 31 Mar 1912 Dec 1975

Ruth VANBIBBER-187 15 Aug 1914 Feb 1974

Sarah VANBIBBER-188 29 Sep 1913 Apr 1982

Sharon VAN BIBBER-189 10 Nov 1946 19 Mar 1995

Shirley VANBIBBER-190 28 Feb 1927 Nov 1981

Tarcy VANBIBBER-191 1 Sep 1906 Mar 1974

Telitha VANBIBBER-192 14 Feb 1893 May 1974

Thayer VANBIBBER-193 1 Aug 1918 Jul 1978

Theadore VANBIBBER-194 23 Sep 1915 Jul 1971

Thelma VANBIBBER-195 19 Jun 1908 28 Dec 1987

Thelma VANBIBBER-196 20 Sep 1922 Jan 1979

Thomas VANBIBBER-197 23 Mar 1936 4 Jan 1994

Tim VANBIBBER-198 18 Oct 1908 Aug 1982

Timothy VANBIBBER-199 2 Sep 1958 8 Dec 1992

Tina VANBIBBER-200 22 Sep 1967 Jun 1979

Tony VANBIBBER-201 15 Apr 1914 12 Jan 1989

Vernon VANBIBBER-202 17 Apr 1908 Mar 1976

Vernon VANBIBBER-203 25 Apr 1919 Feb 1976

Versal VANBIBBER-204 9 Aug 1922 Sep 1984

Violet VANBIBBER-205 25 Oct 1910 22 Feb 1993

Virgil VAN BIBBER-206 3 Dec 1924 Jul 1986

Virgil VANBIBBER-207 18 Feb 1938 22 Jun 1995

Virginia VANBIBBER-208 24 Jan 1902 Jun 1982

Virginia VANBIBBER-209 24 Jan 1902 Jun 1982

Virginia VANBIBBER-210 4 Mar 1917 Apr 1993

Walter VANBIBBER-211 6 Jun 1919 Feb 1981

Ward VANBIBBER-212 3 Aug 1913 Sep 1985

Wayne VANBIBBER-213 25 Jan 1898 Aug 1966

Wilbur VANBIBBER-214 17 Nov 1902 15 Nov 1994

William VANBIBBER-215 4 Nov 1890 Jul 1963

William VANBIBBER-216 25 Jul 1908 Feb 1983

William VANBIBBER-217 25 Oct 1911 Dec 1973

William VANBIBBER-218 18 Jan 1912 Dec 1985

William VANBIBBER-219 18 Jan 1912 Dec 1985

Zora VAN BIBBER-220 21 Jul 1912 Apr 1991

Bertie VANBIBER-221 19 Jul 1906 20 Jan 1992

Bessie VANBIBER-222 8 Jan 1883 Sep 1968

Bobby VANBIBER-223 17 Jun 1928 Dec 1973

Clare VANBIBER-224 4 Sep 1914 19 Nov 1988

Claudia VANBIBER-225 29 Sep 1894 Aug 1983

Earl VANBIBER-226 23 Jan 1902 Oct 1977

Eva VANBIBER-227 10 Mar 1887 May 1983

Fred VANBIBER-228 25 Dec 1902 Jun 1965

Gertie VANBIBER-229 13 Oct 1892 Jul 1981

Harry VANBIBER-230 1 Feb 1900 Jul 1965

Hattie VANBIBER-231 6 May 1902 Dec 1982

Margaret VANBIBER-232 25 Jan 1908 Jun 1986

Oscar VANBIBER-233 18 Jul 1890 Mar 1963

Russell VANBIBER-234 4 Apr 1907 May 1977

Sarah VANBIBER-235 16 Sep 1919 2 Mar 1991

VAN BEBBER-236 23 Oct 1963 27 Feb 1993

Ada VANBEBBER-237 27 Mar 1891 Jun 1978

Ailene VANBEBBER-238 17 Jun 1912 5 Feb 1988

Alfred VANBEBBER-239 25 Mar 1884 Jan 1966

Amalie VANBEBBER-240 12 Jan 1894 May 1964

Anastasia VANBEBBER-241 28 Jun 1904 Jun 1984

Andy VANBEBBER-242 16 Apr 1896 Mar 1970

Andy VANBEBBER-243 23 Oct 1897 May 1969

Anita VANBEBBER-244 27 Oct 1945 Apr 1974

Anita VANBEBBER-245 27 Oct 1945 Apr 1974

Annie VAN BEBBER-246 15 Nov 1886 May 1982

Arlene VAN BEBBER-247 8 Apr 1953 Sep 1986

Arthur VANBEBBER-248 12 Sep 1914 Jul 1980

Arthur VAN BEBBER-249 2 Oct 1944 Mar 1990

Berl VANBEBBER-250 25 Apr 1887 Aug 1968

Bessie VANBEBBER-251 22 May 1898 Mar 1986

Blanche VANBEBBER-252 23 May 1927 Dec 1985

Bonnie VANBEBBER-253 23 Jul 1896 Mar 1972

Boston VANBEBBER-254 5 Apr 1913 Apr 1990

Buford VANBEBBER-255 1 Jan 1898 May 1982

Burley VAN BEBBER-256 28 May 1902 7 Apr 1994

Buster VANBEBBER-257 12 Dec 1908 Oct 1970

Carl VANBEBBER-258 13 Mar 1921 Apr 1972

Cecil VANBEBBER-259 17 Oct 1900 May 1979

Charles VANBEBBER-260 19 Jan 1883 Mar 1969

Charles VANBEBBER-261 26 Nov 1917 Jun 1975

Charlotte VANBEBBER-262 2 Mar 1901 12 Feb 1991

Clarence VANBEBBER-263 4 Aug 1877 Oct 1968

Claud VANBEBBER-264 4 Jan 1883 Oct 1962

Clyde VANBEBBER-265 7 Oct 1924 16 Sep 1995

Curtis VANBEBBER-266 23 Jun 1900 Oct 1970

Daisy VANBEBBER-267 25 Aug 1908 Aug 1985

Donald VAN BEBBER-268 5 Mar 1935 Sep 1985

Donnie VANBEBBER-269 16 May 1911 Oct 1980

Edward VANBEBBER-270 10 Apr 1907 Feb 1974

Ella VANBEBBER-271 6 Mar 1932 Jul 1990

Ellen VAN BEBBER-272 22 Aug 1883 Jun 1968

Elmer VANBEBBER-273 24 Dec 1911 26 Aug 1990

Elva VANBEBBER-274 3 Mar 1890 Apr 1974

Erma VANBEBBER-275 20 Mar 1903 13 Oct 1988

Ethel VANBEBBER-276 9 Jul 1894 Apr 1972

Eugene VANBEBBER-277 17 May 1914 Aug 1981

Frances VANBEBBER-278 14 Nov 1898 Aug 1983

Fred VANBEBBER-279 11 Oct 1888 Jan 1973

Fred VANBEBBER-280 6 Oct 1906 Dec 1976

George VANBEBBER-281 20 Oct 1899 May 1969

Gertrude VANBEBBER-282 12 Oct 1912 21 Aug 1991

Glenn VANBEBBER-283 5 Nov 1902 Sep 1982

Grace VANBEBBER-284 11 Sep 1877 Jul 1984

Helen VANBEBBER-285 13 Aug 1912 22 Sep 1991

Henry VAN BEBBER-286 22 Oct 1910 Feb 1995

Henry VAN BEBBER-287 29 Jan 1917 12 Oct 1995

Idamae VANBEBBER-288 26 Mar 1903 24 Apr 1990

Ivan VANBEBBER-289 22 Nov 1906 Aug 1962

Ivy VANBEBBER-290 19 Jul 1899 Nov 1989

Jack VANBEBBER-291 27 Jul 1907 Apr 1986

James VANBEBBER-292 12 Mar 1885 Mar 1965

James VANBEBBER-293 26 Feb 1901 Apr 1982

James VANBEBBER-294 21 Oct 1947 Aug 1979

Jennie VANBEBBER-295 19 Oct 1900 Oct 1988

Jim VANBEBBER-296 22 Mar 1914 9 Mar 1995

John VANBEBBER-297 9 Jan 1883 Dec 1967

John VANBEBBER-298 13 Feb 1898 11 Jul 1992

Joseph VANBEBBER-299 9 Feb 1898 Jun 1982

Joseph VANBEBBER-300 17 Mar 1930 Jun 1973

Lee VANBEBBER-301 8 May 1926 Jul 1983

Lena VANBEBBER-302 12 Jun 1893 May 1975

Lena VANBEBBER-303 12 Dec 1896 Aug 1969

Lloyd VANBEBBER-304 24 May 1894 Jun 1966

Louise VAN BEBBER-305 10 Apr 1919 1 Jan 1993

Luella VANBEBBER-306 12 Mar 1895 Apr 1973

Mamie VANBEBBER-307 20 Mar 1899 17 Jan 1991

Margaret VAN BEBBER-308 29 Nov 1910 Mar 1978

Marjorie VANBEBBER-309 11 May 1930 May 1974

Marvin VANBEBBER-310 17 Aug 1900 Jan 1977

Marvin VAN BEBBER-311 15 Mar 1920 3 May 1988

Marvin VANBEBBER-312 10 Apr 1937 Mar 1976

Mary VANBEBBER-313 20 Sep 1886 Oct 1979

Mary VANBEBBER-314 25 Nov 1892 May 1981

Mary VANBEBBER-315 27 Apr 1908 Apr 1986

Maude VANBEBBER-316 30 Sep 1890 Feb 1976

Myrle VANBEBBER-317 7 Mar 1892 Nov 1981

Myrtle VANBEBBER-318 22 Feb 1910 Sep 1983

Norman VANBEBBER-319 13 Jun 1929 11 May 1991

Otis VANBEBBER-320 17 May 1903 Sep 1977

Ottie VANBEBBER-321 29 Jan 1913 24 Jun 1989

Pearl VANBEBBER-322 2 Feb 1916 6 Oct 1992

Ralph VANBEBBER-323 28 May 1901 2 Aug 1991

Ralph VANBEBBER-324 14 May 1926 Jun 1987

Ray VANBEBBER-325 20 Nov 1897 Apr 1974

Richard VANBEBBER-326 11 Jul 1913 Dec 1981

Roy VANBEBBER-327 27 Feb 1897 Jan 1972

Ruby VANBEBBER-328 12 Sep 1913 Apr 1970

Ruth VANBEBBER-329 25 Sep 1898 Aug 1984

Sumner VANBEBBER-330 23 Feb 1879 Jan 1974

Sylvia VANBEBBER-331 11 Sep 1918 25 Jul 1990

Tobe VANBEBBER-332 13 Mar 1891 Feb 1971

Toshi VAN BEBBER-333 30 Apr 1918 19 Dec 1992

Verner VANBEBBER-334 3 Jan 1899 27 Mar 1988

Viola VANBEBBER-335 21 Oct 1911 30 Aug 1989

Violet VANBEBBER-336 13 Jul 1901 May 1987

Virgil VANBEBBER-337 15 Apr 1903 Aug 1994

Virginia VANBEBBER-338 29 Jul 1900 Apr 1984

W VANBEBBER-339 12 May 1921 24 Nov 1993

Ward VANBEBBER-340 7 Jun 1913 Jul 1975

Wayne VANBEBBER-341 2 Nov 1915 20 Jun 1989

William VANBEBBER-342 21 Jul 1882 May 1969

William VANBEBBER-343 24 Sep 1887 Aug 1975

William VANBEBBER-344 21 Aug 1893 Sep 1962

William VANBEBBER-345 3 Nov 1903 Jun 1984

William VANBEBBER-346 19 Sep 1907 Dec 1969

William VANBEBBER-347 16 Feb 1918 Mar 1980

William VANBEBBER-348 7 Nov 1921 Jul 1973

Willie VANBEBBER-349 20 Jun 1892 Feb 1967

Willie VANBEBBER-350 14 Mar 1910 Mar 1982

Willie VANBEBBER-351 10 May 1916 Feb 1993

Wilma VANBEBBER-352 25 Jun 1919 Jun 1995

Winfred VANBEBBER-353 31 May 1908 Feb 1983

Boyd VANBEBER-354 31 Jul 1909 Dec 1974

Carolyn VAN BEBER-355 8 Jul 1911 15 Jun 1993

Celia VAN BEBER-356 14 Jun 1890 Sep 1983

Charles VANBEBER-357 10 Apr 1903 27 Nov 1989

Clarence VAN BEBER-358 12 Feb 1933 Dec 1980

Clifford VAN BEBER-359 7 Aug 1939 Jan 1969

Daniel VANBEBER-360 9 Oct 1954 Mar 1977

Donna VANBEBER-361 27 Sep 1945 Dec 1974

Dora VANBEBER-362 3 Jun 1908 Oct 1994

Dorethy VANBEBER-363 26 Feb 1927 Nov 1979

E VANBEBER-364 30 Dec 1925 Jan 1975

Edgar VANBEBER-365 30 Apr 1899 Feb 1967

Edith VAN BEBER-366 24 May 1912 25 Feb 1990

Ethel VANBEBER-367 20 Oct 1900 15 Feb 1988

Ethel VANBEBER-368 19 Apr 1907 Sep 1985

Fannie VANBEBER-369 13 Mar 1908 May 1990

Francis VANBEBER-370 10 Mar 1913 Apr 1984

Frank VANBEBER-371 29 Jan 1899 Oct 1980

Frank VANBEBER-372 23 Nov 1933 6 Apr 1988

George VANBEBER-373 12 Oct 1905 Oct 1974

Golda VANBEBER-374 6 May 1911 Feb 1994

Grace VANBEBER-375 12 Jul 1919 7 Feb 1993

Hance VAN BEBER-376 30 Dec 1906 Feb 1982

Harold VAN BEBER-377 13 Aug 1918 Mar 1982

Homer VANBEBER-378 17 Dec 1922 Apr 1982

Ida VANBEBER-379 20 Feb 1894 Apr 1986

J VANBEBER-380 6 Jun 1911 Nov 1954

James VANBEBER-381 15 Dec 1917 May 1971

James VANBEBER-382 9 Jul 1921 Jan 1981

James VANBEBER-383 18 Oct 1926 Apr 1977

James VANBEBER-384 7 May 1943 Sep 1971

Jerry VANBEBER-385 14 Dec 1908 Jun 1963

Jess VANBEBER-386 22 Sep 1904 Dec 1981

K VANBEBER-387 See Notes Jan 1967

Katherine VANBEBER-388 25 Nov 1900 Aug 1992

Lena VANBEBER-389 17 Oct 1910 Jul 1978

Lois VAN BEBER-390 18 Jul 1928 Mar 1980

Luther VANBEBER-391 27 Oct 1911 Dec 1975

Margaret VANBEBER-392 17 Apr 1903 15 Mar 1995

Mary VANBEBER-393 4 Feb 1915 Jul 1980

Maurice VANBEBER-394 5 Nov 1914 Aug 1975

Obert VAN BEBER-395 11 Apr 1937 Jun 1986

Pearl VANBEBER-396 16 Jun 1901 Oct 1975

Richard VANBEBER-397 31 Mar 1970 20 Dec 1992

Robert VANBEBER-398 30 Sep 1895 Nov 1969

Ruby VANBEBER-399 11 Aug 1900 May 1980

Ruth VANBEBER-400 24 May 1902 Nov 1994

Vance VANBEBER-401 13 Jun 1909 Aug 1977

Vernon VAN BEBER-402 21 Mar 1932 Mar 1981

William VANBEBER-403 21 May 1894 Sep 1971
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan These records came from the Nicholas County, WV courthouse at Summersville, WV
~~~~~~~
David Van Bibber
born: 25 Oct 1856
where: Peters Creek
parents: Moses H. Van Bibber and Joannah
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Joseph Van Bibber
born: 12 April 1858
parents: Moses and Joannah Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy J. Van Bibber
born: 19 May 1858
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
John W. Van Bibber
born: 5 Sept 1861
parents: Mathias and Margaret Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ogden Roberts Van Bibber
parents: Moses H. and Joanna Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
Lucy Belle Van Bibber
born: 29 July 1865
parents: John Campbell and Malinda Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Theodora Van Bibber
born: 25 Sept 1866
parents: John C. and Malinda Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
Ulyseus G. Van Bibber
born: 25 May 1872
parents: John C. Van Bibber
and Malinda C. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
Eugenia Van Bibber
born: 9 Oct 1874
parents: Nathan B. Van Bibber
and Sarah H. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
William Van Bibber
born: Sept 1874
parents: John C. and Malinda C. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
Ira Van Bibber
born: 24 May 1876
parents: John C. Van Bibber
and Malinda C. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
George Washington Van Bibber
born: 20 May 1878
parents: Malinda C. Van Bibber

-----

Van Bibber Deaths

Rebecca Ann Van Bibber
died: March 1853
cause: droopsy
where: Peters Creek
age: 27 years
parents: William H. Hanna
location of birth: Greenbrier County
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Elizabeth M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
cause: consumption
age: 14 yrs.
parents: D.C. and Jane Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: D.C. Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mary M. Van Bibber
died: October 1854
age: 4 yrs.
parents: Mathew Van Bibber and Nancy
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Mathew Van Bibber, father
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Major Van Bibber
died: 25 Nov 1868
age: 3 months
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jane Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1872
age: 68 yrs.
cause: old age
parents: Hugh and Jane Williams
informant: David Van Bibber, husband
~~~~~~~~~~~
Annie R. Van Bibber
died: 7 Sept 1878
cause: diptheria
age: 8 yrs
parents: J.C. Van Bibber and M.C. Van Bibber
location of birth: Nicholas County
informant: J.C. Van Bibber, father
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Obed Van Bibber
died: 3 June 1881
cause: pneumonia
age: 1 yr.
parents: John and Malinda Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: Malinda Van Bibber, mother
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Margaret Van Bibber
died: 22 Sept 1886
age: 61 yrs.
parents: Joshua and Nancy Stephen
informant: Mathias Van Bibber, husband
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jesse Van Bibber (female)
died: 10 Nov 1886
cause: flu
age: 3 yrs.
parents: Jonathan and M. Van Bibber
place of birth: Nicholas County
informant: John C. Van Bibber, father
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
J.J. Van Bibber
died: Sept 1902
age: 11 months
where: Gad
cause: brain disease
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mathias Van Bibber
died: 6 Feb 1902
age: 77 years
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BEBBER, AUGUST W
SEEHOFFER, ROSA COOK 03/13/1890

BEBBER, HENRY J
KUHNNEN, BARBARA COOK 09/09/1891

BEBBER, HENRY R
HABBEN, LAURA COOK 03/16/1884

BIBBER, ROBERT
GREENLEAF, MARTINE L COOK 04/09/1874

VANBEBBER, CLARENCE W
CONLEE, EMILY J GREENE 03/04/1896

VANBEBBER, CLARK FREE,
CATHARINE CARROLL 12/11/1848

VANBEBBER, GEORGE OLDS,
LIZZIE MARY WHITESIDE 06/03/1880

VANBEBBER, GEORGE W JACKSON,
MARY MACOUPIN 02/18/1854

VANBEBBER, HENRY
CANNEDY, ELLA GREENE 09/18/1879

VANBEBBER, JAMES D
ROBERTS, LETTIE ANN MACOUPIN 04/20/1882

VANBEBBER, JAMES H
HICKS, MARTHA J MACOUPIN 11/05/1868

VANBEBBER, JOHN H
ROBERTS, LAURA GREENE 02/07/1900

VANBEBBER, ROBERT
ROBERTS, LAURA MACOUPIN 02/18/1882

VANBEBBER, ROBERT
EDWARDS, MARY MORGAN 08/22/1869

VANBEBBER, SUMNER P
KITCHEN, OLLIE E MORGAN 06/28/1899

VANBEBBER, WILLIAM M
SANDERS, ELIZA GREENE 03/31/1853

VANBEBER, A CLARK
PARKINSON, CRESSIE E CARROLL 06/24/1885

VANBEBER, ROBERT M
JACKSON, SARAH E MACOUPIN 12/19/1857

VANBEVER, RICHARD
WEAVER, MARY SCHUYLER 09/06/1855

VANBEVERS, ALONZO
GREEN, MARY ELLEN SCHUYLER 09/11/1884

VANBIBER, ANDY
JOINER, ELIZABETH POPE 04/29/1886

VANBIBER, JOHN G
CLAYTON, FANNY GALLATIN 07/01/1894

VANBIBER, JOHN GREEN (18)
COLLIER, MARY C. (15) POPE 03/05/1876

VANBIBER, NOAH
FORRESTER, ALPHA GALLATIN 01/05/1895

VAN BIBBER, JESSEE
YEWELL, ELIZABETH POPE 09/23/1846

VAN BEBBER, A D
STULTS, ELLA MACOUPIN 08/18/1896

VAN BEBBER, EDDIE
DOWLAND, LILLIE B MACOUPIN 09/06/1899

VAN BEBBER, JOHN M
GENNETTE, MARY COOK 12/28/1882
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber, Anna, born 2 Jan. 1723 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Catherine, born 17 Apr. 1721 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Christiana, born 18 Sept. 1711 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Christiana, buried 4 Sept. 1711 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Christina, born 15 Aug. 1698 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Elizabeth, born 18 Dec. 1708 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, George, in Court 24 Mar. 1900 - Cecil Democrat.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Haybartues, born 22 July 1729 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Hendrick, married no date - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Henry, born 13 Jan. 1730 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Henry, born Nov. 1725 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Hester, born 9 May 1693 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Isaac, married 27 Nov. 1768 - Vestry Proceedings St. Mary Ann's Parish.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Isaac, paid property tax 1807 - Cecil County Assessments, South Milford.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Jacob, 26 Oct. 1692 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Jacob, 2 Feb. 1706 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Jacob, 1 July 1731 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Jacob, buried Sept. 1705 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, James, married 17?0 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
Van Bibber, Matthias, had a Forest 16 Jan. 1886 - Cecil Democrat.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Matthias, born 30 Sept. 1729 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Matthias, married 7 Nov. 1705 - Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, Peter, born 25 May 1695 -
Register of North Sassafras, St. Stephen's Church.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Register of Marriages, Births, and Burials Vol. I - North Sassafras parish: St. Stephen Church

Jacob Van Bebber Senr. of Bohemia River was buryed on 2 Day of Sept. A. D. MDCCV
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Christiana Van Bebber Wife of Jacob Van Bebber Senr. of Bohemia River was buryed on fourth Day of Sept. A. D. MDCCXI
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Matthias Van Bebber and Haramiahie, Daughter of Adam Peterson of Newcaffle and Gorrisburg Pennsylvania was married by license on the seventh day of November A. D. MDCCVII
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
James Van Bebber Son of Henerich Van Bebber of the City of Utrecht of Holland was marryed to Anna Laroun in the year 1720
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter V Bebber Son of Jacob V Bebber and Fronika his Wife was born on 25 Day of May A> D. 1695
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Christina Daughter of Jacob V Bebber and Fronika his Wife was born on 15th Day of August A. D. 1698
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Catherine Van Bebber Daughter of James Van Bebber and Anna his wife was Born the 17 Day of April 1722
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Anna Van Bebber daughter of Ditto [James and Anna] was Born the 2nd Day of January 1723
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Henry Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] Born Nov. 1725
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Haybartus Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] was Born the 22 Day of July 1729
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jacob Van Bebber Son of Do [James and Anna] was Born the 1st Day of July 1731
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
James VanBibber and Naomi Barton White
Elizabeth Naomi VanBibber and William King Boal
William Stanhope Boal

STANHOPE BOAL, ONE OF THE CITY'S FIRST CITIZENS, IS DEAD

Personal Loss Felt By Scores in Piqua
Manufacturer, Patron of the Arts and Gentleman of the Old School Mourned Throughout this Community --- Passing Occurs Sunday Morning

Piqua lost one of its First Citizens in the death of Stanhope Boal, a leading manufacturer, patron of the arts and gentleman of the old school, who died early Sunday morning at his residence, 306 West, High Street, and whose death has brought a feeling of personal loss not only to the members of his devoted family but to scores of men and women who loved and respected him for his kindliness and many remarkable qualities.
Several serious illnesses during recent years impaired his heretofore splendid health and induced a heart condition from which he suffered an attack on Wednesday, December sixth. He was apparently recuperating until last Thursday evening when an embolism developed which caused his death at two o'clock Sunday morning.
Although his disposition was naturally retiring and quiet, no man in Piqua was more widely known or held in greater veneration than Mr. Boal. His broadmindedness, quick sympathy and faultless generosity drew acquaintances to him and transformed them into loyal and admiring friends. Children adored him.
He was the soul of hospitality and was never happier than when he could contribute to the pleasure of the guests who were welcomed with such unvarying warmth to his home.
Mr. Boal had traveled extensively, both in this country and abroad. He was a talented musician and possessed an unusually beautiful and cultured singing voice. He loved everything of an artistic nature and his stately courtesy was unfailing. The old fashioned phrase, "a man of many parts," is one which could be used aptly in describing a person of his outstanding culture, accomplishments and distinction.
No man was a greater lover of the outdoors and outdoor sports. Long hunting and fishing trips into the Canadian, Maine and Wisconsin wilderness were his hobby. He loved and understood horses and dogs.
William Stanhope Boal was born in Greenup, Kentucky, January 16, 1856, and would have celebrated his 78th birthday next month. He was the eldest of the nine children born to William King and Eliza Van Bibber Boal. While he was yet a boy, the family moved to Ashland, Ky., and from thence to New Port, Ky., where, as a young man, he was employed by William C. Davis and Co., manufactures of Favorite Stoves. He remained with this concern until it discontinued business when his father and associates organized the Favorite Stove and Range company and established the plant at Piqua which was erected in 1888-89. It was not until 1890, however, that Mr. William King Boal brought his family to Piqua, where they built the residence on West Park avenue, now owned and occupied by his youngest daughter, Mrs. W.W. Wood III, and her family. Later this home was sold and the family purchased the residence at 306 West High street, where they have resided ever since.
Mr. Stanhope Boal engaged in the manufacturing business with his father and after familiarizing himself with the various departments, decided to devote himself to the selling work of the concern in which he proved himself particularly efficient. For several years he traveled through Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Michigan, driving in a buggy, selling the company's products.
From May 1899 until May 1901 he was president of the three leading stove associations in the country; the National Association of Stove Manufactures, the Western Association and the Gas Range Manufacturers. While acting in this capacity he formed and organized: the New England association, an association with headquarters in New York City and a southeastern association with headquarters in Baltimore. He devoted much of his time to these organizations and by his efforts they were in better conditions under his management than at any time before or since.
His father was president of the Favorite Stove and Range company here from the time of its organization until his death on January 2, 1916, at which time Mr. Stanhope Boal was made president and continued in that capacity until January 1925, when he became Chairman of the Board of Directors, continuing in that capacity until his death. He retired from active participation in the company's activities some years ago.
He was loyal member of St. James' Episcopal church of Piqua, having served as a member of the vestry and, when a younger man, sang in the choir. He was a member of the Masonic lodge, being affiliated with the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Knights Templar. He was a charter member of the Piqua Elks, being the first Exalted Ruler when the lodge was installed here. He belonged to the Piqua Club during its entire existence and acted as its president at one time. He was a charter member of the Piqua Country Club and one of the first men in this city to play golf.
Mr. Boal was always interested in anything that he believed would benefit Piqua industrially, civically or socially.
Left to mourn him are four sisters, Miss Stella Agnes Boal of Piqua, Mrs. Eliza Boal Orr of Miami Beach, Fla., Mrs. Naomi Boal Blount and Mrs. Aileen Boal Wood of Piqua. He also leaves a niece, Mrs. Louise Orr Casparis of Miami Beach; four nephews, Morrison Boal Orr of New York and Miami Beach, Stanhope Wiedemann of Lexington, Ky., William Boal Wood and Britton Boal Wood of Piqua and a number of grandnieces and Grandnephews. His mother preceded him in death on February 17, 1913; his father, three years later; his sister, Miss Nannie Louise Boal died November 13, 1932, a brother, Frederick, in infancy, and a brother, Frank, at the age of 24.

Funeral services will be held from the late residence at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. Mayfield Dowell, rector of St. James Episcopal church. On Wednesday morning, the family will go to Newport, Ky., where the committal service will take place in the family mausoleum at Evergreen cemetery.

Piqua Daily Call, December 18, 1933 (Monday)
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Sarah McWilliams
John Crittington VanBebber and Martha Virgina Ashton
George Washington VanBebber and Dessie Mae Nicholas
James Crittington VanBebber and Alta Jean Cornelison
James Crittington VanBebber, Jr. and Beverly Woolfe
James Crittington VanBebber, III


The Navy and Marine Cops Achievement Medal (NAM) was awarded to PN2 James C. Vanbebber III. PN2 Vanbebber's second NAM was awarded for his professionalism and loyal devotion to duty. Undaunted by personnel manpower constraints, he aggressively processed multiple transfers, separations and discharges, maintaining outstanding customer service well beyond normal working hours. AMS3 Bechtol and AMH3 Frentress received their NAM for their efforts as Corrosion Control Technicians and revitalizing the command's Emergency Reclamation Program. AD3 Huang was awarded for his exemplary efforts as a plane captain, which contributed to the squadron's 223 sorties and 94 percent sortie completion rate.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Margaret Catherine Frazier
Andrew Jackson VanBebber and Nancy Elizabeth Coffey
Charles "Charlie" VanBebber and Ina Francis Roper
Truman Troy VanBebber and Elizabeth Lue Fritch
Charles Wayne VanBebber and Susan Marie Pearson

CHARLES VAN BEBBER PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL
"Charles W. Van Bebber was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel on April 1, 2001 at the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, The Pentagon. Lieutenant Colonel Van Bebber is a US Army Intelligence Officer/Foreign Area Officer and specialist in Europe and Eurasia, serving as the Country Director for Bulgaria, Romania and Macedonia at the Office of European and NATO Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense. He has served in that position since August 2000, having previously served as a Balkan specialist at the Plans and Policy Directorate (J5) of the US European Command, Stuttgart, Germany and as a Deputy Commander of the US Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile inspection facility at Votkinsk, Russia. Lieutenant Colonel Van Bebber is a 1994
graduate of the Romanian National Defense College, Bucharest, Romania, and the Joint Services school of the Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia."
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Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Jacob Van Bebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Calvin Van Bebber and Berthena Van Bebber
William Franklin Van Bebber and Eliza Ellen Ramsey
Charles Elliott Van Bebber and Nina Rennison Taylor
Dora Ellen Van Bebber and William Joseph Louwaert
Francis Frederick Louwaert and Nina Mae Gwinn
Steven Lawrence Louwaert and Heidi Gray
Jacob Matthew Louwarert

JACOB LOUWAERT COMPLETES BASIC TRAINING
Jacob Matthew Louwaert, 19, from Hayward, CA, enlisted in the US Army and reported to Company F, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army Training Center, Fort Jackson, South Carolina on 9 March 2001. Jacob received basic training and graduated in ceremonies on 10 May 2001.

The present 28th Infantry Regiment was organized in 1901 at Vancouver Barracks, Washington, and first saw combat service in the Philippine Insurrection from 1901 to 1904. The battalion's colors proudly carry 23 campaign streamers and 10 decoration streamers that honor 100 years of service to our nation.

The US Army Training Center Commanding General is Major General Raymond D. Barrett Jr. Company F Commander is Captain Coleen Carr and First Sergeant is 1SG Ricky Cooper.
Jacob's grandparents, Frank and Nina Louwaert of Fremont, CA., attended the ceremonies.
Jacob will report to Gordon, GA for 29 weeks to complete his training.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BOONE - VAN BIBBER - ESTILL CONNECTION :

Daniel Boone - b. 2 November 1734, Exeter Township, Burkes Co., PA, d. 26 September 1820, St Charles Co., MO, married 14 August, 1756, North Carolina
+Rebecca Bryan

Susanna Boone- b. 2 November, 1750, d. 19 October, 1800, St. Charles Co. MO, married - March 1775, Rowan Co., MO, William Hays

Elizabeth Hayes - b. 12 January 1776, Fayette Co. KY
First white child born in Kentucky, d. 3 August 1828, Montgomery Co., MO, married - Isaac Van Bibber- b. 20 October 1771, Greenbrier Co., VA, d. 30 September 1840

Matilda Van Bibber - b. Missouri -Said to have been the first white child born west of the Mississippi River, married - James Estill - b. 30 April 1795, Clark Co., KY d. ?

James Estill was one of ten children of Anna Claughnaugh and Benjamin Estill, originally of Kentucky and later of Boone County, Missouri. James settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, not far from the Van Bibber Tavern. After he lost his Montgomery County home, he moved to Vernon Co., MO. In 1849 he started to California with his sons William and Isaac, but he died on the way and was buried between the Big Platte and the Little Platte Rivers. The two sons went on to California but afterwards returned to Missouri. Later William Estill and his wife, Margaret Ellen Larch, and Isaac Estill again went to California and on their way stopped and built a stone fence around the grave of their father, James Estill. Matilda Van Bibber Estill returned from Vernon County, Missouri to Montgomery Co. where she died and was buried in an unmarked grave in the New Providence Cemetery in Montgomery County, Missouri.

James Wallis Estill - b. 27 May 1840, Missouri, d. 15 Nov 1890, Deer Lodge, Montana. married - 17 November 1874, Deer Lodge, Montana
Mary Cathrine Levengood - b. 13 December 1851, Falmouth, KY, d. 9 March 1912, Deer Lodge, Montana
James Wallis Estill, livery, Deer Lodge City, was born in Montgomery County, Missouri, May 27, 1840. He worked on a farm and attended school in the winter until 19 years of age, when he journeyed to California and engaged in the sheep business for six months. He afterward went to Nevada and mined at Aurora and Esmeralda until 1864, in which year he returned to California, and there spent the following winter. He came to Montana in the spring, and after prospecting for five months passed three months in mining at Deep Gulch. He began prospecting at Big Hole; came to Phillipsburg in July, 1866, and located the Salmon, Estill, Willard and San Francisco mines. Here he remained mining until 1878, when he bought the Strickland livery stable, where he is doing business at the present time, always keeping the best of stock and being ever ready to carry parties to all parts of the territory. Family History: James Wallis Estill was injured in a train wreck when taking a carload of racing horses to California. He was in a wheelchair for some time and finally died as a result of these injuries.

Children of James Wallis and Mary Cathrine Estill:
Nora Evelyn - b 4 November 1875,Levengood Ranch, Deer Lodge County, MT, d. 8 June 1921
Delia Belle - b. 5 December 1877, Phillipsburg, MT, d. 28 February 1960, Great Falls, MT
James Eli - b. 30 October 1879, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 2 September 1913, Deer Lodge, MT
Edward Washington - b. 1 April 1881, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 13 November 1952, Deer Lodge, MT
Alice Lillian - b. 27 January 1883, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 18 July 1944, Great Falls, MT
Etta Myrtle - b. 16 March 1886, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 27 November 1934, Deer Lodge, MT
Edith Gertrude - b. 27 August 1884, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 10 April 1893, Deer Lodge, MT
Granite Champion - b. 15 July 1889, Deer Lodge, MT, d. 31 March 1893, Deer Lodge, MT
NOTE: Edith Gertrude and Granite Champion both died from diphtheria.
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Delia Belle Estill - b. 5 December 1877, Phillipsburg, MT, d. 28 February 1960, Great Falls, MT married - 27 June 1894, Deer Lodge, MT
Joseph Henry Havlick - b. 6 April 1869, Lincoln, Nebraska, d. 2 April 1956, Great Falls, MT
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Gladys Ione Havlick - b. 12 July 1901, Great Falls, MT, d. 17 September 1979, Soda Springs, ID married - 14 March 1922, Great Falls, MT
Carl J. Koeneman - b. 26 November 1893, Missoula, MT, d. 18 July, 1969, Soda Springs, ID
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Doris Vivian Koeneman - b. 3 October 1925, Great Falls, MT, married - 21 June 1946, Butte, MT
Lloyd Fae Phelps - b. 8 October 1923, Montpelier, ID
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Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:

Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Merritt Grant VanBibber and Mary Axtrell
Marcus VanBibber and Mary Melissa Grishaw

Part II, Biographical Section of Tipton County, Indiana History 1914, by Marvin W. Pershing, Page 258 - 709, Index compiled and typed by Marietta F. Henry, Selby Publishing & Printing, Kokomo, Indiana 46902. Pages # 559 - 561.

Marcus VAN BIBBER, the proprietor of a three-hundred-and-forty-acre farm in Liberty township, was born in Tipton County, April 13, 1853. His parents were Merritt and Mary (AXTELL) VAN BIBBER. Merritt was born in Belmont County, Ohio, August 22, 1820, and received his limited schooling in that County. Before coming to Tipton County, Indiana, in 1850, he lived in Athens County, Ohio, for some time. He was married in Ohio and upon coming to Tipton County he at once bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of land which he operated for the next eleven years. He then moved into Jefferson Township, where he continued to farm until a few years before his death, when he retired from active work and made his home with his son, Marcus, the subject of this sketch. While still a young man in Ohio he was married to Mary AXTELL, the daughter of Lorenzo and Maria AXTELL, and to this union there were born fifteen children: Madison, who died May 22, 1867; Elizabeth, who married George WOOKEY, and has six children, Laura, Belle, George, Tivia, Jesse and Charles; Taylor, who married Catherine GOODNIGHT and has six children, Oliver, Allen, Walter, Carrie, Everett and one who died in infancy; Harriet, who married Samuel BROWN, and has four children, Cooper, Orin, Jesse and Pearl; Mary, who married Hardin KEENE, and has three children, Leslie, Nora and Edna; Marcus, the subject of this sketch; John, who died, unmarried, in January, 1896; Dayton, who married Charlotte HYATT, and has two living children, Roma and Lora; Lincoln died at the age of three years; a child who died in infancy; Emma, who married Solomon LYDY and has eight children, Charles, David, Lelia, Flora, Nora, Walter, Arthur, and Lawrence; Grant married Susan ROBINSON and has no children; Neossia Valley married Carrie HAYWORTH and has five children living, Leland, Gilbert, Mary, Stella, and Margaret; the last two children died in infancy.
Marcus VAN BIBBER was reared amid the rural scenes of Tipton County and,
along with his meager schooling, he early gained that practical knowledge of agriculture which was the foundation of his future success along that line. Through his entire life he has engaged in agricultural pursuits and by capable management, untiring industry and sound judgment he has gradually increased his land holdings until he now owns three hundred and forty acres of as good land as can be found in the county. As soon as he was married he bought forty acres and with his good wife started out to carve his fortune.
His wife, a most estimable lady, greatly aided him by her careful management of the household affairs and the able manner in which she reared her children.
Early in life Mr. VAN BIBBER was married to Mary M. GRISHAW, the daughter of John W. and Millie Jane GRISHAW, and their union was blessed with five children: Arthur, who married Carrie BECKER, the daughter of Fred and Rosa BECKER, has one son, Fred Edwin; Earl is still unmarried; Lora married Flora SPAULDING and has one son, Lowell W.; Cleo is still single. The subject's first wife died on August 20, 1900, and a few years later he married Eva (SIMPSON) ARBUCKLE, the daughter of James ARBUCKLE. There have been no children by the second marriage.
Mr. VAN BIBBER has always given his support to the principles and policies of the Republican party, but has never been a seeker for political preferment. He is a devoted and consistent member of the Society of Friends and has lived his life according to the teachings of his church. Such uniform regard as he receives from his friends and neighbors is a sure indication that he has always lived at peace with his fellow men and followed principles which have ever commanded respect and admiration. Mr. VAN BIBBER is widely known in this county, where his whole life has been passed, and he is well worth a deserving place in this volume.
NOTE; Marcus has been recorded on every census record up to 1920 in
Tipton County and is buried in Fairview cemetery, Tipton, Tipton County,
Indiana.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Alphonso Boone and Nancy Linville Boone
Chloe Donnally Boone and George Law Curry

George Law Curry, now deceased a pioneer of 1846, and journalist, poet and one of Oregon's most efficient statesman, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1820. He was of English ancestry, his grandfather, Christopher Curry being born in England and emigrating to the United States, locating in the city of Brotherly Love, where he remained until his death, being now buried in Christ Church cemetery of that city. His son, George Curry, was a Lieutenant in the war of 1812, and commanded, during the illness of the captain, the Washington Blues of Philadelphia, in the engagement with the British preceding the capture of the city of Washington.

In 1824 the subject of our sketch accompanied his parents to South America, from where they later returned, residing at the family homestead near Homesbury, Pennsylvania, until 1829, when the father of our subject died. The son then accompanied his guardian, his uncle, William Curry, to Boston, where he passed nine years of his boyhood. While there he was apprenticed to the jewelry trade, and later became a member of the Mechanic's Apprentice Library Association, of which he was for a couple of terms elected president. This association was at that time a popular literary and educational society of Boston. Many of his addresses and poems were published, and thereby he still lives on the historical pages of that institution, to the prosperity of which he so ably contributed.

In 1843 he became a resident of St. Louis, where he formed the acquaintance of Joseph M. Field, with whom he was connected in the publication of the Reveille. In 1846 he left that city for the Pacific coast, going by way of the overland emigrant route, arriving in Oregon City, Oregon, August 30 of the same year. Here he immediately assumed editorial charge of the Oregon Speculator, the first newspaper ever published on the coast, thus exercising a marked influence on the affairs of the Territory. In 1848 he commenced the publication of the Oregon Free Press, the first weekly newspaper on the coast. The press on which this paper was printed was manufactured in the Territory, and a portion of the type, the display letters, were made of wood. This gave it a unique appearance, and was really one of its great attractions. This journal was discontinued toward the close of its first year, on account of the general rush of the population to the gold fields of California in the fall of that year.

In March, 1848, he was married to Miss Chloe Donnelly Boone, a daughter of Colonel Alphonzo Boone, a great-grandson of Daniel Boone. He emigrated from Missouri to Oregon with his family in 1846, and they were among the first to brave the dangers of the southern route to Oregon, which led them through unfriendly tribes of Indians, almost impassable canons, and over steep and perilous mountains. All who came that year by this route lost all their teams, stock and other property, barely reaching the settlements alive. Some were not so fortunate, and their bones now whiten the way.

Mr. and Mrs. Curry had six children, two daughters and four sons, all, except one daughter, still living. All reside in Portland, and are worthy citizens of their native State. They are: Mary Florence, now the wife of Mr. M.C. Webster; Ratlif Boone, Norwood Litton, Willie Lane and George L. Their mother also survives, and is highly esteemed by a large community, to whom she has endeared herself by the unostentatious practice of Christian virtues.

In May, 1853, unsolicited by Mr. Curry, he was appointed by the President, and confirmed by the Senate, Secretary of the Territory of Oregon. A few days after his induction into office he became acting Governor, by reason of the resignation of General Joseph Lane, who held that office. Mr. Curry discharged the duties of both offices in a most satisfactory manner, until the arrival of Governor Davis, he again became acting Governor, continuing in the discharge of both offices until his appointment as Governor a few months later. This office he ably filled until 1859, when the State government was inaugurated. His friends then made him a candidate for United States Senator, but he withdrew his name, and assisted in the election of the successful candidates. In 1860 his friends again made him a candidate for the same position, and after protracted ballotings he came within one vote of election, but a combination of the Republicans and a portion of the Douglas Democrats ultimately culminated in their success.

His official term as Governor, from 1853 to 1859, was a most eventful period in the history of Oregon. Its institutions were formed and developed with the rapid enlargement of the settlements and the prosperity of the people. Indian troubles were very frequent. The Rogue river Indian war occurred in the fall of 1853, and in the fall of 1855 war was waged along the whole frontier, north and south. Fully 2,500 volunteers were kept in the filed for several months, besides the United States troops stationed in the country. This was by far the most formidable conflict occurring on the northwestern coast. In these campaigns Governor Curry distinguished himself by his services in effectually establishing peace, and he received the thanks of the Legislative assemblies of both Oregon and Washington Territory for his efficiency in protecting the people of both territories against the attacks of marauding Indians. In commemoration of his services in this perilous hour of their need, a county of Oregon was afterward called by his name. He was possessed of a singularly amiable disposition, and was most scrupulously honorable. He was eminently gifted with a very great versatility of superior talents, which insured the able performance of everything he undertook. During his public life no one ever insinuated a dishonest act against him.

In 1866 he received the thanks of the directors of the Northern Pacific railroad for a speech which he made before the Board of Trade of Boston, and other efforts in their behalf. In 1845, when an editor in St. Louis, he advocated a railroad to the Pacific coast, and the next year, when on the Northwestern shore, he used his pen in favor of this great enterprise.

After an active public life in the years mentioned, he retired to his farm upon the Willamette river, located a short distance from Oregon City, where he engaged in land operations. He was afterward appointed State Land Commissioner and a member of the State Board of Equalization.

Governor Curry was eminently a self-made man, as his school facilities were meager and he commenced life without inherited means. Much of his leisure time was devoted to literary pursuits, and the products of his active mind and graceful pen are among the most valuable publications of the State. His death was attributed to the effects of a cold, his illness lasting for several months, during all of which time not a word of complaint passed his lips. It was on July 28, 1878, just as the Sabbath sun was settling in all the glory peculiar to the Northwest, that the spirit of this revered man took its flight, leaving a bereaved family to mourn the loss of a husband and father, whose loving kindness will never be forgotten, and a country to cherish the memory of this truly great and good man.

An Illustrated History of The State of Oregon, By Rev. H. K. Hines, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1893. Pages # 426 – 428.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Van Daniel Boone and Mary Ann Randall
Zerelda Engleton Boone and Conrad Frederick William Unfug

Conrad Frederick William UNFUG born 5 Sep 1850 Bielefeld, Westphalia, Germany. Arrived Denver 1874. Married 4 March 1889 Pueblo, Colorado to Zerelda E. BOONE.

Conrad celebrated his 15th birthday on the high seas while enroute to St. Louis in 1865. Here he worked until the dream of finding his fortune in Colorado led him to the boom town of Denver, arriving there in 1874.

Hearing of the gold excitement in the Black Hills of South Dakota, he communicated with a brother, William and the two formed a partnership to establish a trading post to serve as an outfitting point at Cheyenne, Wyoming. The venture, however did not meet expectations and he returned to Denver the following year. When he reached Denver excitement was centered on California Gulch, which was later to become Leadville. There he went with high hopes, but after a years hard toil and disappointment he decided on making his stake elsewhere.

On 5 Feb 1879, Conrad and several others established the gold mining camp of Kokomo which was later to be in Park county. During the spring of that yearhordes of miners swept over the range from Leaddville. The following year the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad was to make Kokomo its terminal and the camp thus became one of the embryo cities of the famous Ten Mile Mining District. Fire destroyed a large part of Kokomo during the winter of 1881. It was then that Conrad decided to come to Walsenburg, although he kept in touch with his mining interests in the years that followed.
In the meantime, during the '80s, he was engaged by the D& RG Railroad to help survey the lines being extended from Garland City (now Alamosa) to the points in the San Luis valley. With the completion of the work he returned to work with his brother in the UNFUG store. Later after his marriage in 1889, he moved to Pueblo where he engaged in business until 1904. He and his family then returned to Walsenburg to remain permanently.
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Zerelda E. BOONE born 24 Apr 1852 at Westport (now Kansas City), Missouri. Arrived Colorado 1860. Died 25 Jan 1918, Walsenburg. Buried Masonic Cemetery, Walsenburg, CO.
A great granddaughter of the famed Daniel BOONE, a niece of one of Colorado's best known pioneer citizens, Col. Albert G. BOONE, and whose parents were pioneer builders of southern Colorado. Zerelda came west in 1860. Her father, Van Daniel BOONE, was urged to come west through his brother, Albert. The brothers settled on several thousand acres of land located about 20 miles east of Pueblo. Gradually a military post was developed and a small community flourished which was known as Booneville and
the name changed later to Boone.
Zerelda's parents stayed until the following year when the family returned to Westpoint, MO because of the homesickness suffered by Mrs. BOONE. But conditions brought on by the Civil War caused the family to leave in 1862 and return to Colorado territory. Colorado remained their home.
Zerelda's mother Mary Ann and her father became prominent in the business and social life of early Pueblo and the Arkansas Valley. Her uncle Albert was to become one of the states most revered persons. He became well known and respected among the Indian tribes and served as Indian Agent for Colorado at
Ft. Lyons. He was largely responsible for making the treaty with the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes for the relinquishment of their claims to Colorado and Wyoming.
Following Zerelda's marriage to Conrad UNFUG, she lived in Walsenburg several years. Later they moved to Pueblo where they lived until 1904. They then returned to Walsenburg for their permanent home. Children: Vernie B. (Mrs. H. HUTCHCRAFT) 1893-1964; and Mary H. (Mrs. Robert R. ROBERTSON) 1889-(no date).
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Soloman H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
Ezekial VanBibber and Rebecca Jane Clowers
James Albert VanBibber and Zillah Zenora Warren

Jan. 7 - I went to Idabel today and bought 3 dress patterns $1.15, 2 pair shoes $3.45 and nuts $ .10. The train fare was $1.16.
Jan. 20 - It sure is cold and I am most sick. I read the Bible all evening and prayed.
Feb. 11- I corded bats and put in a quilt today. I quilted with Mother.
Mar. 5 - Washed 228 pieces today.
Mar. 13 - The ground is white with snow - 7 inches deep.
April 30 - We went to Arkansas to pick strawberries.
May 19 - We cleaned peanuts and worked on rag rugs.
June 2 - We chopped cotten and worked in garden.
June 20 - I ironed, hoed cane and canned berries and plumbs.
June 28 - The children picked berries, I mended and canned cucumbers.
July 16 - I made jelly, canned cucumbers and starched clothes.
July 18 - I made soap in the morning and tacked a matress in evening.
July 21 - My hand is awful sore today. I read as I couldn't do anything but hold my hand.
Aug. 1 - We went to graveyard and cleaned our people's grave.
Aug. 13 - I washed clothes-cooked apple preserves and went to a church revival.
Aug. 20 - Went to a Baptizing this morning, the preacher taken dinner with us.
Sept. 30 - Picked cotton, peas and peanuts.
Oct. 30 - I put the floor in the stable and hauled corn home.
Nov. 4 - I quilted in the morning and voted in the evening.
Nov. 26 - I taken subscription for the Curtis Publishing Co.
Dec. 5 - Started a new addition to the hen house, then washed clothes.
Dec. 9 - We killed our hog.
Dec. 11 - I rendered lard and made sausage.
Dec. 18 - I went to America and Moon Oklahoma and bought Christmas things.
Dec 24 - We cooked, cleaned house, decorated and went to Christmas Tree, scrubed kitchen and had dinner. I went to see a friend whose husband died Dec. 21.
Dec. 26 - We built our cow shed.

Income for year.

Washing - $11.25
Cotton - $50.00
Picking cotton - $31.70
Work in office - $4.00
Greens sold - $.35
Eggs - $10.80

Total was $128.10 which I spent on Christmas Gifts.
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EXCERPTS FROM LETTERS WRITTEN BY ZILLA ZENORA VAN BIBBER TO HER CHILDREN:
9-20-1925 Bokoma, Ok. Dear children picking and hoeing are the children's and my side line. The present price of cotten is about 135 on bale seed, and it looks like we will get about 9 bales. I have not been in the fields in a week. I had rather pick cotten then to do a big washing.
9-15-1927 Bokoma, Ok. Dearest children, well sweet girl, I am so sorry we can't be closer together but I have not lost hope that we will live closer together someday. I have throat trouble and the doctor says it will take about a year to cure it. When I went to the oven some mornings I could not cook for an hour account of hard breathing. I can hardly stand to be so far away from you. I am missing so many happy hours, but we all have a mission here on earth and if this is mine, I pray God will help me do it well.
2-6-1930 Sweetwater, Tx. Dear daughter, well you are about to have another birthday and I am too poor to send you a present, but I think of you and pray for you. I have pieced 3 string quilts and am piecing another and I think I will have have enough strings for 3 more.
4-8-1930 Sweetwater, Tx. Dear children, I feel well most of the time, but oh so weak I can't step down or up the steps. I fell once but it didn't hurt me much. I still hope to be strong and able to work again. Since I haven't been able to work, I let my imagination build us all a little love nest up in Ark, where we used to live when we had plenty of everything, good schools and churches, we did not know how happy we were then but poppa lost his horses so we had to sell everything and come back to Texas and we had a hard time. Today is our anniversary we have been married 34 years and we were happy young people then. But today we are sad. There is only 9 people still living out of the 50 or 75 that were at our wedding. I am sending you a box of butter beans to plant. I don't want to loose one seed of them. Maybe I will get to plant a garden next year if is God's will for me to live.
4-16-1931 Crockett, Tx. Dear children, I washed clothes this morning, got dinner, cleaned up, churned butter, cleaned up the milk things, then I washed my feet and doctored my corns, they hurt so bad. It will soon be night and I will have to sprinkle the clothes and get supper and milk. I have made only $5.25 since last Oct. cleaning houses and sewing. It seems hard that I have to work after I am old and worked down. And people don't consider the work a woman does at home to worth anything. I wish I could send you some money to help out but I can't. I sell 1 qt of sweet milk a day for 10 cents but use it for stamps and I give 5 cents to Sunday school once in a while. Honey when others do you wrong only think of them with a prayer so you won't sin
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1-21-1936 Norman, Ok. Last rites for Mrs. Zilla Zenora Van Bibber of Norman, Ok., were conducted at Trinty Baptist Church by Rev. Anson Justice. She was born into this world Jan .18, 1876 and left it on another cold Jan. day in 1936, 60 years later. She died after a brief illness with heart disease and was buried in I.O.O.F. cemetery.
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James Albert9 VanBibber (Ezekial8, Soloman H.7, Jacob6, Peter5, Peter4, Isaac Jacobs3, Jacob Isaacs2, Isaac1) was born April 11, 1873 in MO, and died November 19, 1949 in OK. He married Zilla Zenora Warren, daughter of Joseph Warren and Sarah Hocott. She was born January 18, 1876 in KY, and died January 21, 1936.
Children of James VanBibber and Zilla Warren are:

Grethel Cirfroney 10 VanBibber, born February 07, 1898 in English, TX; died April 12, 1967 in Norman, OK. She married Forrest Herron January 12, 1918 in Idabell, McCurtain Co., OK; born January 14, 1894 in TX; died February 1980.

Earl L. VanBibber, born March 29, 1900 in English, TX; died January 12, 1985 in Norman, OK. He married (1) Billie May March 07, 1927 in TX. He married (2) Lucille McBee.

Etta Amelia VanBibber, born February 24, 1902 in English, TX; died August 09, 1990 in Norman, OK. She married Edgar H. Herron March 06, 1920 in Idabell, McCurtain Co., OK; died August 29, 1986 in Norman, OK.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Subject: Letter of 1688

Source: "The Pennsylvania German in the Revolutionary War", 1775-1783 by Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards. Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1978. Repository: The Dalles Public Library, 722 Court St., The Dalles, OR 97058

Begin last line page 4:
The first voice, raised on this continent, for individual [p.5] freedom, irrespective of color, was that of the German settlers in Germantown, in the following protest against slavery, sent to the Quakers, which is given "verbatim et literatim." The handwriting of the original appears to be that of Pastorius.

"This is to ye Monthly Meeting held at Rigert Worrells. These are the reasons why we are against the traffick of mens-body as followeth: Is there any that would be done or handled at this manner? viz. to be sold or made slave for all the time of his life? How fearful & fainthearted are many on sea when they see a strange vassel being afraid it should be a Turck, and they should be tacken and sold for Slaves in Turckey. Now what is this better done as Turcks doe? Yea rather is it worse for them wch say they are Christians for we hear, that ye most part of such Negers are brought heither against their will & consent, and that many of them are stollen. Now tho' they are black, we cannot conceive there is liberty to have them slaves, as it is to have other white ones. There is a saying, that we shall doe to all men[p.6] licke as we will be done our selves : macking no difference of what generation, descent, or Colour they are. And those who steal or robb men, and those who buy or purchase them, are they not all alicke? Here is liberty of Conscience, wch is right & reasonable, here ought to be lickewise liberty of ye body, except of evildoers, wch is an other case. But to bring men hither, or to robb and sell them against their will, we stand against. In Europe there are many oppressed for Conscience sacke; and here there are those oppressed wch are of a black Colour. Ans we, who know that men must not commit adultery, some do commit adultery in others, separating wifes from their housbands, and giving them to others and some sell the children of these poor Creatures to other men. Oh, doe consider well this things, you who doe it, if you would be done at this manner? and if it is done according Christianity? You surpass Holland and German in this thing. This mackes an ill report in all those countries of Europe, where they hear off, that ye Quackers doe here handle men, Licke they handel there ye Cattle; and for that reason some have no mind or inclination to come hither. And who shall maintaine this your cause or plaid for it! Truely we can not do so except you shal inform us better hereoff, viz. that christians have liberty to practise this things. Pray! What thing in the world can be done worse towarts us then if men should roob or steal us away & sell us for slaves to strange Countries, separating housband from their wife & children. Being now this is not done at that manner we will be done at , therefore we contradict & are against this traffick of men body. And we who profess that it is not lawfull to steal, must lickewise avoid to pruchase such things as are stolen, but rather help to stop this robbing and stealing if possible [pg.7] and such men ought to be delivred out of ye hands of ye Robbers and set free as well as in Eurpoe. Then is Pensilvania to have a good report, in stead it hath now a bad one for this sacke in other Countries. Especially whereas ye Europeans are desirous to know in what manner ye Quackers doe rule in their Province & most of them doe loock upon us with an envious eye. But if this is done well, what shall we say, is don evil?

"If once these slaves (wch they say are so wicked and stubborn men) should joint themselves, fight for their freedom and handel their masters & mastrisses, as they did handel them before; will these masters & mastrisses tacke the sword at hand & warr against these poor slaves, licke we are able to believe, some will not refuse to doe? Or have these negers not as much right to fight for their freedom, as you have to keep them slaves?

"Now consider well this thing, if it is good or bad? and in case you find it to be good to handel these blacks at that manner, we desire & require you hereby lovingly that you may informe us herein, which at this time never was done, viz. that Christians have Liberty to do so, to the end we shall be satisfied in this point, & satisfied lickewise our good friends & acquaintances in our natif Country, to whose it is a terrour or fairfull thing that men should be handeld so in Pensilvania.

"This was is from our meeting at Germantown hold ye 18 of the 2 month 1688 to be delivred to the monthly meeting at Richard Warrels"

"Gerret Hendricks

"Derick Op De Graeff

"Francis Daniell Pastorius

"Abraham Op Den Graef."
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification:

Isaac VanBebber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Peter VanBebber and Sarah Grimes
Franklin VanBebber

California Wagon Train Lists by Louis J. Rasmussen, Volume 1, April 5, 1849 to October 20, 1852 (A Volume of the Ship, Rail and Wagon Train Series) San Francisco Historic Records, 1204 Nimitz Drive, Colma, California 94015-3621. (Page 125-126).

St. Joseph, Missouri (July, 1850). The St. Joseph Gazette of July 31, 1850, published six letters received from emigrants enroute to California. All letters were concerned with the deaths and suffering that was taking place on the roads to California. In each case the letter-writer was not identified, but they did furnish a number of names which had been collected from the markers on trailside graves.

The first letter.......

In a second letter printed in the St. Joseph Gazette of July 31, 1850, there appeared an additional list of graves enroute to California. This letter was written on June 16, 1850, at a point two hundred and forty miles west of Fort Kearney. The writer was unidentified and the graves were reported as follows: (no death dates)
.......Franklin Van Bebler, of Ray County, Mo. ............

(Note from this researcher: Franklin's grave sight was one of fifty two graves listed in the second letter.) Source: Gary Hawpe
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Also on this trip was William Yoakum, (son of Jesse Yoakum and Anna Berry,) his second wife Eliza Eveline Kincaid (daughter of Alfred Kincaid and Minerva Catherine Cowan), and four children: John E. Yoakum and Mary Ann Yoakum, children of William Yoakum and Sarah Stone (then deceased) and Sallie W. and Kate M. Yoakum, daughters of William Yoakum and Eliza Kincaid. This family stayed in California. Eliza Kincaid Yoakum died in 1876 in Solano County, CA and William Yoakum died in 1893 in Fresno County, CA.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Ruth Elizabeth VANBEBER, born Dec 6, 1912 in BELL County, KY; Mother:
Martha PRIDEMORE

Jake VANBEBERS, died Oct 17, 1911 in BELL County, KY.

Levi Lay VAN BEVER, born on Aug 22, 1915 in BELL County, KY; Mother: Maude
BAUER

Hester Marie VANBEVERS, born Oct 13, 1912 in BELL County, KY; Mother:
Eliza CORMONY

John W. VANBEVERS, born Jul 9, 1911 in BELL County, KY; Mother: Massie
CARROLL

Luther J. VANBEVERS, born Oct 27, 1912 in BELL County, KY; Mother: Elly
VANBEVERS

Chas. Everett VAN BIBBER, born Apr 19, 1912 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother:
Bessie BELFORD

Chester Carl VAN BIBBER, born Apr 17, 1914 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother:
Bessie BUFORD

Ernest Earl VANBIBBER, born Aug 26, 1912 in HENDERSON Co., KY; Mother:
Gertie DANIEL

Homer L. VAN BIBBER, died May 24, 1915 in GREENUP Co., KY

Martha Ann VANBIBERS, died Feb 3, 1913 in BELL Co., KY

Edith VANBEVER, born Jan 16, 1916 in BELL Co., KY; Mother: Nevada PITMAN

James Harvey VANBEVER, born Oct 4, 1918 in BELL Co, KY; Mother: Paralee
MIRACLE
Birth Certificate found in Vol. 101; Certificate # 50428 KY Vital
Statistics
Identification:
Jacob Isaac VAN BEBBER and Christina
Isaac Jacob VAN BEBBER and Fronika SCHUMACKER
Peter VAN BEBBER and Anna
Isaac VAN BIBBER, I., and Sarah DAVIS
John VAN BEBBER and Margaret CHRISMAN
Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., and Mary MARTIN
John M. VAN BEBBER and Nancy Elizabeth BEELER
David Franklin VAN BEBBER and Martha Emmaline
BLACKBURN
John Emery VAN BEBBER and Paralee MIRACLE
James Harvey VAN BEBBER

Floyd C. VANBEVERS, born July 10, 1920 in BELL Co., KY; Mother: Maggie
DURHAM

Glenn B. VANBEVERS, born Jul 29, 1919 in BELL County, KY; Mother: Bertha
BAILEY

James VANBEVERS, died Dec 12, 1920 in KNOX County, KY

Cebert H. VANBIBBER, born Mar 26, 1916 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: Nettie
J. WILLIAMS

Chas. W. VANBIBBER, born Sep 15, 1919 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: Talitha
MADDEN

Emma VANBIBBER, died Oct 10, 1916 in GREENUP Co., KY

Homer E. VAN BIBBER, born on Apr 5, 1916 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother:
Bessie BEEFORD

Polly J. VANBIBBER, died Apr 11, 1920 in GREENUP Co., KY

Cora L. VANBIFFER(?SIC?), died Apr 3, 1917 in HENDERSON Co., KY.

John VANBIFFER (??), died Nov 18, 1916 in HENDERSON Co., KY.

Bessie May VANBEBBER, died Feb 2, 1923 in GREENUP Co., KY

Mary VANBEBERS, died Feb 18, 1922 in BELL Co., KY.

W. M. VANBEBBERS, born May 11, 1924 in BELL Co., KY; Mother: Eliza CARMONY

Quinton VANBEVERS, born Jan 1, 1922 in BELL Co., KY; Mother: Maggie DURHAM

Herman B. VAN BIBBER, born Oct 31, 1925 in WARREN Co., KY; Mother: Louise
DOUGLAS

Mariana VANBIBBER, born Jul 18, 1922 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: Lorena
WARNACK

Vicy V. VAN BIBBER, born Aug 9, 1922 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: Talitha
J. MADDEN

Paul H. VANBIBER, born Nov 30, 1923 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: Avis
ENGLISH

Sarah M. VANBIBER, born Jun 11, 1921 in GREENUP Co., KY; Mother: T. MADDEN

Lee Roy VANBEBBER, born May 8, 1926 in HARLAN Co., KY; Mother: Martha
SELS(Myrtle SEALS)
Birth Certificate found in Vol 47, Cert # 23040
Identification:
Jacob Isaac VAN BEBBER and Christina
Isaac Jacob VAN BEBBER and Fronika SCHUMACKER
Peter VAN BEBBER and Anna
Isaac VAN BIBBER, I., and Sarah DAVIS
John VAN BEBBER and Margaret CHRISMAN
Isaac VAN BEBBER, Sr., and Mary MARTIN
John M. VAN BEBBER and Nancy Elizabeth BEELER
David Franklin VAN BEBBER and Martha Emmaline BLACKBURN
William Lonnie VAN BEBBER and Myrtle SEALS
Lee Roy (TROY) VAN BEBBER

Ben Morris VANBEBER, Jr;
born Dec 2, 1929 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Mary STALLINGS

Lawrence VANBEBER,
died Jan 17, 1930 in WHITLEY Co., KY

Lucille VANBEVER,
born Feb 5, 1928 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Maggie DURHAM

Wilma VANBEVER,
born Dec 13, 1930 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother Edith CHADWELL

Marlie Jane VANBEVERS,
died Sep 18, 1926 in KNOX Co., KY

Amos Milton VANBIBBER,
born Jun 27/29, 1929 in BOYD Co., KY;
Mother Mabel EADS

Anna E. VANBIBBER,
born Oct 14, 1930 in BOYD Co., KY;
Mother: Clotine BURGESS

Betty Lou VANBIBBER,
born Sep 2, 1928 in WARREN Co., KY;
Mother: Louise DOUGLAS

Edith Lorene VAN BIBBER,
born Jul 3, 1927 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Talitha J. MADDEN

James Robart VANBIBBER,
born Sep 19, 1929 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Telitha MADDEEN

Lamard VANBIBBER,
died Aug 20, 1929 in GREENUP Co., KY

Louisa H. VANBIBBER,
born Feb 3, 1926 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Talitha VANBIBBER

Martha A. VANBIBBER,
born Oct 20, 1926 in WARREN Co., KY;
Mother Louise DOUGLAS

Morton W. VANBIBBER,
born Oct 23, 1927 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother Anis ENGLISH

Ralph V. VANBIBBER,
born Feb 22, 1930 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Edna MEADOWS

Elizabeth Jane VANBEBBER,
died in UNION Co., KY on Jul 4, 1926

Deloris VANBEBBER,
born Oct 2, 1931 in BELL Co., KY, Mother: Neva PITMAN

Martha Joan VANBEBER, born Sep 10, 1931 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Mary STALLINGS

Will Edward VANBEBER,
born Dec 17, 1932 in KNOX Co., KY;
Mother Elva PHIPPS

Ann G. VANBEVER,
born Jul 2, 1935 in NICHOLAS Co., KY;
Mother Alice GLASTER

Donald E. VANBEVER,
born May 14, 1935 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Edith CHADWELL

Emily A. VANBEVER,
born Mar 23, 1933 in LAUREL Co., KY;
Mother Alice K. GLOSTER

Keith VAN BEVER,
born Jun 7, 1931 in WHITLEY Co., KY;
Mother: Alice GLOSTER

Marie C. VANBEVER,
born Jul 21, 1934 in BELL Co., KY:
Mother Alice BUBBETT

Ruby H. VANBEBER,
born May 14, 1935 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Mary BENNETT

Clyde C. VAN BIBBER,
born Jan 23, 1931 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother Carrie FIELDS

Fredrick P. VAN BIBBER,
born Oct 27, 1932 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Carrie FIELDS

Harvy Walker VANBIBBER,
died Feb 20, 1934 in GREENUP CO., KY

Harvey W. VANBIBBER,
born Jul 17, 1933 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Malitha MADEN

Josevaline VANBIBBER,
died Jun 21, 1932 in BOYD Co., KY

Mary J. VANBIBBER,
died Feb 11, 1933 in CRITTENDEN Co., KY

Robert VANBIBBER,
Infant of Cloline BURGESS,
born Jun 22, 1932 in BOYD Co., KY

Roy Aaron VANBIBER,
born Jan 28, 1932 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother: Avis ENGLISH

Ruth E. VANBIBBER,
born Sep 20, 1934 in GREENUP Co., KY,
Mother: Avis ENGLISH

Wilma J. VANBIBBER,
born Aug 13, 1934 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother Carrie B. FIELDS

James B. VANBEVER,
age 65, died Oct 3, 1943 in BELL Co., KY

H. B. VANBIBBER,
age 47, died Jan 6, 1941 in WARREN Co., KY

Annie L. VAN BIBBER,
age 79, died Mar 15, 1945 in BOYD Co., KY

Clyde VANBEVER
died Jul 11, 1946 in BELL Co., KY

John W. VANBEVER,
died Jul 5, 1946 in BELL Co., KY

Annie L. VANBIBBER,
age 33, died Feb 7, 1946 in GREENUP Co., KY

Charles W. VAN BIBBER,
age 77, died Aug 20, 1946 in GREENUP Co., KY
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally, Jr.
Jane A. Donnally and James Henry Fry
Joseph Lapenois Fry and Elizabeth Julia Follansbee

Hon. Joseph L. Fry, the present mayor of Charleston, first saw the light in Charleston, October 7, 1851. His parents were James H. and Jane A. (Donnally) Fry. His education was received in the public schools of his native city, and at the Charleston Institute, after which he took up the study of the law, but never completed the course. He early became active in politics, and his services were soon acknowledged by the democratic party, which elected him in 1875 to the office of city recorder, and for three successive terms he was kept in that office. In 1882 he established a book and stationery business which he has since conducted. In 1887 he was elected mayor of Charleston and again was honored by an election in 1889. From 1881 to 1883 he was city assessor. Mr. Fry is a member of the Kanawha lodge, No. 20, A.F. & A.M., and also of Keuka lodge, No. 26, K. of P.

He married, in 1878, Miss Eliza J., daughter of Rev. James M. Follansbee, of the Methodist Episcopal church, south. Five children have been born into this happy home: Frank, Lee, Joseph L., Jr., Cleveland S. and Willdarrah. James H. Fry, his father, was a native of Virginia, and was one of the early salt manufacturers of the Kanawha valley. He was a member of the Virginia state senate for several terms, and was sheriff of Kanawha county for about thirty years. He died in 1864. His wife, who still survives him, was a daughter of Col. Andrew Donnally, after whom the first steamboat on the Kanawha river was named. She resides in Charleston, and is a devoted member of the First Presbyterian church. Two of their sons, James H. and Andrew P., were soldiers in the Confederate army.

History of the Great Kanawha Valley, With Family History and Biographical Sketches. A statement of its Natural Resources, Industrial Growth and Commercial Advantages. First Printing 1891. Second Printing 1994. Gauley & New River Publishing Co., P.O. 101, Gauley Bridge, WV 25085. Pages #169 & 170.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Plantiff Defendant Date Divorce BK PG Granted

VanBibber, Isaac -
VanBibber, Eliza
13 Jun 1881 4 - 94
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Rachel
VanBibber, Ratliff
25 Oct 1883 6 83
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBieber, John B.
VanBieber, Ruahma
5 Dec 1910 E2 81
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Lee
VanBibber, John H.
24 Dec 1914 43 206
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBiber, Carl
VanBiber, Minnie
4 Oct 1918 L2 505
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Ruth E.
VanBibber, Charles
6 Apr 1935 68 165
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Ruth
VanBibber, Charles
24 Feb 1940 77 419
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Ida VanBibber

Funeral services today for Mrs. VanBibber Nov. 25, 1928.
Albany, Nov. 24--Mrs. Ida Van Bibber, 68 died Thursday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jesse Reeves near Downington. Death was caused by cancer.
Funeral services will be held at 10:30 o'clock this morning at the Downington M. E. Church, conducted by the Rev. M. Cunningham, pastor of the Baptist Church, Albany. Burial will be made in the Wells cemetery in Downington. Besides her daughter, Mrs. VanBibber leaves her husband John Van Bibber.
---
Irene Vanbibber Funeral Services Oct. 23, 1928
Nelsonville- Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the residence of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse VanBibber, Laurel Run, for their daughter Irene. Burial will be made at the Clarks Chapel.
---
William VanBibber Dies Thursday May 10, 1929
William VanBibber 25, Succumbs at Home In Laurel Run, Nelsonville May 10- William VanBibber, 25, died at the home of his parents on Laurel Run Thursday, following a long illness of tuberculosis. Funeral services will be held on Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at the Laurel Run Church, with burial at Clarks Chapel.
---
Anna VanBibber Rites to be Held Saturday Dec. 27, 1945
Nelsonville- Miss Anna Sams VanBibber, age 48, died Wednesday morning at Athens. She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse VanBibber of Laurel Run; six brothers, Clem, Athens, Harrold and James VanBibber of Haydenville; Jesse of Laurel Run; Ralph of Nelsonville; Charles in the US army stationed in Germany and one sister, Mrs. Velma Appleman of Logan RFD and her grandparents, Mrs. Jane Burt, Laurelville and Mrs. Cora Breyfogie of New York. The body was brought to the Stout Funeral home where friends may call and where funeral services will be held, conducted by Rev. C. B. Tuttle Saturday. Burial will be made at Clarks Chapel.
---
C. VanBibber Dies in Athens Sept. 5, 1946
Nelsonville- Clem R. VanBibber, 31, died early this morning in an Athens Hospital after a long illness. He was a resident of Laurel Run. He is survived by his father and mother Mr. and Mrs. Jesse VanBibber of Laurel Run; brothers James, Harold, Charles, all of Haydenville; Jesse Jr. at home and Ralph of the Army stationed in Alabama; a sister Mrs. Velma Appleman of Logan, and a grandmother Mrs. Elizabeth Jane Burt of Barberton.
Services will be conducted at the Church of God, Laurel Run, Saturday at 10 am with burial in the Clark's chapel cemetery.

Harold and Charles Vanbibber of Haydenville were two brothers married to two sisters one of which was Edna Wade.
---
Athens county marriage record:
Alice F. VanBibber married Clinton Walker November 29, 1907
Athens Marriage records Vol. 15 page 249
---
VanBibbers in the Nelsonville, Athens County, Greenlawn Cemetery index:
Fred VanBibber born 1892 died ----- (Near Mable VanBibber) Section 10
Mable VanBibber born 1895 died 1951 (Near Fred VanBibber) Section 10
---
Crossroads Cemetery in Albany Athens County Ohio:
Loueva M. Vanbibber 1-6-1876 to 2-25-1877 Daughter of A. and P. Vanbibber
Loyal Vanbibber 9-17-1822 to 5-4-1864
Mary D. Vanbibber 12-16-1881 to 6-10-1883 Daughter of A. and P. Vanbibber
Sarah E. Vanbibber 8-19-1825 to 3-28-1904 Wife of Loyal Vanbibber
---
Chase Cemetery in Albany, Athens County Ohio:
Isaac Vanbibber died 4-16-1851 76 y
Vanbibber, Unidentified about 1840

Child of Isaac Vanbibber 2 burials Vanbibber Cemetery
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan MATTHIAS VAN BEBBER AND HIS WIFE CONVEYED 100 ACRES OF LAND TO BE USED AS A SCHOOL AND CEMETERY FOR ALL AND EVERY INHABITANT LIVING IN THE TOWNSHIP TO HENRY SELLEN, CLAUS JANSEN, HENRY KOLB, AND HEMANNUS KUSTER AS TRUSTEES OF THE LAND.
This description is abstracted from Samuel W Pennypacker, who describes the sale of the land as one of great generosity on the part of Matthias Van Bebber. He comments that "All of the trustees were members of the Mennonite Church and their selection was due no doubt to the fact that the greater number of the settlers belonged to that sect, and that the affiliations of vanBebber were with it." He adds that at that time Mattias and his wife, and Isaac vanBibber, one of the witnesses, lived in Bohemia Manor (Cecil County, MD).

THE VAN BEBBER FAMILY WAS AFFILIATED WITH THE ANGLICAN/EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM 1705 THROUGH 1730.
Records from the Parish Registers of St Stephen's and St Mary Ann's Episcopal Churches in Cecil County, MD:
~~~~~~~~~~
1691 Isaac Van Bebber and wife Franika have child Jacob baptized, 1693 Hester, 1695 Peter, 1698 Christiana, 1701 Isaac, at St Mary Ann's Episcopal Church, Cecil Co:
~~~~~~~~~~
1705 Jacob Van Bebber, Sr, of Bohemia River, is buried at St Stephens Episcopal Church, Cecil Co, and Jacob's wife Christiana died 1711, is buried at St Stephens.
~~~~~~~~~
1705 Nov 17 Haramontee (Araminta later), daughter of Adam Peterson of Newcastle Co, DE married Matthias Van Bebber, St Stephens Episcopal Church, Cecil Co, MD.
~~~~~~~~~
1706 - 1730 Matthias and Araminta Peterson had these children baptized at St Stephen's: Jacob, Elizabeth, Christiana, Matthias, Henry. (Salt Lake City Film #0013887)
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan W. H. Vanbibber - 3 Sept 1901
Mark Marcus) Vanbibber - 16 Aug 1896
William P. - 1911
Sarah J. Wylie - 20 Feb 1915
FAMILY NOTES :
MARRIED. -- At the house of Benjamin Snipes, Esq., in The Dalles, on the 10th inst., by Rev. John T. Wolfe, Mr. William H. VanBibber and Miss Sarah J. Marsh, all of Wasco County, Oregon.Source: The Dalles Mountaineer, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, November 16, 1867.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SUICIDE OF WM. VANBIBBER
Hung Himself in the Cow Shed This Morning.

The startling, but meager, report is brought to the city by Mr. Anderson just as we go to press that Wm. Vanbibber had committed suicide by hanging himself in the cow shed adjoining his home on Chenowith Creek, three miles below the city, about 11 o’clock this morning. He was found by Tom Laurensen at 1 o’clock. Word was at once brought to the city, and Coroner Butts has just left for the Vanbibber place. The news has given the entire city a terrible shock, Mr. Vanbibber being one of our oldest and most highly respected citizens. It is thought by all that it must have been a temporary fit of insanity that caused the terrible deed, for so far as known, other than that he has been very despondent since he sold out the dairy business and had nothing to occupy his mind, (habit having had a strong hold on him) there was not the slightest cause for the act. Further particulars will be given in tomorrow’s issue, it being impossible to obtain details at so late an hour.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, September 4, 1901.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WILLIAM H. VANBIBBER
Particulars Regarding His Terrible Death and Concerning His Life.

Upon receiving the startling news of the suicide of Wm. VanBibber yesterday afternoon at a time so near our publication hour we were unable to give but the meagerest report, but upon inquiry we understand that Mr. VanBibber had given no sign in the morning of an unusual despondency. On the contrary, early in the morning he offered to assist his wife with her washing, but she declined saying she was afraid he might make his rheumatism worse by putting his hands into the water. He then said he would go down into the bean patch and told the hired man to harness Mrs. Vanbibber’s horse as she wished to go to town later. He was accustomed to coming in for his lunch about noon, and as he failed to return, Tom Laurenzen, who employed by them, started to the garden to look for him. Going through the cow shed on his way down he saw Mr. Vanbibber at the other end of the shed and being unable to discern his position from where he stood, called to him. What was the man’s horror as he came near and saw he had hung himself. Taking a medium sized rope he had thrown it twice over a scantling about a foot above his head and held the end with his left hand. His knees were slightly bent, his toes touching the ground. The young man at once ran to the house, and Will Vanbibber himself carefully lifted the body down and removed it to the house. Neighbors were then sent for and arrived in a short time, when word was brought to the city. Dr. Shackelford, the family physician; the undertaker and Coroner Butts at once went down, but the latter deemed it unnecessary to hold an inquest.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William H. Vanbibber, who was born in Missouri sixty-seven years ago last June, came to The Dalles in the early 60’s. A short time after he was employed by Mr. Marsh, who kept a dairy below the city. In ’65 he went onto the same business for himself, and from that time until a year ago he has been a familiar figure driving into our city each morning and supplying his customers with milk. On November 10, 1867 he was married to Miss Johann Marsh, Rev. John T. Wolf performing the ceremony. To them two sons were born, William, who survives him, and Marcus, who drowned in the Columbia three years ago.

About a year ago Mr. Vanbibber had a severe attack of lung fever, from which he never fully survived, and of late has suffered much with rheumatism, having about lost the use of his right hand. Sunday he said to his son, "Will, I have lost my right hand and will soon lose the use of my leg. I’d rather be dead than helpless." His suffering, together with a despondency which had come from the loss of his son and the fact that he was compelled by ill health to give up his occupation, is thought to have been the cause of the final dejection, which no doubt led to the act that caused his death. His friends have remarked of late that "Van" was not himself.

The shock which came to the community was great, for he was a friend to everybody and everybody a friend of his. Upright, good natured, honest and a splendid citizen, he will be sadly missed. To his wife, who has been a constant, faithful helpmate, the shock comes with terrible force; and, together with her son, she has the deepest sympathy of all.

Beside his wife and son, Mr. Vanbibber leaves a brother, who lives at Lyle.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, September 7, 1901
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A SURPRISE WEDDING
Two Dalles People Leave Home and Will Return One.

In times past Dalles people have been treated to what was meant by the parties to be genuine surprise in the wedding line; but in a small place the nervous young man has hardly made up his mind to submit the all important question, before the community is all agog with the news. It remained, however, for two prominent Dalles people, older in years, to succeed in thoroughly surprising their friends, who had had no intimation of such intentions on their part. And so when the news spread about the city this morning that Mrs. S. J. Van Bibber and R. F. Gibons had decided to spend the remainder of life as husband and wife, and to that end were made one last Thursday, the greatest of surprise was created.
For some time past Mrs. VanBibber has been in the habit of traveling about visiting friends and relatives here and there and her visit to her sister in Colfax therefore caused no comment. But when R. F. Gibons, whose trips from home are few and far between and generally accompanied by a brother Mason, refused to act as clerk at the election last Wednesday and left for parts unknown without even a hint as to his intention, there was the slightest surmise that something was on hand, but what no one guessed. It was unkind of them, to say the least; but realizing the good common sense they displayed in their choice for the future they will be forgiven for thus eloping and welcomed back with all the good wishes and congratulations their friends can get together. The first intimation THE CHRONICLE had was contained in a Colfax dispatch to a Spokane paper of Saturday which read thusly:
A quiet home wedding occurred at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Willis, on Mill street, yesterday at 11 o’clock, when Mrs. Sarah J. VanBibber, sister of Mrs. Willis, became the bride of R. F. Gibons, of The Dalles, Or. The wedding was performed by Rev. U. F. Hawk, pastor of the Colfax Methodist church, in the presence of the relatives only, after which a wedding dinner was served, and Mr. and Mrs. Gibons left on the afternoon train for Victoria, B. C., to spend the honeymoon. They will make their home in The Dalles, where Mr. Gibons is a prominent merchant, and where both have lived for many years.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, July 22, 1903
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SUDDEN DEATH OF R. F. GIBONS
Prominent Citizen of This City Passes Away Last Wednesday.
Rupp Franklin Gibons, one of the prominent men of the city and Wasco County, died at his home on Fourth and Liberty streets about 12 Wednesday night, death resulting from heart failure after a brief illness of about a week.
Mr. Gibons was born October 12, 1832 at Allentown, Pennsylvania, being 77 years of age. He removed from there, in his early years to Princeton, Illinois, where he was married to Miss Matilda Wixon, who died in this city June 5, 1899. From Princeton, he removed to The Dalles, becoming a farmer on Chenowith creek. Later, he went into the hardware business with J. M. Marden and A. S. McAllister of this city. After the fire of 1891, in which the store was destroyed, he became engaged in the real estate and fire insurance business with J. M. Marden in which he devoted his time until his death. The deceased was married on July 1903 to Mrs. Sarah J. Van Bibber of this city, who survives him. Mr. Gibons was mayor of the city in 1885. He also held the office of county clerk. He was Past Master of Wasco lodge Number 15, Past High Priest of The Dalles Chapter Number 6. He was a Royal Arch Mason and Grand High Priest of the State of Oregon, as well as Generalissimo of Columbia Commandery of the Knight Templars. He was a member of the Al-Kader Temple Nobles of the Mystic Shriners.
Two children of a family of five remain to mourn his death, Ralph V. Gibons of this city and George Gibons of Bull Run, Oregon. A sister, Mrs. Blanch Stevens of Gainsville, Texas, and tow brothers, Clarence and Harvey of Princeton, Illinois, survive him as well as six grandchildren.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, June 11, 1909.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Passes Away.
W. P. Vanbebber died this morning at the home of his mother, Mrs. R. F. Gibons, after a long illness. He suffered for many years with tuberculosis. The deceased was born and raised in The Dalles, having lived here all his life. The Rev. M. J. Perdue of the Methodist church will conduct the funeral services at the Crandall undertaking parlors Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, October 6, 1911.
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Van Bebber Funeral.
Services over the remains of the late William Van Bebber were held yesterday afternoon at the Crandall undertaking rooms, Rev. M. J. Perdue of the Methodist church officiating. A quartette, composed of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Sexton, Miss Bertha Willerton an A. E. Gronewald sang. The pallbearers were W. E. Gilhouse, W. A. Kirby, F. R. Angle, Simeon Bolton, F. M. Sexton and W. A. Sexton. Interment was made in the Van Bebber plot in the Odd Fellow’s cemetery.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, October 6, 1911.
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MARRIAGE IS A SUPRISE.
A wedding that came as a complete surprise to many of their friends was the marriage of Mrs. R.F. Gibons and A. L. Wylie, which occurred last night about 9 o’clock at the Gibons home in Fourth street. Rev. Nathan Evans officiating. About 25 guests were present, only relatives and a few intimate friends being invited. After the ceremony, a delicious lunch was served in the dining room, at two tables beautifully decorated with carnations and greenery. The bride wore a handsome white silk dress, elaborately draped with black lace. Mrs. Wylie is one of the best known of the younger pioneer women in this vicinity where she has lived most of her life. Mr. Wylie was a respected resident of Klickitat County for many years, but for nearly a year has made his home with his son, Thomas A. Wylie in The Dalles.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, January 7, 1915.
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PROMINENT WOMAN IS ATTACKED BY APOPLEXY WHILE AT BANQUET TABLE.
(Daily of February 18.)
Death called a sudden and tragic end to the annual banquet of the members of The Dalles Fruit Growers association and their friends at the Masonic hall at 12:45 this afternoon. Seated around the merry festive board, the men and women were suddenly shocked to see Mrs. A. L. Wylie straighten back in her chair and struggle in the grip of a fatal attack of apoplexy. She died a few minutes later in the hall.
Only a minute before she was stricken, Mrs. Wylie probably better known to hundreds of citizens as Mrs. Sarah J. Gibons, she having wed A. L. Wylie January 3, was in the best of spirits and was laughing and talking with the many friend seated around her whom shed had known for many years. Dr. O. D. Doane was seated near her and he immediately rushed to the side of the stricken woman, doing everything in his power to relieve her, but from the first it was apparent the stroke would probably prove fatal. Other physicians were called to assist, but at 1:10 o'clock Mrs. Wylie passed away without recovering consciousness. Her husband was at the home of his son; T. A. Wylie, 1022 Bluff street, eating lunch when he received the news and he was rushed to the Masonic hall in an automobile, and only arrived a few minutes before she passed away.
Mrs. Wylie was a bold and highly respected resident of The Dalles and a host of friends mourn her passing.
Owing to Mrs. Wylie's death, the meeting of the fruit growers which was to have followed the banquet, was postponed until 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, February 25.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dallas, Wasco County, Oregon, February 25, 1915.
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SUDDEN DEATH SHOCKS COMMUNITY
Mrs. Wylie, Formerly Mrs. Gibons, Was Prominent In Many Organizations.
(Daily of February 19.)
The sad news of the sudden death of one of The Dalles most prominent women, Mrs. Sarah Wylie, came as a distinct shock to the entire community yesterday. Mrs. Wylie had been identified with many of the interests of the city and surrounding country for so many years that it is difficult for her friends and acquaintances to realize that she has really passed away, and that The Dalles will se her no more.
Sarah Marsh was born in Wapallo County, Iowa, and came across the plains when a very small child with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Marsh, in 1854, and has lived here since that time. She was a women of strong character and noble nature, with kindly impulses and deep convictions of right and wrong, and her loss will be felt by the entire community. She had been a member of the local Methodist church for more than 30 years, and was one of its most devoted active workers. She was a member of the order of Eastern Star, the Old Fort Dalles Historical society, the Good Intent society of the Methodist church and Women of Woodcraft.
She is survived by her husband, A. M. Wylie, to whom she was married January 3, of this year; two brothers, Josiah at Wasco, and Frank, whose whereabouts is unknown, and one sister, Mrs. M. J. Willis of Colfax, Wash. Mrs. Michael Thorton and Mrs. E. C. Fitzgerald of The Dalles are nieces of the deceased.
Source: The Dalles Chronicle, The Dalles, Wasco County, Oregon, February 25, 1915
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MISC NOTES:
William H. VanBibber married Sarah J. Marsh, Nov. 10, 1867

UNITED STATES CENSUS OF WASCO COUNTY, OREGON 1880
Precinct: Dalles
620 Vanbibber, W. H. 45 m Tenn Tenn Tenn dairyman
Sarah J. 29 f Ia Tenn Tenn wife
Willie 11 m Ore son
Marcus 3 m Ore son
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Wasco County Probate Case Files Index 1854-1953
VanBebber, Wm. H. A-587 1901 Estate
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Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan War with Chief Cornstalk brought Col. Lewis and his motley army from Lewisburg…..through the Kanawha Valley in early October 1774, on their way to Point Pleasant and their appointment with history. They came by way of the Midland trail, now U.S. Rt. 60, the same trail said to have been chosen by prehistoric buffalo herds. The twisty, over-hill-and-dale older sections would tend to confirm that.

Some contend that the fracas Oct. 10, 1774, in which Cornstalk was trounced, was the opening battle of the Revolution. Others not. Whether or no, many of Lewis' battle-seasoned men fought on throughout the Revolution and were rewarded with grants of land after the victory for their patriotism.

One canny Dutchman, Capt. John Van Bibber, and relatives were with Lewis, whether motivated by patriotism, adventure or greed. As they went through, they were so impressed by the beauty and seemingly endless natural resources of the Kanawha Valley in forests, wildlife, inexhaustible species of oversized fish and rich bottoms lands for raising crops they asked that their grant of land be here. They were given more than 50,000 acres extending from Kanawha Falls westward towards Charleston and north towards Falling Rock up Elk River.

Their names have been all but forgotten, though they are immortalized in granite on the obelisk and other monuments at Point Pleasant Battlefield State Park.
Earlier, John Van Bibber had wandered over much of the eastern wilderness from Pennsylvania to Tennessee seeking a suitable place to settle and thoroughly enjoying his nomadic freedom. Through some misadventure, he lost his way and all his possessions including his survive-or-die flintlock rifle. That was not a very healthy situation—with Indians lurking everywhere, who were taking an increasingly-dim view of the invading hordes of whites—and with no way to slay game for a growling stomach. Just about to give up in despair, Van Bibber spotted smoke curling skyward from what could only have been a chimney. He was certain it was no Indian campfire. Charging through the underbrush, joy of joys, he found a pioneer cabin which was little more than a lean-to. Whooping and hollering—in English so he wouldn't be shot for an Indian—he greeted the inhabitant, who welcomed him only as a lonely pioneer and hospitable Southerners can do. The man introduced himself as Dan Boone, who fed and bedded Van Bibber, beginning a friendship lasting for decades.
Finally, Van Bibber felt he must take his leave, and Boone loaded him up with light trail food, probably including jerky and rockahominy, or parched corn, such as the Indians used, and forced upon him, against his protests, one of his prized flintlocks. It was a beautiful piece, with carved wood stock and fancy brass plating, plus a silver sight made by gunsmith, Michael Kimberlin, of whom research disappointingly fails to turn up any record.
It is entirely probable that it was the same weapon Van Bibber used at the Battle of Point Pleasant. It is also probable that several of Cornstalk's braves on the other end of it said, "Oh, that smarts," since the piece had a bore of about 60 caliber.
Back in West Virginia and the war over, Van Bibber built himself a cabin on his new land near Kanawha Falls. It is likely that his friendship for Van Bibber is what brought Daniel Boone to West Virginia, where he built a cabin near what is now the eastern city limits of Charleston, raised a family, and doubtless a bit of hell, as well as serving in the Virginia House of Burgesses as a representative from Kanawha County, albeit powerless and ineffective.

Boone was so angry at the inattention given the needs of Virginia's western counties, he probably sowed the first seeds of unrest and discontent, which eventually made West Virginia a separate state. In bull sessions with the Van Bibbers and other cronies in Charleston, he cursed the panty-waisted, lace-bedecked, powdered-wigged, perfumed, self styled aristocrats, who turned up their noses at the rough, smelly, deerskin-clad, uncouth, ignorant wilderness-breaker, whose name will be revered forever though theirs have been log forgotten. Boone was a practical-type aristocrat.

According to some old family records, Boone's son, Jesse, married one of John Van Bibber's younger daughters, Chloe. (Look out, here comes that same flintlock rifle again.) No it wasn't a shotgun wedding.

Years earlier, Chloe had been kidnapped by Indians and spirited off to one of their villages in Ohio. Her father, headstrong and determined as are most of his descendants, grabbed his rifle, mounted his horse
and began to search for her although he didn't have the vaguest notion which tribe had taken her or where. For 84 days he roamed and combed every Indian village in Ohio, the most likely place to look, since Cornstalk and his ilk had been driven across the Ohio River.

For some reason, known only to the Great Spirit, the Indians feared Van Bibber and let him come and go in peace as they did Boone. He kept a record of the time it took by cutting notches on a small stick attached with rawhide to his shot pouch and powder horn. Unaccountably, the twig was highly polished, possibly from his constant rubbing of it in agitation and grief as one would a worry stone today. Some over-imaginative descendents claimed the notches Redskins he had slain, but that is ridiculous, for he was no murderer and the notches are marked off in units of sevens or weeks. His persistence finally paid off. John found Chloe and brought her back home to West Virginia.

John later passed on the now-famous Van Bibber rifle to his son, Mathias, (Mathias was not a son of John, but a nephew through his brother Peter) reputed to have been one of the first sheriffs of Kanawha County, who scratched his monogram in the brass stock plate. He also did a bit of other scratching around and married Mariam Hutchinson. (This was Margaret Hutchinson, his second wife, whom he married about 1811 and they had no children). They only had two children: David, and a daughter, Felicity, (Felicity was a daughter of Margaret Robinson, first wife of Mathias) who married Moses Mann Hill, son of Spencer Hill and grandson of Francis Hill, oldest known member of that tribe in America. Doubtless you have heard of the West Virginia Hills? They are everywhere, for Moses and Felecity must not have had much to occupy their spare time—they only had 15 children, equally fertile.

Dividing the original 50,000 Van Bibber acres so may ways didn't leave a very big hunk for anybody, but their favored first born, names for another prominent Kanawha Valley landowner, George Washington, got one of the choicer pieces, George Washington Hill married Rebecca Jane Kendall, sixth great granddaughter of John Rolfe and an Indian lass named Amonate or Matoax or Rebecca—take your choice. You may also have heard about her by her tribal name of Pocahontas, which means Little Snow Feather. Indians were romantic!
So were George Washington and Rebecca Van Bibber (should be Hill). They begat nine younguns.
Major "Billy" Hill, another grandson of Spencer, inherited a vast acreage of the original Van Bibber holdings around Gauley Bridge and Belle Creek, said to be worth a million—quite a switch from the 10 cents an acre valuation when John Van Bibber got it.
It is said that on his deathbed Billy was frightened into leaving his property to some self-styled charitable organization or he would suffer the fires of damnation and hell. Relatives contested the will and litigation went on for half a century, meanwhile taxes and other fees nibbled away happily at the estate.
Eventually the estate was settled a few years ago in favor of the relatives who had proliferated algebraically with their own little private population explosion—oh, those West Virginia Hills—and the proceeds were divided—the more distant the relatives, the smaller the checks. The postage to mail them must have been frightful.
Two of George W. and Rebecca Hill's children: Antoinette, or "Pidge," and Owen Duffy (Duffy Street?), engaged in a little game of Monopoly and bought out, or otherwise contrived to get from the other children, most of their parent's property when it was whacked up.
Owen Duffy (O.D.) was an eccentric and took 3,000 acres-larger than many of West Virginia's beautiful state parks and forests—of the remotest area 15 miles up Blue Creek north of Charleston. He named it after his mother's family home, Old Kendalia, which in turn was named for her father, George Kendall, who married the fifth great granddaughter of John and Little Snow Feather.
O. D. Hill's nearest neighbor was two miles in one direction, and three in the other, mainly because he owned most of the land in between and because he was so gregarious.
"Pidge" was smarter and took her's along Elk River. She married the Rev. Christopher Bream Graham—thus the communities of Graham Station and Bream, just upriver from Charleston, and quite possibly Christopher Street in Charleston and maybe even Bream Memorial Presbyterian Church.
Mr. Bream was rather a modest and retiring man.
Their son, Will Graham, was fire chief of Charleston for many years.
The Rev. Mr. Bream was minister of a church that established a mission in Siam, now Thailand, and once had the distinction of entertaining the King of Siam here in Charleston. The King had come as a goodwill gesture of thanks for the church's work in his country. Bream got so nervous at the prospect of such an awesome guest he asked "O. D." what in the world to do. Duffy answered, "Feed him rice and rats! That's what he's used to eating back home." You see, Duffy was more worldly and widely-traveled than Mr. Bream and couldn't resist any opportunity to jest, though many took him seriously, because he never laughed or cracked up at his own jokes.

"O. D.," began his multi-hued career as a school teacher at the age of 18 in a one-roomer just about as far back in the sticks as one can get. He used a stand-up schoolmaster's desk so old that it looked like it came over on the Mayflower, was rejected and sent back to England. It was solid cherry, put together with wooden pegs and the legs had been turned on a foot-powered lathe. When it was exhibited once, knowledgeable collectors said they had never even seen a picture or mention of one like in 30 years of antiquing. In their opinion, it was a museum piece.
But one of O. D.'s prized possessions was Gen. Robert E. Lee's Colt pistol, patented in 1855 ('Marse Bob' had a grandmother by the name of Hill.) The Lee Colt bore the serial number 75302 and the same serial number was on all the various parts, which is rare. The pistol and its holster were passed down as Hill family heirlooms until they were stolen by a burglar in 1971. Anyone knowing of the present whereabouts of the stolen property, should contact the Charleston Police Department.

"O. D.," married Edna Laura Black of Gallatin, Mo. In 1898. (Remember Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury 1801 – 18?). She was a descendant of Mid Western pioneer stock including immigrant George Harden of Dublin, Ireland and Bathsheba Lightner (another good Dutch name) who was born in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, which kind of brings us full circle.

One of the Harden sons, Monroe, was killed at the Battle of Shiloh, and a granddaughter, Frances, served as secretary of the National Educational Assn., for many years. Another son married Ruth Vanderlip sister of Frank Vanderlip, who was the first correspondent to report the sinking of the Battleship Maine, opening gun of the Spanish-American War.
Some of Duffy's and Edna's children and grandchildren are still lurking around. Their firstborn, Irene, married Hugh B. Robins, MD, now deputy director of Pittsburgh's Health Dept., formerly of the Kellogg Foundation in Battle Creek, Mich., and who served as city health commissioner of Charleston for many years.
Their son, Kendall Harden Robins, DS, is a painless driller in Battle Creek and confidant of the Kelloggs and Posts, since only their dentist knows for sure. Another son, Owen Hill, is a sawbones in Houston—the name of the state eludes.
Dr. Hugh's father was Joe E. Robins, Sr. also a physician, co-founder of National City Bank (now the Terminal Building at the corner of Capitol Street and Kanawha Boulevard), which was later merged to form one of Charleston's leading backs today. Joe was also president of the Kanawha County School Board for decades—J.E. Robins Elementary School on the West Side was named in his honor. No telling what other pies of endeavors he got into.
Dr. Thigh's sister, Madge, married Kemp Littlepage and their stone mansion is now headquarters for Littlepage Terrace housing development.
"O. D's" son, O. D. II, married Maple Wysong, architect for Charleston's Municipal Auditorium, the now-gone Ventura Hotel in Ashland, Ky., and other landmarks. Their son, O. D. III is with Ma Bell in Dayton Beach, and younger son, Dick owns a dog kennel in Ft. Myers, Fla.
The baby of O. D.'s family was born in St. Francis Hospital. His father's best friend was the Rev. Francis Merrill of Dunellen, N.J. The Hill neighbors had a model son Francis. Seven signers of the Declaration of Independence were named Francis, and, remember, a Francis was the earliest known Hill in America.
The baby didn't have a chance. They named him Francis.
He also suffered the indignity, long before the advent of Playboy, of having his picture in the nude printed on page 12 of the may 29, 1922, edition of the Charleston Gazette. The caption read:
"He's just had a bath, that's sure, and hasn't had time to dress, and he's learning to stalk Indians, maybe, just like one of his forefathers did it. His name is Francis B. Hill; he lives at Kendalis, W. Va.; his parents are Mr. & Mrs. O. D. Hill—and he is a direct descendant of Daniel Boone, (not through the Van Bibbers if he is) famous Indian fighter and at one time a sheriff of Kanawha County. Maybe he's trying to learn how Danny did it, even if he is only 20 months old."
Which proves that newspapers have been making mistakes ever since May 28, 1922.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan William H. Bryant

William was born September 05, 1809. William was a farmer. His first marriage was in 1835 to Jane Groves. Jane was born May 12, 1816, the daughter of John Roger Groves III and Jane McClung. Jane died June 17, 1846. She was buried at the Southern Methodist Church Cemetery in Summersville, WV. William's second marriage was before 1849 to Ruth McClung. Ruth was born November 04, 1839, the daughter of Edward "Little Ned" McClung and Lettie Cottle. Ruth died December 16, 1881. She was buried at the Southern Methodist Church Cemetery in Summersville, WV. William died May 09, 1889 at the residence of William G. Graves, on Bryant Branch. William was buried at the Southern Methodist Church Cemetery in Summersville, WV. William died of pneumonia.

Children by Jane Groves:

1) Harrison Bryant fought for the South in the civil war. He died May 23, 1862, in battle of Lewisburg and was buried at the confederate cemetery in Lewisburg, WV. Harrison served in the 22nd VA Inf Regt, company D. He enlisted May 30, 1861 in Summersville, VA (now WV)

Mary Ann Bryant married Andrew D. Vanbibber. Mary died July 08, 1871 and was buried at the Donnally/Van Bibber Cemetery.

3) John Groves Bryant:
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan SAN FRANCISCO CEMETERY INDEX, 1848-1863.

Van Bibber,
San Fran. 1862 23(?)
Lone Mt. Cemetery, No. 2,
T. 18, children's plot
(child of T. & Eva)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Calvin M - 91 - Mendocino Co. -
14 Nov 1911

VanBebber, Esmereld F - 67 - Sonoma Co. -
28 Sep 1920

VanBebber, Frederick E. M - 45 - Sonoma Co. - 15 Oct 1922

VanBebber, Harry M - 34 - Humboldt Co. -
21 Dec 1929

VanBebber, James W. M - 35 - Sonoma Co. -
12 Dec 1918

VanBebber, Martha M. F - 80 - Los Angeles Co. -14 Feb 1929

VanBebber, Peter M - 65 - Sonoma Co. -
27 Dec 1912

VanBibber, Arthur E. M - 08 - Los Angeles Co. -04 Mar 1929

VanBibber, Correne F - 21 - Los Angeles Co. - 26 May 1929

VanBibber, Doris I. F - 04 - Los Angeles Co. - 04 Dec 1927

VanBibber, Harold M - 27 - Los Angeles Co. - 01 Feb 1928

VanBibber, Louis A. M - 54 - Los Angeles Co. - 19 Dec 1918

VanBibber, Lutishey F - 47 - Orange Co. - 06 Jul 1927

VanBibber, Phillip M - 42 - Los Angeles Co. - 06 Apr 1925

VanBibber, Robert M - 32 - Riverside Co. - 28 May 1911

VanBibbler, Mildred F - 79 - Santa Cruz, Co. - 08 Jun 1919
NOTE:(Mildred's name was spelled "VanBibbler" but I think she is one of ours.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
James Timberlake VanBibber and Evaline Raison
Charles VanBibber

Sacramento City Cemetery 1875 - 1885

Van Bibber, C. died 18 Oct 1885 age 18 yrs, 8 mths, 18 days.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Van Bibber, William Noah
(1890 - 1954)
b. 05 JUL 1890
d. 12 MAR 1954 in Los Angeles, CA
Burial - [place: Pasadena, Los Angeles Co., CA]
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Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan VanBebber, Calvin -
VanBebber, Barthena
Jan 17, 1850 Linn Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Vardaman -
Dotson, Ellen F.
Apr 02, 1845 Linn Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Mary J.-
Bennett, William
Nov 21, 1843 Linn Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Nancy -
Bailey, William
Mar 15, 1857 Linn Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Granville -
VanBebber, Margaret J.
Jan 20, 1859 ? Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vanbebber, Henderson
31 Mar 1853
Grimes, Sarah Catherine
~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, James H. -
Hooker, Ruth A.
Mar 24, 1865 Linn Co. Mo.
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Vanbebber, Martha
17 Feb 1853
Kincaid, Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Nancy K. -
Kincaid, John L.
Dec 31, 1848 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, John H.-
Baker, Matilda
Dec 01, 1853 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, George M. -
Lamb, Serepta J.
Mar 01, 1866 Ray Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Prudence E. -
Hamilton, George W.
Feb 04, 1886 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, William H. -
Grimes, Sarah C.
Mar 21, 1853 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, William H. -
Pryor, Caroline V.
Oct 02, 1884 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Nimrod C. -
Borden, Adeline
Jul 01, 1867 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Barbara -
Mayes, Thomas D.
Dec 06, 1855 Ray Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Martha J. -
Kincaid, Franklin L.
Feb 27, 1853 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, James H. -
Baker, Elizabeth J.
Feb 14, 1865 Ray Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, Pryor L. -
Kincaid, Lydia A.
Oct 10, 1867 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Pryor L. -
Hutchings, Mary M.
Sep 17, 1878 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Emily E. -
Kincaid, Richard
Dec 16, 1860 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Julia A. -
Campbell, Joseph
Feb 24, 1866 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Sarah F. -
Harmon, John
Apr 15, 1866 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, William F. -
Craven, Susan G.
Dec 21, 1881 Ray Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Celestia A. -
Kincaid, George B.
Sep 20, 1893 Ray Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, James -
Rutherford, Martha
Mar 24, 1880 ? Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBebber, James -
Hardey, Loretta
Oct 14, 1906 Caldwell Co. Mo.
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VanBebber, Christina -
Blew, Elisha N.
Jul 23, 1876 Caldwell Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Eriwn -
Bosher, Mary
May 08, 1853 Callaway Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Mary J. -
Rigg, Joseph E.
Dec 16, 1856 Pettis Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Margaret N. -
Fisher, Frances M.
May 19, 1853 Pettis Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Jeffrey J. -
Spurgen, Sarah J.
Jan 24, 1864 Pettis Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, George B. -
Turley, Elizabeth
Apr 12, 1868 Pettis Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Lucinda -
Lomax, Ashal
Oct 15, 1848 Callaway Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Melissa -
Hutts, Lorenzo D.
Jan 12, 1837 Callaway Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Noah -
Carter, Elizabeth
Oct 25, 1853 St. Charles Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Olive -
Stultz, Casper
Jan 16, 1853 Warren Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, William -
Thoroughman, Frances
Oct 23, 1851 Warren Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Margaret -
Williams, Lewis
Jun 22, 1855 Warren Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Nancy -
Gardyne, David
Feb 25, 1862 Warren Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Ezekiel -
Clowers, Rebecca J.
Oct 30, 1866 St. Charles Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, James D.-
Staley, Caroline
Feb 28, 1854 Greene Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Sarah -
Woodward, Alsa
Nov 23, 1848 Greene Co. Mo.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Letitia -
Shaver, Arthur
Apr 17, 1843 Randolph Co. Ark.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Felicity B. -
Nebergall, Presley V.
Jan 27, 1859 Nicholas Co. WV
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Nathan B. -
Mays, Sarah H.
Dec 17, 1866 Nicholas Co. WV
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, John C.R. -
Taylor, Catherine
May 18, 1865 Nicholas Co. WV
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Olive B. -
Keenan, Robert
Feb 05, 1824 Nicholas Co. WV
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Nancy B. -
Girdner, Alexander A.
Jul 22, 1877 Hunt Co. Tx
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Elizabeth -
Francis, James A.
Jul 22, 1866 Hunt Co. Tx
~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Martha E. -
Miller, Pleasant
Sep 12, 1869 Hunt Co. Tx
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, James M.R. -
Nellis, Emma J.
Oct 15, 1868 Muscatine Co. Iowa
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hanna Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
James VanBebber and Elizabeth Jane Snuffer
William Nicholas VanBebber and Martha Osborn
Roy Vest VanBebber and Anne Wenner
George Thomas VanBebber

VanBebber, George Thomas
Born October 21, 1931, in Troy, KS

Federal Judicial Service:
U. S. District Court, District of Kansas
Nominated by George Bush on September 13, 1989, to a seat vacated by Richard D. Rogers; Confirmed by the Senate on November 21, 1989, and received commission on December 8, 1989. Served as chief judge, 1995-2000. Assumed senior status on December 31, 2000.

Education:
University of Kansas, B.A., 1953

University of Kansas School of Law, LL.B., 1955

Professional Career:
Private practice, Troy, Kansas, 1955-1959
Assistant U.S. attorney, District of Kansas, 1959-1961
Private practice, Troy, Kansas, 1961-1982
County attorney, Doniphan County, Kansas, 1963-1969
Member, Kansas House of Representatives, 1973-1975
U.S. Magistrate, U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, 1982-1989
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Nancy VanBibber and Moses Haney
David Haney and Martha Ann Henry
LuElla Haney and Alfred Boyer

ALFRED BOYER is the present incumbent in the post office at Kootenai, where he has served with acceptability and faith fullness since the office was established. He is a man of intelligence and stability and has won many friends in all parts where he is acquainted.

Alfred Boyer was born in Scioto County, Ohio, on April 1, 1854, being the son of Wesley and Elizabeth (McNalley) Boyer, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. They were married in Scioto County, and there the father conducted a charcoal business until 1880, then followed farming until his death in 1899. The mother died in January 1902. They were the parents of nine children: David, deceased; Alfred, the subject of this article; Calfernia, wife of John Dressler, in Ohio; Addie B.; wife of Jeff Haney, in Portsmouth, Ohio; Ida, deceased; John, in Kootenai County; Frank, in Lawrence County, Ohio; Alex, living in Scioto County, Ohio. Our subject attended school in the winter and labored with his father until he was twenty-three year sold. Then starting for himself he engaged with a farmer for three years, after which he spent eight years in railroading. It was 1889 that he made his way into the Sandpoint region, being a pioneer here. He worked a year at tie making and shingle manufacture and in 1892 took
his present homestead. He has a good orchard and a portion of the farm under cultivation. In 1895 the post office was established and Mr. Boyer was selected as postmaster, which he has filled in a becoming
manner since.

On November 25, 1881, Mr. Boyer married Miss Ella, daughter of David and Martha Haney, natives of Ohio. The father conducted a boiler shop there until his death in 1881. The mother still lives in Ironton,
Ohio, being seventy years of age and healthy and hearty. Mr. Boyer and his estimable wife are the parents of eight children, six of whom are living, as follows: Grace V., Roberta, Charles A., George W.,
Charlotte I., and Lester. Mr. Boyer is a charter member of the Sandpoint Lodge, No.59, of the I. 0.0. F. His wife is a member of the Rebekahs. They both are devout members of the Baptist Church and are
exemplary and upright people, being held in high respect and esteem by all.

The 1903 History of Northern Idaho
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Delinda Boone and James Craig
Harriet Jane Craig and Timothy Doty
David Boone Doty
DOTY, David Boone, county sheriff of Carroll county, is a native of the county, born in Mt. Carroll township, September 19, 1856, a son of Timothy and Jane (Craig) Doty, the former a native of Canada. The father was educated in his native country and at the age of twenty-one years came to Illinois. He had been reared to farm work and had attended the common schools. About 1842 he came to Savanna and for four years worked at whatever employment he was able to find. When he married he settled on a farm in Mt. Carroll township, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1890.
After attending the district schools in his native township, David B. Doty engaged in farming and in 1883 moved to a farm near Galesburg, Neosho county, Kans., where he carried on agricultural pursuits about five years. He then retired to Savanna, Ill., and for some nine years worked for a railroad company. Mr. Doty is a Republican in politics and has always been interested in public affairs. He has always enjoyed the confidence and regard of his fellow citizens and in 1902 was elected to the office of sheriff, being re-elected in 1906 and again in 1910. He had previously served some time as station police officer at Savanna so was well fitted by experience and study for the office of sheriff, the duties of which he has performed in a satisfactory manner.
Mr. Doty was married (first) December 18, 1879, to Maggie Shannon and they had five children: Lee, who was born October 5, 1890, married Ollie Allison and lives at Portland, Ore.; Jennie, who was born October 31, 1882.; William, who was born September 9, 1885, married Zella Feter and lives in Mt. Carroll; Mabel, who was born April 4, 1888, married Clarence Poffenbarger, issue--Clarence and an infant; and Dee, who died in early childhood. Mrs. Doty died March 21, 1900, and is buried in the Savanna cemetery. Mr. Doty was married (second) on November 22, 1906, to Anna McCall, of Mt. Carroll, and they had two children: Dee McCall, born December 1, 1907; and Margaret E., born January 12, 1911. Mr. Doty is a member of the Masonic lodge and the Modern Woodmen of America.

Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois, edited by Newton Bateman, LL.D. and Paul Selby, A.M. and History of Carroll County, edited by Charles L. Hostetter, Volume II, Chicago Munsell Publishing Company, Publishers, 1913. Pages 775 & 776.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan [1914]
Last Name: VANBIBER, First Name: BERNADI, Middle Initial: ,
Date of Death: 01/04/14,
City: , County: VINTON, Volume: 1279, Certificate #: 05924, Code: 82,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
[1915]
Last Name: VANBIBBER, First Name: H, Middle Initial: L,
Date of Death: 05/24/15,
City: , County: HAMILTON, Volume: 1650, Certificate #: 28596, Code: 31,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Last Name: VANBIBBER,
First Name: HARDING, Middle Initial: ,
Date of Death: 11/11/15,
City: , County: JACKSON,
Volume: 1780, Certificate #: 61162, Code: 40,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1916]
Last Name: VANBIBBER,
First Name: EMMA, Middle Initial: L,
Date of Death: 10/10/16,
City: , County: SCIOTO,
Volume: 2077, Certificate #: 64388, Code: 73,

Last Name: VANBIBBER,
First Name: SIDNEY, Middle Initial: ,
Date of Death: 02/10/16,
City: , County: MONTGOMERY, Volume: 2105, Certificate #: 71387, Code: 57,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Haley Elaine Weese, 7, of 500 Highland Parkway, Apt. 5B, Upper Sandusky, diedat 1:55 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11, 1998, at her residence. She had suffered a two-year illness from a brain malignancy.
She was born Oct. 31, 1990, in Marion, to Kim L. Weese and Wendy Van Bibber, who both survive in Upper Sandusky.
Also surviving: are her step-mother, Tina Stansbery Weese; maternal grandmother, Marilyn Shaw of Chillicothe; maternal grandfather, Thomas VanBibber, Jr., of Washington Court House; paternal grandmother, Ethna Morrow of Morgantown, W.Va.; step-grandparents, James and Opal Stansbery of Upper Sandusky; great-grandparents, Thomas and Joann VanBibber of Upper Sandusky and Thomas and Shirley Souther of Washington Court House; great, great-grandparents Homer and Faye Conaway of Washington Court House and Fred and Garna Dalton of Florida.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER EMMA L
County Name: SCIOTO
Date of Death: 10/10/1916
Volume Number: 2077 Certificate Number: 64388
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER H L
County Name: HAMILTON
Date of Death: 5/24/1915
Volume Number: 1650 Certificate Number: 28596
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER HARDING
County Name: JACKSON
Date of Death: 11/11/1915
Volume Number: 1780 Certificate Number: 61162
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER COOK
County Name: VINTON
Date of Death: 6/12/1922
Volume Number: 3909 Certificate Number: 35876
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER LAURA
County Name: JACKSON
Date of Death: 5/30/1922
Volume Number: 3881 Certificate Number: 28948
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER FLORA A
County Name: JACKSON
Date of Death: 9/13/1924
Volume Number: 4546 Certificate Number: 80266
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBERE MAILIND E
County Name: HOCKING
Date of Death: 5/12/1926
Volume Number: 5053 Certificate Number: 22703
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER COLLIS J
County Name: JACKSON
Date of Death: 4/13/1934
Volume Number: 7491 Certificate Number: 24572
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WESLEYAN CEMETERY
Cincinnati, Ohio

VanBIBBER, MITTIE
84
12/31/1932

VanBIBER, MRS 10/19/1881
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Identification

Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina __________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna __________
John Van Bibber and Chloe Standiford
James Van Bibber and Louisa Reynolds
Cyrus Van Bibber and Rachel Timberlake
Cyrus Van Bibber and Sophia Baker
Marshall Baker Van Bibber and Harriett "Hattie" Agnes Ghent

1 Marshall Baker Van Bibber 1856 - 1921
. +Harriet (Hattie) Agnes Ghent 1864 - 1955
........ 2 Goldie Van Bibber 1885 - 1965
............ +Charles Fredrick Putnam 1885 - 1960
................... 3 Carl V. Putnam 1917 -
....................... +Florence Whiting Lee 1919 -
.............................. 4 James Lee Putnam 1947 -
.................................. +Nancy Mosman 1949 -
......................................... 5 Lisa Putnam 1975 -
......................................... 5 Carrie Putnam 1977 -
.............................. 4 Frederick Charles Putnam 1950 -
.................................. +Tena Voordepoort
......................................... 5 Crystal Putnam 1980 -
......................................... 5 Janel Putnam 1982 -
.............................. 4 Julia Sarah Putnam 1952 -
.................................. +Robert Lewis Bergman 1938 -
......................................... 5 Joel Robert Putnam 1986 -
........ 2 Eunice Van Bibber 1886 - 1898
........ 2 Clyde Van Bibber 1888 - 1978
............ +Roie Putnam 1896 - 1945
................... 3 Joseph Marshall Van Bibber 1916 - 1997
....................... +Maurene
.............................. 4 Marsha Marie Van Bibber
................... *2nd Wife of Joseph Marshall Van Bibber:
....................... +Shirley Seamans
.............................. 4 David Marshall Van Bibber
.................................. +Jennifer Karns
......................................... 5 David Marshall Van Bibber, Jr.
......................................... 5 Timothy Dale Van Bibber
......................................... 5 Christopher Van Bibber
.............................. *2nd Wife of David Marshall Van Bibber:
.................................. +Eillene ?
.............................. 4 Michael Neal Van Bibber
.................................. +Mary Housman
......................................... 5 Christine Elizabeth Van Bibber
.............................. 4 Riccie Lee Van Bibber
.............................. 4 Donna Rae Van Bibber
.................................. +--- Montgomery
......................................... 5 Lisa Montgomery
.............................. *2nd Husband of Donna Rae Van Bibber:
.................................. +William Boyle
......................................... 5 Malisa Boyle
......................................... 5 Lori Boyle
.............................. 4 Karen Roie Van Bibber
.................................. +Charles Forest
......................................... 5 William John Forest
......................................... 5 Misty Forest
......................................... 5 April Forest
......................................... 5 Amey Forest
......................................... 5 Melody Forest
................... 3 Elmer Neal Van Bibber 1922 - 1982
....................... +Peggy Irene Caves
.............................. 4 Mycal Avious Van Bibber 1947 -
.................................. +Charles Fredrick "Chip" Dandelos
......................................... 5 Mary Avious Van Bibber - Coiner 1972 -
............................................. +Swayne Evans
.............................. *2nd Husband of Mycal Avious Van Bibber:
.................................. +Larman Byron Coiner
........ 2 Bernice Van Bibber 1890 - 1898
........ 2 Rolfe Earl Van Bibber 1891 - 1973
............ +Maude Adkins 1912 -
........ *2nd Wife of Rolfe Earl Van Bibber:
............ +Mary Matilda (Tilda) Collins 1902 - 1983
................... 3 Marsha Nina "Pat" Van Bibber 1924 - 1960
....................... +-- Eustace
........ 2 Lola Van Bibber 1895 - 1898
........ 2 Delia Van Bibber 1897 - 1905
........ 2 Leslie Keyes Van Bibber 1899 - 1924
........ 2 Louise Margaret Van Bibber 1904 -
............ +Melvin L. Clarke 1904 - 1961
................... 3 David Marshall Clarke 1927 -
................... 3 Ann Carol Clarke 1931 -
....................... +Warren Stanley Nechodom 1930 -
.............................. 4 Mary Katherine Nechodom 1951 -
.................................. +Ronald Michael Kirkpatrick Abt. 1946 - 1983
.............................. *2nd Husband of Mary Katherine Nechodom:
.................................. +Milton James Case 1938 - 1990
.............................. *3rd Husband of Mary Katherine Nechodom:
.................................. +Erik van Bronkhorst 1960 –

.............................. 4 David Warren Nechodom 1953 -
.................................. +Patricia Rijon Sherman
......................................... 5 Anthony Warren Nechodom 1979 -
............................................. +Desiree Reed
.................................................... 6 Camise Katelyn Reed 1997 -
.............................. *2nd Wife of David Warren Nechodom:
.................................. +Faye Marie Van Dorn 1946 -
.............................. 4 James Stephen Nechodom 1954 -
.................................. +Amalia Valladares 1957 -
......................................... 5 Jason Daniel Nechodom 1982 -
......................................... 5 Jonathan Stephen Nechodom 1985 -
......................................... 5 Christopher Joseph Nechodom 1986 -
.............................. 4 Mark Andrew Nechodom 1955 -
.................................. +Lorena Martos 1958 -
.............................. *2nd Wife of Mark Andrew Nechodom:
.................................. +Christine Mary I. Miller 1949 -
......................................... 5 Nora Alexandra Nechodom 1993 -
.............................. 4 Laura Susan Nechodom 1957 -
.................................. +Mark Meredith Dierks 1954 -
.............................. *2nd Husband of Laura Susan Nechodom:
.................................. +Trevor James Lewis, Jr. 1943 -
.............................. 4 Kevin Edward Nechodom 1960 -
.................................. +Margo Susan Travis 1963 -
.............................. *2nd Wife of Kevin Edward Nechodom:
.................................. +Patricia Josephine Prombo 1949 -
.............................. 4 Daniel Joseph Nechodom 1963 -
.................................. +Rosemary Ann (Rosy) Marshall 1966 -
......................................... 5 Annemarie Louise Nechodom 1991 -
......................................... 5 Marshall Eli Nechodom 1995 -
.............................. 4 Nancy Louise Nechodom 1965 -
.................................. +Robert Ashley Tucker
.............................. *2nd Husband of Nancy Louise Nechodom:
.................................. +Allan Tracy Girdler 1937 -(Divorced 1998)
NOTE: Gravestone photos of Hattie and her Son Leslie can be found in our photo section.

A STORY ABOUT MARSHALL VAN BIBBER
By Ann Nechodom
Marshall Van Bibber was a man always on the move. As a contractor and builder he was often on the road late at night. On one such occasion he felt a hard pull on his team of horses as they strained against their load. He reached down to set the wagon brake and was knocked almost unconscious. He did reach home that night, but when he pulled into the yard he could hardly see because of a large flap of skin that hung down over his eye. He called to the two older boys to bring a pair of scissors. Clyde and Rolfe came running out to help and Hattie shoed Leslie and Louise off to bed to keep them out of the way. Rolfe cut off the dangling piece of scalp and tossed it into the grass. Clyde seeing the blood ran to get a horse and go for help; but when no horse left the barn Rolfe found where he had fainted and he rode to phone the doctor.

By daylight they found that the team had run over a long telephone wire that caught on the wagon and pulled until it snapped. If he hadn't reached down for the brake it would have decapitated him. No wonder Hattie worried when her menfolk were still gone after dark.
NOTE; THERE IS A SMALL MANUSCRIPT COLLECTION HELD AT THE WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY WHICH INCLUDES WORKS DONE BY GOLDIE VAN BIBBER PUTNAM WHICH INCLUDE:
AUTHOR: Putnam, Goldie Van Bibber, 1885-1965.
TITLE: PAPERS, 1950-1965.
DESCRIPT.: ca. 50 items.
SUBJECTS: Ferries -- Northwest, Pacific -- History.
Ferry County (Wash.) -- History.
Mines and mineral resources -- British Columbia -- History.
Silver King Mine (B.C.).
Stevens County (Wash.) -- History.
NOTES: Correspondence, research notes, and photocopies, manuscripts of newspaper articles on ferries, Silver King Mine, and Ferry and Stevens County history.
Gift, Mrs. Putnam, 1958-1965.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan ISAAC VAN BIBBER
Served in the War of 1812. Called into service Aug. 12, 1812 and assigned as a Private in Capt. Joseph Holmes Company of Infantry, 1 Reg't Ohio Militia. Is found in the 1840, and 1850 census in Athens County, Ohio. Died there. In 1850, is 72 and lists his occupation as a weaver. Born in Delaware. Served in the War of 1812.
Isaac1 Van Bibber was born 1778 in Delaware, and died 1851 in Athens Co, Ohio Buried in Chase Church Cemetery. He married Maria/Marie/Mary Walraven December 27, 1810 in Jefferson County, Ohio by James Retiest (sp).
Isaac Van Bibber left an estate which he owed on and Loyal VanBibber had to settle the bills by order of the sheriff. James VanBibber is mentioned also:
Marriage Notes for Isaac Van Bibber and Maria/Marie/Mary Walraven:
State of Ohio- Jefferson county court clerk- I do hereby certify that Isaac Vanbibber and Mary Walravuen his wife was married by me on the twenty seventh day of December 1810

Merritt VanBibber- b. Aug 22, 1820 d Dec 12,1895, buried-Center Grove Cemetery

Father-Isaac, Mother-Maria b 1793 d mar 24, 1866 buried Center Grove Cemetery

Wife-Mary Axtell b May 8,1825 d Aug 30, 1876, aged 51yrs 3mo22d, Buried Center Grove Cemetery; # 2 Wife- Mrs. Naomi (Lakey) Weisner b 1842 married Nov. 23, 1879. She married Alonzo Greenlee June 6, 1881.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FAMILY OF LOYAL VAN BIBBER:

Loyal VanBibber died May 4, 1864
and is buried in Cross Roads cemetery, Athens County, Ohio.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Susan (Susannah) VanBibber
Daughter of Loyal and Susan Elizabeth Robinson
(29 Aug 1853 - 17 Oct 1938) born in Vinton Co., OH.
Married (1st) Mordecai West
(3 Nov 1844 - 12 May 1884)
on October 17, 1870 in Vinton Co., OH. Mordecia was born in Muskingum County, OH. the son of Mortimer West and Elizabeth A. Humphrey. There would be four children from
this marriage, with the twins dying young.
NOTE: Mordecia (Mortica) West died May 12, 1884 and is buried in Putnam cemetery, Vinton County, Ohio.

Susan married (2nd) John Trainer
(25 Sep 1856 - 28 Dec 1938) on February 22, 1886, in Vinton Co., OH. John was the son of Matthew Trainer and Mahala Ferrell. There would be two daughters from this marriage. Mordecia is buried in Putnam cemetery, and John and Susan are buried in Hamden cemetery, Vinton Co., OH. Children:

1. Cora Bell West (21 Jun 1872 - 28 Jan 1923)
2. John Wesley West (16 Dec 1874 - 26 Mar 1965)
3. Callie D. West (4 Jun 1878 - 20 Jun 1880)
4. Calvin L. West (4 Jun 1878 - 7 Jun 1878)
5. Lenora Bell Trainer
(1 Apr 1887 - 31 Oct 1983)
6. Myrtle E. Trainer (Nov 1890)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mary Wahiuen (sp)
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber and Margaret J. Allen
Clarence H. VanBibber, born in Vinton County, Ohio. April 29, 1886
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mary Wahiuen (sp)
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber and Margaret J. Allen
Clarence H. VanBibber, born April 29, 1886 in Vinton County, Ohio.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mary Wahieun (sp)
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber and Margaret J. Allen
Erastus VanBibber, Born April 29, 1894 in Vinton County, Ohio.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Albert VanBibber and Phebe Eakins
Mary D. VanBibber, died June 10, 1883
and is buried in Cross Roads cemetery, Athens County, Ohio.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mariah Walraven
Loyal VanBibber and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson
Cook VanBibber, died June 12, 1922
and is buried in Putnam cemetery, Vinton County, Ohio.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Mary Wahiuen (sp)
James K. VanBibber and Amanda Melvina Rariden
William VanBibber and Nancy Jane Brown

On April 12, 1874 William VanBibber married Nancy Jane Brown in Athens County, Ohio. After the death of William, his widow Nancy Jane Brown VanBibber married William Burt.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac Van Bibber and Hester op Den Graeff
Jacob Isaac Van Bibber and Christina ?
Isaac Jacobs Van Bibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter Van Bibber and Anna ?
Peter Van Bibber 11, and Margery Bounds
Peter Van Bibber 111, and Sarah Yoakum
Jacob Van Bibber and Unknown
Martha J. O. Van Bibber and Michael Sutton
Ann Mary Sutton and William Albert Van Bibber
Olive Van Bibber and Henry Tafel
Dorothy Alene Tafel and Elmer Austin Gillihan
Gordon Gillihan & Beverley A. Hill

and

Isaac Van Bibber and Hester op Den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs Van Bibber and Christina ?
Isaac Jacobs Van Bibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter Van Bibber and Anna ?
Peter Van Bibber 11, and Margery Bounds
Peter Van Bibber 111, and Sarah Yoakum
Jacob Van Bibber and Unknown
Isaac Van Bibber and Missouri Ann Sutton
William Albert Van Bibber and Ann Mary Sutton
Olive Van Bibber and Henry Tafel
Dorothy Alene Tafel and Elmer Austin Gillihan
Gordon Gillihan & Beverley A. Hill
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan From the Philadelphische Zeitung, June 1732, the first German newspaper published in America, by Benjamin Franklin. (Translation by Martin R. Martzal.)

It is herby made known that Hendrick van Bebber, who for many years practiced as a Dr. of Medicine with good success, has settled down here to live. From him the best and safest Gbymische medicines which he himself prepares are to be had. Among others, the excellent so called - Englische Saltz or Sal mirable which is for all a useful purgative and also a proven aid against fever and dropsy. Whoever is in need of any of his products can contact him in Laetitia Court where he is residing with Arent Hassert, a merchant in Philadelphia.

(Note: The meaning of the word Gbymische is uncertain; Englishche Saltz or Sal mirable is epsom salt.)
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan From Pioneer Families of Missouri By Bryan & Rose, Published in St. Louis in 1876.

John BURT, of Orleans Co., Vt. removed to Ohio in 1815. His three sons, John A., Henry, and George W. came to Calloway Co., Mo. from 1819 to 1821. They were Millwrights by trade, and built the first water mill in Montgomery County, for Col. Irvin PITTMAN. After a number of years the mill was moved away and the large water wheel left standing. The action of the water of course kept it constantly turning, and the negroes and a few superstitious white people of the vicinity imagined that spirits had something to do with it, and could not be induced to go near the place.

The BURTS also built the first water mill in Calloway County. Henry BURT died in 1823, leaving no family. John represented Calloway County in the legislature four years, was Judge of the County seven years, and died in 1855. He married Bathsheba FULKERSON of St. Charles Co. and they had nine children. Major George W. Burt served in the war of 1812, when he was only 15 years of age, and was captured by the British. He married ERRETTA VanBIBBER, daughter of Major Isaac VanBIBBER, and a great-granddaughter of Daniel BOONE. When he asked the consent of her father to the marriage, the old gentleman replied in a loud tone of voice that he could have her if he wanted her, but she was a "contrary stick", and if he could do anything with her, he was welcome to her; but he didn't want him to send her back on his hands. Major Burt gladly accepted the "contrary stick" and obtained a good wife by doing so.

They prospered beyond their expectations and accumulated a fortune. Major Burt was a money loaner for many years, but would never accept more interest than the law allowed him. He always paid every cent he owed and collected all that was due him. He was a good man and respected by the entire community where he lived. He died in March, 1876, in his 78th year, leaving a widow and one son, Huron. They also had a daughter but she died many years ago. Major Burt was in poor health for about 30 years before his death, and his complaint often carried him apparently to the verge of his grave.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Presley Vespicious Nebergall
Father Jacob Nebergall
b. 1796, d. 20 November 1881
Mother Elizabeth Masterson
b. 1793, d. 13 March 1866
He married, at age 26, Felicity Brown VanBibber, age 22, daughter of David Campbell Robinson VanBibber and Jane Ann Williams, on Thursday, 27 January 1859 at Scott County, Iowa, USA.
He was born in West Virginia, in 1832, and pursued his education in his native state. In 1854, when a young man of twenty years, he came to Scott county with his father, Jacob Nebergall, who settled in Blue Grass township, where he purchased a partially improved farm. Later he bought more land at different times and improved his acreage, devoting his remaining days to general agricultural pursuits.

After coming to Iowa, Presley B. Nebergall lived with his parents on the home farm and assisted his father in the cultivation and improvement of the fields until his marriage, which was celebrated on the 27th of January, 1859. On that date he wedded Miss Felicity B. Van Bibber, who was also a native of West Virginia. They began their domestic life on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres near the home of his father and there Mr. Nebergall continued to cultivate his fields until his life's labors were ended in death on the 22d of September, 1878. He was diligent and persevering and, working on persistently year by year, he won that measure of prosperity which always crowns earnest and indefatigable effort.
From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago
NOTE: He was buried in the Blue Grass Cemetery, located in Scott County, Iowa, USA.
CHILDREN:
John Franklin Nebergall b. 5 Dec 1859
Jacob Andrew Nebergall b. 21 Sep 1861
Sarah Lavinia Nebergall b. 17 Oct 1865
Edward Lee Nebergall b. 13 Mar 1871
Grace Nebergall b. 7 Mar 1876
George N. Nebergall b. 1 Jan 1878,
d. 18 May 1902
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Harriet Van Bibber was born in Kentucky in 1845. She was the daughter of Cyrus Van Bibber and Mary S. Timberlake Van Bibber. On August 31, 1865 she married Richard Landrum Burchett in Greenup County, Kentucky.

Landrum Burchett was born on January 21, 1841 in Floyd County, Kentucky, the son of William J. Burchett and Frances Emily Auxier Burchett. Landrum was raised on a farm in Floyd County, Kentucky and in his youth he was employed as a clerk in a mercantile store. When the Civil War broke out, he was surrounded by friends and neighbors who were in sympathy with the

Confederacy. The Auxier family were strong Unionists and Landrum enlisted as a private with Company A of the 39th Kentucky Infantry. He was involved in several skirmishes and slightly wounded. In 1865 he was mustered out with the rank of Second Lieutenant.

While visiting his Grandmother Auxier's family in Greenup County, he met Harriet Van Bibber and they moved to Mason City, Illinois shortly after their wedding. In Mason City, Landrum was employed as a clerk. They later moved to New Holland, Illinois where he formed a partnership with G.W. LaForge and established the first mercantile business in New Holland.

Landrum also served as postmaster of New Holland holding the office until November 4, 1885. On March 14, 1885, a disastrous fire destroyed the town of New Holland and the store of Burchett and Company was completely destroyed. At the urging of their friends, Landrum and Harriet immediately telegraphed for new goods and on March 16 they resumed business. During the summer of 1885 they built the first brick building in New Holland on the old store site.

Landrum and Harriet were the oldest settlers in New Holland and were prominent citizens of central Illinois. Richard Landrum Burchett died on April 13, 1907 and Harriet Van Bibber Burchett died the same year. They are buried in Richmond Grove Cemetery in New Holland, Illinois. They were the parents of one son, Oscar Burchett.
Aug 21, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Henry VanBibber and Catherine Ann Bougard
Hester VanBibber and Andrew Peterson
Jacob Peterson and Grace VanDyke
Mary Peterson and Phillip Reading, Jr.
Maria Reading and William Henry Ward
Ellen Ward and Robert T. Gilmor, III
Harry W. Gilmore and Mentoria Nixon Strong

Harry Gilmor was born January 24, 1838 at "Glen Ellen", the family estate in Baltimore County, Maryland. After homesteading in Wisconsin and Nebraska, he returned to Maryland in time to join the newly formed Baltimore County Horse Guards as a corporal.
After the efforts of the citizens of Baltimore to prevent the movement of Federal troops through the city, the Horse Guards received orders to burn several bridges north of the city to prevent further troop movements toward Washington City.
Following the occupation of Baltimore by Federal troops under Brigadier General Benjamin "Beast" Butler, Gilmor was one of many to be arrested and imprisoned in Fort McHenry. After his release, he traveled South and joined the command of Colonel Turner Ashby on August 31, 1861.
In March 1862, he was commissioned Captain of Company F, Twelfth Virginia Cavalry. Captain Gilmor served throughout the Valley Campaign. At times, he was on special assignment to General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.
He was arrested during the Sharpsburg Campaign, while in the Baltimore area visiting family. He spent five months in prison.
He participated in the Battle of Brandy Station and was sighted in the after action reports of General Fitzhugh Lee and General J.E.B. Stuart for his conduct in this engagement.
On May 27, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of Major and asked to raise an independent battalion of cavalry. Before he could complete this assignment, the Gettysburg campaign interceded. During the battle, Major Gilmor was assigned command of the First and Second Maryland Cavalry, under General George Steuart's infantry brigade. Major Gilmor was the Provost Marshal of the town of Gettysburg while it was occupied.

Gilmor had organized six companies of partisan rangers by September of 1863. His command's area of operation was the Shenandoah Valley and parts of "West" Virginia. General J.E.B. Stuart ordered Gilmor to attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in February of 1864.

After the defeat of Major General Lew Wallace at Monocacy on July 9, 1864, Gilmor's command acted as the spearhead for the raid around Baltimore in 1864 with General Bradley T. Johnson's infantry command.

While assigned to scout duty under General Jubal Early, Colonel Gilmor single-handedly captured a company of Federal infantry. Gilmor and Holmes Conrad, a man under his command, later captured more than 50 troopers from the First New Jersey Cavalry.

Colonel Gilmor was ordered by General Early to take his command to Hardy County, West Virginia. He was to combine with other partisans in the area and attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Colonel Gilmor was finally captured in Hardy County, on February 4, 1865. He remained a prisoner at Fort Warren until July 24, 1865.

For several years after the war, Harry Gilmor lived in New Orleans, where he married Miss Mentoria Strong. Upon his return to Maryland, he was elected colonel of cavalry in the Maryland National Guard. He also served as Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1874 to 1879. He was a member of the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland and it's Vice-President in 1882.

Harry Gilmor died in Baltimore on March 4, 1883 at the age of forty-five. He was interred on "Confederate Hill" in Loudon Park Cemetery. To this day, people gather at his graveside on the anniversary of his birth to honor his life long service to his country.

From the website of Colonel Harry W. Gilmore Camp, #1388, Sons of Confederate Veterans
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan DESCRIPTION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays

EWING A. VAN BIBBER;

VAN BIBBER, EWING A., born in Kentucky about 1813, enrolled in Callaway County, Missouri, and mustered in, age 32, at Ft. Leavenworth, June 24, 1846, to serve one year during the war with Mexico as Corporal, Captain Charles B. Rogers' Company H, 1st Missouri Mounted Infantry; the Regiment, under command of Colonel Alexander W. Donipan, left Fort Leavenworth, June 26, and arrived at Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 18, 1846; Company H. marched down the Rio Grande and on November 24 arrived at Valverde, the rendezvous for the invasion of Chihuahua; after a fight at Brazito, arrived with other troops at El Paso on December 27, 1846.

The expedition under Colonel Doniphan left El Paso February 8, defeated the Mexican Army at the battle of Sacramento, February 28, and arrived at the City of Chihuahua on March 1, 1847; left Chihuahua April 25 and arrived at Parras May 14; marched from there via Saltillo to Camargo on the Rio Grande where he was promoted to Commissary Sergeant on May 29; the Company muster-out roll shows him on detached services from May 30, 1847, to drive horses to Missouri, the Regiment being ordered to take water transportation to New Orleans and thence up the Mississippi to St. Louis.

Came from Colusa County, California, to Arizona, early in 1863, late in October of that year he and Theodore Green Rusk were with Henry Wickenburg when the Vulture mine was first discovered and on November 24 they and three others posted a location notice thereon but nothing further was done; on May 9, 1864, Wickenburg relocated the ledge and proceeded, with the help of four other miners, to take out ore from which gold was extracted by arastras located on the Hassayampa River; Van Bibber was not a party to a law suit in which Judge Joseph P. Allyn decided in October, 1864, that Theodore Green Rusk had acquired no interest in the property but later derived a benefit according to a communication from Prescott printed in the Sacramento Union of April 11, 1866, which reported that Wickenburg had received $25,000 in cash for 300 feet of the Vulture lode and then stated;
There were other persons beside Wickenburg who laid claim to the feet sold, and one of them, Major Van Bibber of Colusa County, received some $10,000 to quit his claim.

The following references to him where printed in the Prescott Arizona Miner:

October 20, 1866 -- Beaver Valley, on Ash creek and southwest from Woolsey's ranch about 18 miles, is likely to be well settled. Among those who have taken up ranches there, and propose to improve them at once, are Messrs. John A. Rush, Major Van Bibber, Dr. Alsap, John M. Boggs, John P. Osborn, Berry Dodson, Theodore Boggs and Wormsley. The climate is much milder than in Prescott, and the soil is very rich.

September 12, 1867 -- A few days since, 64 Indians visited Boggs and Van Bibber's ranch on the Agua Fria and seemed to be very friendly. They are the same whose chiefs were lately at Fort Whipple. On Sunday some Indians stole a mule from Mr. Dickason, at Leonora valley.

September 19, 1867 -- Major Van Bibber, who has been sick nigh unto death, is now past the crisis, and feeling much better. The Major has had a hard time of it, and we hope he soon may be all right again.

Died at Prescott, A.T., October 1, 1867, aged 55;
the following is extracted from an obituary published in the Miner:
He was an old resident of California and, was, likewise, a pioneer of Arizona, having come here early in '63. He was always to be found in the van of civilization, and had all the good qualities of the American pioneer. We, who knew his jovial and kind disposition, mourn his loss and will treasure his memory.

Sources of information
1. The Arizona Miner, Prescott, October 26, 1864, October 20, 1866, 2:1; September 12, 2:1, September 19, 2:2; October 1, 3:1 and October 5, 1867, 3:2 (obituary).
2. The Sacramento Union, April 11, 1866, 3:3.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Daily Picayune, New Orleans, March 22, 1850: The following list of passengers sailed yesterday in the steamship Portland for California, via Brazos Santiago:

VanBibber (Van Bibber ?), E. A.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From the website: The Daily Picayune New Orleans, Louisiana Ship & Wagon Train Passengers for California 1850.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Note: Ewing A. Van Bibber was recorded on the 1850 census for Sacramento County, California.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Robert VanBebber and Sarah P. Warner

Robert Van Bebber was the son of James Van Bebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover. He married Sarah "Sally" P. Warner and they were recorded on the 1830 census of White County, Tennessee. There is another entry in the court records of White County where Robert sold the slave (Nancy) to Samuel Brown on October 22, 1833.

On February 23, 1835, Robert purchased 80 acres of land in Greene County, Illinois. Robert and his wife were recorded on the 1840 census of Greene County with no children.

They were later recorded on the 1850 census of Greene County. Living with them is China Owens, age 16, the daughter of James G. Owens and Hannah Van Bebber. China was a niece to Robert, as Hannah was Robert's sister. Also living in the home is a Henry Van Bebber, age 26, born in Tennessee. It is a good possibility this Henry is the son of Robert's brother, Isaac Van Bebber and his wife Hannah Long. The 1830 and 1840 census indicates Robert and Sarah had no children.

On March 30, 1857, Robert died and eleven days later Sarah died on April 10, 1857. They are buried beside each other in the Scottville West Cemetery, near Scottville, Macoupin County, Illinois. Their tombstones read the following:

Robert VanBebber - Died - Mar. 30, 1857 - Aged 58 ys. 6 mos. 15ds.

Sarah P. wife of R. VanBebber - Died - Apr. 10, 1857 - Aged 57 ys. 8 mos. 26 ds.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Van Bibber, H.
State: Louisiana
Year: 1850 County: Caddo Township: Shreveport
Roll: M432_230 Page: 334 Image: 180
NAME AGE GEN OCC Real E. Place of BIRTH

H. Van Bibber 53 M Hotels 15000 S. Carolina
Nancy E. Van Bibber 57 F Wife "
Sam Van Bibber 30 M Georgia
Flasri... Van Bibber 23 M Clerk "
Thomas Van Bibber 19 M Clerk "
Philip Ropin 25 M Clerk Virginia

Notes:
This is Henry Van Tromp Van Bibber (b. 8 Feb 1798, Charleston Dist.-S.C.)
Nancy E. Leak (b. 27 Nov 1799) source family bible. Typo on her age, she is 52.
Sam Van Bibber (Van Bibber, Samuel b. 1819 d. May 9, 1896) source A NECROLOGY OF GRAVES AT THE OLD OAKLAND CEMETERY OF SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA, Compiled by Eric J. Brock 1986 - 1987 Shreveport, Louisiana 1988. Pages 50, 77, & 106.
F ? Van Bibber. I think this is F. J. Van Bibber. The census taker scribbled his first name. The best I can make it out is FLASRIN. Here are the letters I can make out FLAS?I?.
Thomas H. Van Bibber was born December 14th 1830, source family bible.
Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers & Confederate Commands, - Vol. I-III (3)

Andrew B. Booth

New Orleans, LA: np, 1920.

Volume 3, "V", page 906

Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. 3rd Batty. (Benton's) La. Lt. Arty. Roll of Prisoners of War of furloughed and detailed men, C. S. A., Paroled Shreveport, La., June 7, 1865. Res. New Orleans, La.

Van Bibber, F. J., Pvt. Co. G, Confed. Grds. Regt. La. Mil. Roll for March 8 to April 30, 1862 (only Roll on file), En. March 8, 1862, New Orleans. Roll states Present. Note: Transfd. by Gov. Thos. O. Moore to Maj. Gen. M. Lovell. C. S. A., for local defense Page 906 of the City of New Orleans and its approaches.

Van Bibber, Samuel, Pvt. Co. I, 27th La. Inf. Roll of Prisoners of War of detachments and regiments, La. and Ark. troops, C. S. A., Paroled Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Res. Shreveport, La.
Source: Dean Starr
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
?? VanBibber and Ann ??
Henry Van Tromp VanBibber and Nancy E. Leak
Thomas H. Van Bibber and Sarah J. Leak
William Henry Van Bibber and Gladys D. Merle

William Henry Van Bibber is the child of Thomas H. Van Bibber (b. 1830 in Charleston, SC) and Sarah J. Leak (b. 1834 in Georgia). William was born in Houston, Texas. His father Thomas died there in 1861 of typhoid fever. Other known children in the family are Nancy Jessie (b. 1859) and Mary Louisa Duvall Van Bibber (b. 1855). Nancy married James Knox Polk Thrower in 1883.

William lived in Atlanta for a time presumably with or near James and his sister Nancy, where he learned the printing trade. He worked at the newspaper in Shreveport. Shreveport is where his father Thomas was raised. In 1890 he was in Savannah, Georgia as a printer at the Morning News on 42 Lincoln Street. Later he went to work at the U.S. Mint in Washington D.C..

The following is an article from 1885 about their wedding. The announcement is credited to the collection of Randy Grey of Kansas City, Missouri.
Van Bibber-Merle-In New Orleans, Thursday, Apr 3rd. at 3:30 o'clock pm, by Rev H.H. Waters, rector of the St. Paul's church, Mr. W.H. Van Bibber of Shreveport and Mrs. Gladys Merle of New Orleans.
The groom formerly lived in Atlanta, Ga. and is a nephew of Sam Van Bibber. Esq. of this city. He is a compositor employed on this paper, and is a genial and clever gentleman. We extend our congratulations and wish Mr. and Mrs Van Bibber a long life of happiness and prosperity.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
HOUSE KEEPING AT THE VAN BIBBER HOTEL

? Van Bibber - Ann ? (Interned as Ann Van Bibber Little)
Henry Van Tromp Van Bibber - Nancy E. Leak
You would certainly like to think that your ancestors were beyond reproach. However, sometimes you find things that "burst that bubble" and you wonder if you should ever tell anyone about it. I found something and debated whether to send it in or not. I decided, "it is what it is" and genealogy is about the facts, so here you go.
Henry was born in Charleston, South Carolina, later moved to Georgia, then Alabama before arriving in Louisiana. In the 1850 census Henry Van Tromp Van Bibber owned a hotel in Shreveport. In August of 1846 Mr. John Hobart Heald of Doaksville, Ok. stayed at Henry and Nancy’s hotel. By the tone of his journal he did not seem to be having a good day at all. Perhaps it was the heat or perhaps the Van Bibber Hotel in Shreveport did not deserve even one star, you decide!
Excerpt from "Chronicles of Oklahoma"
"Mr. Heald bought and hauled the goods for his store at Doaksville from Shreveport, the principal head of navigation on the Red River. He told in his "Diary" of his trip by horseback from Doaksville to Shreveport, a distance of 180 miles by the road of that time, the summer of 1846. "
Page 317.
"Arriving at Shreveport, Mr. Heald wrote from "Van Bibber’s Hotel", Saturday, August 22, 1846."
"Sitting at my window the town possesses a very motley appearance, wood houses, log cabins, and brick stores all mingled up together with great irregularity, all characteristic of a new town. Mud, little Negroes, hogs of all sizes and sexes perambulate through the streets, along with the light and tasty buggy or carriage of the opulent planter. Sorry looking nags stand at different corners whisking their tails to drive away the flies. The puff of a steam mill is heard in the distance and the rattle of the billiard ball, accords with the sound of the mechanic’s hammer and plane. That new looking unpainted building is the Methodist church, where there is to be service this evening, and those cottage looking edifices to the west are some private residences of merchants."
"The old man is a water carrier. With his horse cart & hogshead he supplies you with 3 buckets daily at two bits a week, hauling it about ¾ of a mile, and earning, I am informed, about $60 a month at his occupation. Placards are about every door of the trader. Bacon, flour, whiskey, lard, sugar, coffee, etc., seem to be the main staples. Real estate is said to be increasing rapidly in value, and I think some 10,000 bales of cotton are sent forward from here annually, and the supply is increasing."
"The corpulent lady asleep on the sofa, with the little negro to fan her is the Landlady, who presides at one extremity of the table. I am fortunately assigned a pleasant front room, having something of an unpleasant odour about it, but with a fine air, and a commanding prospect of the main street, called Texas St. The former occupant has not moved his books. Let us take a look at this pile. Calhoun’s speeches, Oregon and California, Byron, Mary de Clifford, Forestdays, Penny Magazine, Prairie Bird, a box of Champion’s Pills, vial of Paregoric, & a box of matches comprises the literary furniture. One skin-seated & 2 broken wood-seated comprise the chairs. The table of pine, which was rather spattered with sperm, during my absence to dinner has been covered with a cotton spread."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mrs. Ann Little died on June 3, 1851, at the residence of her son, H. Van Bibber, of Shreveport, Louisiana. Mrs. Ann Little was a native of Charleston District, South Carolina. She was 83 years of age and she was a member of the Baptist Church.

Southern Christain Advocate, December 12, 1851 as printed in Marriage and Deaths from the Southern Christain Advocate. Volume #1, 1837 - 1860, Page #253.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Panthea Grant Boone and Lilburn William Boggs
Thomas Oliver Boggs and Maria Rumalda Luna
Minnie Boone Boggs and George Alexander Bushnell

GEORGE ALEXANDER BUSHNELL

George A. Bushnell and Edward W. Fox operated the first store in Clayton. George came from Cheltenham, England, and was a graduate of Oxford University. His father was an Episcopal Vicar as were several of his ancestors. They ranked high in English society.

George came to America in 1880 as an auditor for the Maxwell Cattle Company. This company was formed in London by the Most Noble William Frago Montague, the Duke of Manchester, the Earl of Rosslyn, Right Honorable Francis Robert St. Clair, John Guthrie Smith, William B. Strong and William Dowd. George lived in Cimarron where the company had established headquarters. Business took him to Springer and Raton where he met Minnie Boone Boggs, daughter of Thomas O. and Romalda Luna Boggs. They were married December 9, 1884, in Springer.

Mr. Bushnell was a polished gentleman and one of the most universally admired and respected men in the Territory. He and Mr. Fox were partners in a profitable mercantile business in Raton but they believed the new town of Clayton would offer larger opportunities. They were the first merchants to establish a business there. Trade was excellent. After several years, Bob Ervien and John Hill organized a corporation to develop the Fox Brothers & Bushnell enterprise. The name was changed to Clayton Commercial Company. Mr. Bushnell lived only a short while after this merger. He was stricken with pneumonia. His death was a shock to the entire community and his loss irreparable.

George Bushnell was connected with the history of Clayton from the earliest days of its development. He was devoted to the public interest, fostering every object calculated to promote education and general welfare. Esteemed for his genuine worth and sincerity of purpose, his passing left a place no one else could fill.

Clayton, the Friendly Town in Union County, New Mexico, Authors Mrs. Harry Thompson, William H. Halley, A.B.M.D. Collaborator: Simon Herstein
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan WE LIVE WITH THE BLESSING OF FREEDOM THE FOLLOWING NINETEEN MEMBERS
OF THE VAN BIBBER FAMILY GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR IN WWII.

KIA - Killed in Action
DOW - Died of Wounds
NBD - Non Battle Death

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
Aaron Alvice Yoakum and Lucinda Elizabeth Duke
Sarah Ann Yoakum and Robert Wesley Hollingsworth
Susan Belle Hollingsworth and Daniel Bascom Ballew
Daniel B. Ballew

Pvt D. B. Ballew
World War II
Branch of Service: U.S. Marine Corps
Hometown: Cowgill, MO
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Levicy VanBebber and John Liford
William Prior Liford and Sarah Elizabeth Pugh
James Robert Liford and Alice Spicer
Fern May Liford and James Edward Baker
John Dewey Baker

S SG John D. Baker
World War II
ID: 15063204
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Marion County, IN
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour
Martha Eliza VanBibber and Pleasant M. Miller
Savannah Tennessee Miller and William Corn Everhart
Willie Harvey Everhart and Clara Mae Dunavant

PFC Willie H. Everhart
World War II
ID: 38693431
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Briscoe County, TX
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Mary Malinda VanBebber and Powell Hamilton Sharp
John B. Sharp and Nancy Ann Youngblood
Nancy S. J. Sharp and Chestnut Wade Holcomb
Benjamin Harrison Holcomb and Ollie Leona Rich
Chester Benjamin Holcomb

S SG Chester B. Holcomb
World War II
ID: 38181747
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Caddo County, OK
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Levicy VanBebber and James Liford
Lazarus Liford and Elizabeth Huckworth
James Liford and Margaret Elizabeth Campbell
Thomas Liford and Vernie Early
Monroe Liford and Rachel White
Melbern Liford
PFC Melbern Liford
World War II
ID: 35809400
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Wayne County, MI
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
George VanBeber and Mary Elizabeth Tinsley
James VanBever and Mary Ann Robbins
John Calvin VanBever and Mariah Jane Hall
Gracie VanBever and Taylor Jefferson McCreary
Frederick Earl McCreary
Aviation Radioman 1c
Frederick Earl McCreary
World War II
Branch of Service: U.S. Navy
Hometown: Barbourville, KY
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
George VanBeber and Mary Elizabeth Tinsley
James VanBever and Mary Ann Robbins
John Calvin VanBever and Mariah Jane Hall
Gracie VanBever and Taylor Jefferson McCreary
John Raymond McCreary
Pvt John R. McCreary
World War II
ID: 14158312
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Harlan County, KY
Status: NBD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Nancy VanBibber and Moses Haney
Aaron Haney and Melissa Jane Claypool
Jessie Ann Haney and Charles H. McGaffey
Craig Wesley McGaffey and Dessa Haverly Lenord
David Gordon McGaffey
Sgt Gordon D. McGaffey
World War II
ID: 6818165
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: King County, WA
Status: NBD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Margaret VanBebber and David Ross, Sr.
David Ross, Jr. and Martha Jayne
Daniel Boone Ross and Nancy Ellen Fannin
Daniel Sanford Ross and Cora Belle Kelley
Winfred Clarence Ross
PFC Winfred C. Ross
World War II
ID: 13072728
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Ohio
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Susannah VanBibber and Thomas Hickerson
Melissa Hickerson and Fountain Baker Sampson
Elijah G. Sampson and Louisa Flynn
Albert Sampson and Georgia May Cochran
Bert Thomas Sampson
2 LT Bert T. Sampson
World War II
ID: 0-450765
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Clatsop County, OR
Status: NBD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
John Jesse VanBibber and Rachel Greenlee
Elizabeth VanBibber and Richard Tillis
Clark Tillis and Eleanor Pontsler
Samuel Pontsler Tillis and Laura Edith Kelly
Arnold Kelly Tillis and Elsie Olo Arnold
Arnold Kelly Tillis, Jr.
Seaman 2c Arnold Kelly Tillis, Jr.
World War II
Branch of Service: U.S. Navy
Hometown: Onawa, IA
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Gabriel VanBebber and Barbara Carlock
Marlena VanBebber and John McCrunnell Cawood
Emily Cawood and William Manuel Wilson
Sarah Catherine Wilson and Thomas Marshall Tinnel
James Richard Tinnel and Clearsey Williams
Clarence Tinnel
Pvt Clarence Tinnel
World War II
ID: 34285805
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Knox County, TN
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
Marcellus Yoakum and Sarah Ann Cawood
David M. Yoakum and Rachel M. Moyers
John Calvin Yoakum and Allie Dalia Houchins
Opal Lee Yoakum and Harold C. Turpin
2 LT Harold C. Turpin
World War II
ID: 0-807541
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Claiborne County, TN
Status: FOD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Ezekial VanBibber and Susan Rice
Harding VanBibber and Elizabeth Jane Artis
George David VanBibber and Flora A. Gould
Chester VanBibber
Cpl Chester H. VanBibber
World War II
ID: 13018657
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Campbell County, VA
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
David C.R. VanBibber and Jane Ann Williams
Moses Hill VanBibber and Joanna D. Pierson
Joseph Franklin VanBibber and Nancy Arabella Drake
Benjamin Franklin VanBibber and Clara Idessa Edens
James Warren VanBibber
T SG James W. VanBibber
World War II
ID: 15394471
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Kanawha County, WV
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
George VanBeber and Mary Elizabeth Tinsley
James VanBever and Mary Ann Robbins
Amanda Jane VanBever and Nathaniel L. Willeford
Walter Willeford and Marie Edna Sunderman
Adolph N. Willeford
Sgt Adolph N. Willeford
World War II
ID: 35787154Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Butler County, OH
Status: NBD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~James Van Bibber and Sarah Margaret Bradburn
Elizabeth Van Bibber and Elbert Theodore Eggers
Bessie Jane Eggers and Charley Edward Worthington
Elbert T. Worthington
PFC Elbert T. Worthington
World War II
ID: 35202019
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Greenup County, KY
Status: DOW
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
Aaron Alvice Yoakum and Lucinda Elizabeth Duke
Euin Yoakum and Emily Jane Thomas
Jesse Harvey Yoakum and Blanche Job Goe
Donaphon Albert Yoakum
Aviation Ordnanceman 2c
Donaphon Albert Yoakum
World War II
ID: 03779096
Branch of Service: U.S. Navy
Hometown: Napa, CA
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
Moses Yoakum and Elizabeth Grimes
George Washington Yoakum and Julia Ann Schooler
Moses Edward Yoakum and Margaret Ann Clark
Millard Clead Yoakum and Jennie Bell Whitmer
Earl Donald Yoakum
PFC Earl D. Yoakum
World War II
ID: 37239574
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Ray County, MO
Status: KIA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Cook L. VanBibber was born 7 Apr 1862 in Meigs County, the son of Loyal VanBibber (born 17 Sep 1822, died 4 May 1864) and his wife Sarah Elizabeth Robinson (born 19 Aug 1825, died 26 Mar 1904). His mother was the daughter of Aaron and Susan Bolin Robinson and granddaughter of William and Mary Lowe Robinson and Benjamin and Mary Lee Bolin.

Cook VanBibber's brother Robinson VanBibber (born 1846) enlisted for three years service on 2 Aug 1862 as a private in the 92nd Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company A. Robinson VanBibber was killed 25 Nov 1863 in the Battle of Mission Ridge, Tennessee and was buried at Chattanooga.

Cook VanBibber had three other brothers and two sisters: Hamilton C. (born 1847, died 20 Feb 1897), who married Rhoda Skelley (born 9 Dec 1850, died 19 Jul 1894), whose first husband was Asa Metcalfe, Oscar (born 1851), who married Margaret Wilson; Susannah (born 29 Aug 1853, died 17 Oct 1938), who married first Mordecai A. West and second John Trainer; and Mariah (born 21 Mar 1857, died 8 Feb 1932), who married John Cline (born October 1852, died 1933).

Cook VanBibber married Margaret "Margie" Jane Allen in Vinton County on 19 Jun 1885. Margie Allen was born 2 May 1864, the daughter of Josiah and Louisa Blackburn Allen.

Cook and Margie Allen VanBibber had four children: Clarence H. (born 29 Apr 1886), who married first Jennie C. Davis (born 5 Oct 1889, died 7 Dec 1907) and second Emma Harkins (born Oct 1892), daughter of Aaron and Mary Huston Harkins; Louisa (born September 1889), who married Clarence Davis (born 1880); Erastus (born Apr 1894), who married Maggie B. Markins (born 1896); and Emma M. (born January 1897), who married Cash Zimmerman (born 1 Oct 1885), son of Henry and Jediah Mercer Zimmerman.

A news item from Bolen's Mills dated 27 Jul appeared in the McArthur Democrat Enquirer on Thursday 30 Jul 1896: "Knox Township has a new post office. Its name is Van. It will be found every day in the week at the residence of Cook Vanbibber, on Union Ridge."

Margie Allen VanBibber died at Knox Township, Vinton County on 11 Apr 1921 and is buried at Putnam Cemetery. On Monday, 12 Jun 1922 Cook VanBibber was killed when the car he was driving was struck and demolished by a train. The front page of the Republican Tribune of 14 Jun 1922 reported: "On their way home from Columbus, Monday morning, Cook VanBibber, George E. Gibbs, and Aaron Harkins, all of Knox Township, in Mr. VanBibber's machine, stopped here for a short time and proceeded on their way home, and when on reaching the crossing of the Hocking Valley, on East Main Street, were struck by the north bound passenger train and instantly killed, The victims of the crossing tragedy Monday were all respected citizens of Knox Township, and all well known here."

Aaron Harkins was the father-in-law of Clarence H. VanBibber, George E. Gibbs was Cook VanBibber's first cousin (their mother's were sisters). Cook VanBibber's obituary states the accident occurred at 10:47 a.m. when he was "on his way home from Columbus where he had spent a few happy hours with his sons and daughter." He is buried at Putnam Cemetery.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan 1930 - GIBSON COUNTY, INDIANA (CENTER TOWNSHIP, FRANCISCO TOWN) ED. 26-40, SH. 3A, LN. 28, DWELLING/FAMILY (59/59).

VANBIBBER, JUDSON HEAD-M-W-62-M55- COAL MINE - OH-OH-OH
ETHEL WIFE-F-W-38-M31 IN-IN-IN
KENNEDY, RUBY SDAU-F-W-14-S IN-IN-IN
LOUISE SDAU-F-W-11-S IN-IN-IN
VANBIBBER, BETTY DAU -F-W- 4 9/12-S IN-OH-IN
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1930 - HOWARD COUNTY, INDIANA (CENTER TOWNSHIP, KOKOMO CITY) ED. 34-16, SH. 17A, LN. 18, DWELLING/FAMILY (412/422).

VANBIBBER, DAYTON HEAD-M-W-72-M60- FARMER - IN-OH-PA
ROSEALTHA WIFE-F-W-62-M49 IN-IN-IN
SEAGRAVES, OSBORNE SSON-M-W-27-S- TEACHER -IN-IN-IN
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1930 - HOWARD COUNTY, INDIANA (JACKSON TOWNSHIP) ED. 34-25, SH. 7A, LN. 3, DWELLING/FAMILY (161/161).

VANBIBBER, HOWARD R. HEAD-M-W-36-S- FARMER LIVE STOCK -IN-IN-IN
HAYWORTH, SARAH C. GMOTHER-F-W-80-W IN-KY-KY
LILLIE F. AUNT-F-W-64-S IN-OH-IN
HALL, FERD C. UNCLE-M-W-82-S IN-KY-KY
JOHN S. UNCLE-M-W-78-W IN-KY-KY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - HOWARD COUNTY, INDIANA (CENTER TOWNSHIP, KOKOMO CITY) ED. 34-14, SH. 10B, LN. 86, DWELLING/FAMILY (258/267).

VANBIBBER, LORA M. HEAD-M-W-45-M22- BAKERY SALESMAN - IN-OH-IN
MABLE WIFE-F-W-41-M18 IN-IN-OH
WILLIAM SON -M-W-18-S IN-IN-IN
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1930 - TIPPECANOE COUNTY, INDIANA (WABASH TOWNSHIP, WEST LAFAYETTE CITY) ED. 79-28, SH. 12B, LN. 59, DWELLING/FAMILY (302/359).

VANBIBBER, CHARLES D. HEAD-M-W-22-M21- NONE - IN-IN-IN
ARMINA C. WIFE-F-W-22-M21 IN-OH-IL
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1930 - TIPTON COUNTY, INDIANA (CICERO TOWNSHIP) ED. 80-4, SH. 1A, LN. 23, DWELLING/FAMILY (6/6).

VANBIBBER, AUSTIN E. HEAD-M-W-40-M27- FARMER - IN-IN-IN
GRACE P. WIFE-F-W-40-M27 IN-IN-IN
DONNA G. DAU -F-W- 1 9/12-S IN-IN-IN
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1930 - TIPTON COUNTY, INDIANA (PRAIRIE TOWNSHIP) ED. 80-13, SH. 7A, LN. 43, DWELLING/ FAMILY (168/171).

VANBIBBER, LORA E. HEAD-M-W-37-M19- FARMER - IN-IN-IN
CHLOE WIFE-F-W-36-M18 IN-IN-IN
LOWELL W. SON -M-W-16-S IN-IN-IN
HAROLD W. SON -M-W-13-S IN-IN-IN
CLARENCE L. GSON-M-W- 2 3/12-S IN-IN-IN
CROSSLEY, CARIE M. DAU -F-W-18-M18 IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (PIGEON TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-33, SH. 15B, LN. 85, DWELLING/FAMILY (360/390).

BARTON, BERT HEAD-M-W-55-M27- NIGHT WATCHMAN - IL-IL-IL
GERTRUDE WIFE-F-W-51-M23 IN-IN-IN
VANBIBBER, EARL[81] SIL -M-W-28-M20- PACKER -IN-IN-IN
DORIS DAU -F-W-26-M18 IN-IL-IN
JEAN GDAU-F-W- 6-S IN-IN-IN
LUCILLE GDAU-F-W- 2 6/12-S IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-48, SH. 15B, LN. 74, DWELLING/FAMILY (357/559).

VANBIBBER, ELZA HEAD-M-W-56-M25- LABORER - IN-PA-IN
HELEN WIFE-F-W-45-M16 IN-IN-IN
LEROY SON -M-W-26-S IN-IN-IN
DAVID SON -M-W-18-S WV-IN-IN
MYRTLE DAU -F-W-16-S PA-IN-IN
OWEN SON -M-W-10-S IN-IN-IN
LOUIS SON -M-W- 8-S IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP) ED. 82-48, SH. 28B, LN. 52, DWELLING/FAMILY (647/656).

VANBIBBER, FAY HEAD-M-W-20-M18- SHIP CLERK - IN-IN-IN
LENA WIFE-F-W-19-M17 IL-IL-IL
BOBBY SON -M-W- 1-S IL-IL-IL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (PIGEON TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-27, SH. 12B, LN. 72, DWELLING/FAMILY (273/277).

WHITTEN, ROSETTA HEAD-F-W-40-W- CIGAR FACTORY - IN-IN-VANBIBBER, GENEVA DAU -F-W-21-M18 IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-48, SH. 22A, LN. 34, DWELLING/FAMILY (500/505).

VANBIBBER, GEORGE HEAD-M-W-35-M24- FOREMAN BRICK YARD - KY-KY-KY
ETHEL WIFE-F-W-29-M18 IN-KY-IN
HELEN DAU -F-W-11-S IN-KY-IN
GEORGE JR. SON -M-W- 9-S IN-KY-IN
DOROTHY DAU -F-W- 8-S IN-KY-IN
ALVIN SON -M-W- 6-S IN-KY-IN
BETTY R. DAU -F-W- 1/12-S IN-KY-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82, SH. 24A, LN. 16, DWELLING/FAMILY (502/550).

VANBIBBER, GROVER HEAD-M-W-43-M22- FOREMAN BRICK YARD - KY-KY-KY
VINIE WIFE-F-W-45-M23 IL-IL-IL
ESTHER DAU -F-W- 6-S IN-KY-IL
LESTER SON -M-W- 6-S IN-KY-IL
CHARLES SON -M-W-20-S IN-KY-IL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP) ED. 82-48, SH. 27B, LN. 84, DWELLING/FAMILY (635/644).

VANBIBBER, JOHN HEAD-M-W-50-M21- BRICKYARD - IN-IN-IN
CARRIE WIFE-F-W-47-M17 IN-IN-IN
RAY SON -M-W-22-S- FURNITURE UPHOLSTERY - IN-IN-IN
MATILDA DAU -F-W-19-S IN-IN-IN
TONY SON -M-W-16-S IN-IN-IN
ANDY SON -M-W-12-S IN-IN-IN
THELMA DAU -F-W- 8-S IN-IN-IN
LILLIAN DAU -F-W- 6-S IN-IN-IN
JACKIE SON -M-W- 3-S IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-48, SH. 24A, LN. 48, DWELLING/FAMILY (549/557).

AUSTILL, ENOS HEAD-M-W-53-M21- POSTAL CLERK - IN-IN-IN
LENA WIFE-F-W-37-M19 IN-IN-IN
VANBIBBER, MARY DAU -F-W- 9-S IN-KY-IL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (PIGEON TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE TOWNSHIP), ED. 82-12, SH. 9A, LN. 31, DWELLING/FAMILY (192/247).

STEIN, THEORDORE HEAD-M-W-31-M27- V.P. INVESTMENT BANK- IN-KY-IN
ALICEN WIFE-F-W-29-26 IN-IN-IN
THEODORE W. SON -M-W- 2 6/12-S IN-IN-IN
VANBIBBER, THELMA SERVANT-F-W-20-S WV-IN-US
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (PIGEON TOWNSHIP, EVANSVILLE CITY) ED. 82-24, SH. 19A, LN. 16, DWELLING/FAMILY (412/412).

VANBIBBER, THOMAS HEAD-M-W-46-M26- FARMER - IN-IN-IN
LYDIA WIFE-F-W-45-M25- BROOM FACTORY - IL-IN-IN
VIOLET DAU -F-W-17-S IN-IN-IL
SMITH, JESSE C. LODGER-M-W-21-S- MOULDER IN-IL-KY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VANDERBURGH COUNTY, INDIANA (KNIGHT TOWNSHIP) ED. 82-48, SH. 15A, LN. 23, DWELLING/FAMILY (345/347).

KOLB, ANDREW HEAD-M-W-46-M24- FARMER - KY-GR-IN
CORA M. WIFE-F-W-43-M21 IN-IN-IN
LOUISE DAU -F-W-17-S IN-KY-IN
DOROTHY DAU -F-W-13-S IN-KY-IN
VANBIBBER, VAN BIL -M-W-48-S- FARM LABORER - IN-IN-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA (HARRISON TOWNSHIP, TERRE HAUTE CITY) ED. 84-40, SH. 8A, LN. 39, DWELLING/FAMILY (183/191).

VANBIBBER, EDWARD G. HEAD-M-W-49-M17- HOUSE PLASTERER - KY-KY-OH
ELIZABETH WIFE-F-W-49-M16 IN-MD-OH
EDNA DAU -F-W-26-S - STENOGRAPHER - IN-KY-IN
DAVID SON -M-W-23-S - HOUSE PLASTERER - IN-KY-IN
GEORGE SON -M-W-21-S IN-KY-IN
NADINE DAU -F-W-18-S - STENOGRAPHER - IN-KY-IN
VIRGINIA DAU -F-W-13-S IN-KY-IN
MARIAN DAU -F-W-10-S IN-KY-IN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1930 - VIGO COUNTY, INDIANA (HARRISON TOWNSHIP, CITY OF TERRA HAUTE) ED. 84-22, SH. 2B, LN. 53, DWELLING/FAMILY (39/40).

VANBIBBER, MINNIE HEAD-F-W-73-W19- NONE - OH-GR-GR
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Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Moses H. Van Bibber is a well known agriculturist of Huntsville township, Reno county, Kansas and the success which he has achieved is the merited reward of his own labor. He has worked his way steadily upward, overcoming all the difficulties and obstacles in his path by determined purpose, and to-day he is recognized as one of the most substantial citizens of the community, his labors having brought to him a handsome competence.

Mr. Van Bibber was born in Nicholas county, West Virginia. in the 7th of February, 1828, of which county his father, David C.R. Van Bibber, was also a native. The latter held the rank of captain in the militia. The grandfather of our subject, Mathias Van Bibber, was the first white male child born in a fort in Greenbrier county, West Virginia, and he held the rank of captain in the militia, while his father, John Van Bibber, served as a colonel therein.

About 1824 David C.R. Van Bibber, the father of our subject, wedded Jane Williams, who was born in Greenbrier county, West Virginia, December 12, 1804, and they became the parents of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, and eight of the number still survive. The mother passed away in Nicholas county, West Virginia, in 1872, and in 1889, from that county, her husband joined her in the spirit world, dying at the age of ninety years, his birth having occurred on the 16th of November, 1799.

Moses H. VanBibber, whose name introduces this review, enjoyed but limited educational advantages during his youth, but since putting aside his text books he has largely added to his knowledge by observation, reading and study, and has thus become a well informed man. In early life he learned surveying by himself, and for a number of years followed that occupation in his native state. On the 11th of May, 1874, he left his home in the south and with a team of horses and a covered wagon made the journey to the Sunflower state, arriving in Walnut township, Reno county, in the following June, and was at that time almost without means, He secured eighty acres of land, to which he afterward added another eighty-acre tract, but in 1884, he sold that place for fourteen hundred dollars and purchased the farm which he now owns. It then consisted of one hundred acres of railroad land, and the purchase price was five hundred and ninety dollars. The principal crop which he raises is corn and wheat, annually harvesting about two thousand bushels of corn, and during the year of 1901 his wheat crop yielded a return of two thousand one hundred and sixty bushels. His beautiful orchard an shade trees were planted by his own hands, and the many substantial and valuable improvements here seen stand as monuments to his thrift and ability.

In the Old Dominion, on the 14th of September, 1858, Mr. VanBibber was united in marriage to Joanna Pierson, a native of that commonwealth, and they had a family of four children, namely: David, who resides in Peoria, Illinois, and has two children: Franklin, who makes his home in West Virginia; Margaret Jane, wife of Henry Jones, of Peabody, Kansas, and they have five children; and Lizzie McClintosh, who died leaving one daughter. For his second wife Mr. Van Bibber chose Virginia Ann Holt, who was born in Charleston, West Virginia, and was married September 14, 1867, and by this union there were also four children: John, who is married and resides in Oklahoma; Ulysses Simpson Grant, who makes his home in Huntsville township, and has one daughter, and one son; Minnie, wife of O.C. Andel, by whom she has two daughters, and they reside with her parents; and Fred, at home. The mother of this family died on the 27th of October, 1892, at the age of forty-nine years. On questions of national importance Mr. Van Bibber casts his ballot in favor of Republican principles, but at local elections he votes for the men whom he regards as best qualified for public office. He has ever been a loyal and public spirited citizen, and during the Civil war he served for two years as a corporal in the state service. He is also a worthy member and active worker in the Missionary Baptist church. As a citizen he is progressive and loyal, as a business man straightforward and honorable, and as a friend he is faithful and consistent.

A Biographical History of Central Kansas, Vol. 1, 1902. Pages # 234 & 235.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber and Hannah Hoover
Mary Malinda VanBebber and Powell Hamilton Sharp
Elizabeth Sharp and James Monroe Youngblood

James and Elizabeth (Sharp) Youngblood had only been married a short time when they joined his family in their move from DeKalb County, Missouri to Arkansas. They settled on Long Creek, Carroll County, where their first four children were born. About 1855, they returned to DeKalb Co., Mo., where Elizabeth's family still lived, possibly because of her father's ailing health, and their fifth child was born there, three months before her father died in 1856.

According to a story told years ago by a descendant of the Sharp family, James and Elizabeth had another child, who died in a tragic accident occurring when a turkey feather duster caught fire in the fireplace. Elizabeth had gone to the spring for water at the time and was so traumatized by the incident, that she "went crazy." (Quite likely, the diagnosis today would be called a nervous breakdown). There does appear to be some basis to the story, as the 1860 census reflects James and the children back in the home of his parents in Carroll Co., Ark., while Elizabeth is still in DeKalb Co., Mo. with her mother and a widowed sister, and noted on the census as being "insane from grief." It is believed that she died not long after this and probably buried in the Sharp Cemetery, although there is no marker there, today, to confirm this.

There is evidence that James made visits to DeKalb County, Mo. and possibly moved back there when he left Arkansas about 1862. As the certainty of civil war drew closer, the safety and welfare of his children became a grave concern, for the advanced ages of his parents would preclude their caring for them, should he fall victim to the Confederate conscriptors now active in the area.

When James returned to Arkansas after the war was over, he brought with him a second wife and another son, who had been born in Iowa. Family tradition recalls only that this wife was an Indian women, who spoke no English, and it appears that she, too, died after the birth of their daughter, about 1868.

James remarried a third time, to a woman with several children from a previous marriage. Two of them were still living at home, one of whom later married James' son. They settled in Carrollton Township of Boone County, Ark. where James bought forty acres of land on January 1st, 1880. (SE1/4, SE1/2 Sect.5, T19N, R21W). This was located south of Burlington in a community known as Lick Branch, near a stream of the same name. James and Nancy sold this land a couple of years later, but evidently remained in the area. No headstone has been found for James, but he is likely buried in the Auman Cemetery.

Jeremiah Youngblood, A Genealogy, Compiled by: Dorothy Morris Quaife, Printed and Distributed by America Press, 18312 Ward Street, Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Pg. # 279.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
James Claiborne "Santiago" VanBibber and Anestaria Flores
~Richard "Ricardo" VanBibber and Marina Nieto~
~James "Santiago" VanBibber and Elvira Recio~
Louis Eliud VanBibber and Angelica Garza


Louis Eliud Van Bibber born December 8, 1921 in Baytown, Harris County, Texas. He died on November 22, 2002. He married Angelica Garza born May 26, 1927 and died on May 10, 2001. His Father was James "Santiago" Van Bibber.

James Claiborne Van Bibber who was born in February of 1897 in Mexico and died September 27, 1947 in Mexico. James spent his life living between Mexico and the state of Texas. While living in Texas he went by the name of James. This is evident as he was recorded as James on the 1930 census living in Houston, Harris County, Texas. While living in Mexico he went by the name of Santiago which is the Mexican/Spanish version for James. My grandfather married Elvira Recio who was born on January 30, 1888 in Mexico and died in 1984 in Houston. To this marriage were three sons, Louis, David and Robert. On the 1930 census it states James was born in Mexico along with his parents.

James C. can be located on the 1850 census of Webb County, Texas. This county is right along the Mexican border and is where the present day town of Laredo is. He is living in the home of F. R. Taylor. James is listed as being 33 years old, born in Tennessee and his occupation is listed as clerk. The name is spelled "Van Bibber." This census can be viewed on the Van Bibber website under the 1850 census records. By the way, he is the only Van Bibber listed on the 1850 census for the state of Texas. There was a John Van Bibber who lived in Victoria, Texas, but he went to California for the gold rush. He eventually returned and this is where he died. John and James were 2nd cousins once removed and may very well have known each other even though one family was from Greenup County, Kentucky while the other was from Claiborne County, Tennessee. Eventually James C. would return to Tennessee as he enlisted in the US Army on June 15, 1846 at Memphis to serve for a term of 12 months. The Mexican War was from April 25, 1846, when both forces clashed, until the peace treaty was signed on February 2, 1848. This means James C. did serve in the US Army during the Mexican War. As mentioned above, James C. is living in Webb County, Texas in 1850. In 1854 he authorizes John Van Bibber to collect all or any money that may be due to him within the state of Texas. The next information we have on James C. is where he was to receive $50.00 from the Last Will and Testament of his father, Isaac Van Bebber, Esq., that was written on January 31, 1859 in Claiborne County, Tennessee.
When the 1860 census was recorded for the state of Texas, James C. was not listed. I cannot find any additional information on him from the Texas records. What is very possible, after John was authorized to collect for him in 1854, James traveled over into Mexico to live. While there, he used the name Santiago and this is where he married Anestaria Flores, and lived the remainder of his life. A son, Richard "Ricardo" Van Bibber was born about 1861 in Mexico. With his father being an American citizen, and even though Richard was born in Mexico, it probably gave him the flexibility to move back and forth between the two countries which he did. Richard married Marina Nieto and they would have the son James, named after the grandfather. James also lived between the two countries and went by the name Santiago while in Mexico.

His Father was Richard Van Bibber. Once again, he spent time between Mexico and Texas. While in Mexico he went by the name "Ricardo." While in Texas he went by "Richard." His death certificate which states he died on January 24, 1926 in Houston, Texas. It states he was 65 years old and born in Mexico. Being 65 years old at his death, this puts him born about 1861. The death certificate states his parents were Santiago Van Bibber and Anestaria Flores, both being born in Mexico. Richard was married to Marina Nieto.
NOTE: ON ROOTSWEB MEXICO ARCHIVES I FOUND THIS MESSAGE:
My grandfather Santiago Van Bibber lived in Musquiz, in the State of Choa-whe-la (phoenitic pronounciation), Mexico. He is buried there. He married my grandmother Elvita Rescio, who is buried here in Houston, as she lived out her life in our home.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally, Jr.
VanBibber Donnally and Mary Boyd Waggoner
William Boyd Donnally and Sally Ashton Cotton


WILLIAM B. DONNALLY, a well known business man of Charleston, where he is engaged in the transfer and freighting business, and is also a dealer in grain and feed stuffs, was born in the Salines, on Kanawha river, this county, in 1851, a son of Van Bibber and Mary B. (Waggoner) Donnally.

He is a great grandson of Col. Andrew Donnally, born in the north of Ireland, who came to this country about the middle of the eighteenth century, at which time there was a large Scotch-Irish emigration to the Valley of Virginia. This early ancestor soon became a prominent man in his locality, serving as high sheriff and county lieutenant, or military commander of Botetourt County. This office of county lieutenant, or military commander, was a very important one at that day and was borrowed from the Mother Country, where it was usually held by a person of rank. It carried with it also the title of colonel. Col. Donnally may have been one of the officers of Botetourt County at its formation in 1770. The fort called Donnally's was built in 1771 in that county. The colonel or county lieutenant was the person to communicate with the governor and the secretary of the colony, commanded the militia and presided at the county courts. He was appointed by the governor with the advice of the council and was generally the most prominent citizen. The office was held during good behavior. Col. Donnally was subsequently made county lieutenant of Greenbrier County and continued in that office under Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, the two first governors of Virginia. There is a story current in the family that he was with Washington's army at Valley Forge during the severe winter of 1777-78 and participated in the awful suffering of that period, but, however this may be, there is no further evidence of his being again with the Continental army.
About this time, however, he had his experience of Indian warfare. The murder of the famous Chief Cornstalk by the whites, or rather, by some white men, for it was an act denounced by the best men on the frontier, had greatly exasperated the Indians and they retaliated viciously on the unprotected
settlers. In the spring of 1778 they attempted to surprise and capture Fort Randolph at Point Pleasant, but failing in that, they turned their attention to Fort Donnally. The occupants of the fort were apprised of their danger in time by two men from Fort Randolph, who succeeded in eluding the savages. Col. Donnally, who had been absent, returned to the fort at night just as the enemy were investing it, but succeeded in entering it without being noticed. The attack which followed was disastrous to the Indians, who departed after suffering considerable loss. Four white men in all were killed, two while on their way to the fort. Among the defenders, Col. Donnally's daughter Catherine took a conspicuous part, though then but a young girl of twelve years. Another daughter, Katie, helped to mould the pewter plate and spoons into bullets and poured hot water through the puncheons on the heads of the savages. With perhaps one exception, this was the last raid of the Indians to the Greenbrier.
Says a writer in the West Virginia Historical Magazine (Quarterly) for July, 1901: The responsibilities of Col. Donnally's position were very great and the work heavy. He felt personally accountable for the lives of the people in the wilds of the Greenbrier, Meadow Creek and Kanawha's rivers and their tributaries. The duties of his office called him constantly from home, but it seems that he was ever at hand when emergencies arose. That he was a man of great executive ability, history proves. Stories of his personal courage and great physical strength are too well known to admit of a doubt and his racy repartees became proverbial. . . . He had only 550 men in the militia at his disposal, for the defense of this western frontier. Governor Jefferson was now asking for some of these men to be sent to General George Rogers Clark to aid in his expedition against his Indians of the West. The Assembly also required of him more men for the Continental army * * * The public credit was at so low an ebb that no one would advance money. Ammunition was scarce. The militia must depend upon the corn tax levied on the settlers. Yet these brave men struggled on and fought for their country.

Col. Donnally resigned his commission as military commander on September 19, 1781. It was not accepted evidently, as he writes officially to Gov. Patrick Henry in 1785. Col. Donnally was one of the trustees of Lewisburg at its establishment in 1782. He did not come to reside on the Kanawha until after the battle at Fort Donnally. He went directly to the mouth of the river and lived just above the present town of Point Pleasant for a year or more. He was one of those who denounced the murderers of Cornstalk, and on one occasion meeting with a man who boasted that he had fired the fatal shot that brought such desolation to the frontier settlements, he knocked him senseless with a stanchion, so that when he recovered he hastened away from the locality and was never more heard of.

Colonel Donnally owned many negroes, one of whom, Dick Pointer, distinguished himself in the fight at Donnally's Fort in 1778. A son of the latter was taken prisoner by the Indians in 1790 and was made a chief by them. He subsequently aided the Americans in the war of 1812. Col. Donnally lived a short time at the mouth of the Elk after leaving Point Pleasant. Kanawha county was formed in 1789 and he was chosen the first representative. The population at this time however, was so sparse that but thirteen votes were cast, although the polls were open for three days. He again served his county as representative in 1803. From the mouth of the Elk he moved to his permanent home, about five miles above Charleston, on the south side of the Kanawha, where he lived in comfort and prosperity for many years. He died about 1825. He had one brother, whose descendants reside in New Jersey and Ohio. Of his own immediate family he had several daughters, who are represented by the Slaughters, Hendersons and Wilsons, now living here and elsewhere, and are prominently married and represented in the different professions and trades.

There has scarcely been a period in the last century that this state, county or town was not represented by one of Col. Donnally's descendants, either directly or indirectly through marriage. The renowned Daniel Boone was neighbor for years to Colonel Donnally, residing on his place up to the time that he left for Spanish Missouri in 1799. Daniel's son, Jesse Boone, who was Colonel Donnally's brother-in-law, resided in his father's home until 1816, when he also went West. Colonel Donnally was one of the early salt manufacturers of the county, this industry being an important one at that time on the frontier, as salt, while one of the most necessary articles for the pioneer, was also one of the most difficult ones to obtain, except in the immediate vicinity of salt springs, where the salt was manufactured by the tedious process of boiling and evaporation. The Colonel and his wife were Presbyterians in religious faith. They died when between 60 and 70 years of age and were buried in what is now the old family plot, where many of their descendants have found a last resting place.

They had a family of four or five children. Andrew Donnally (2d), son of the foregoing and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born in Fort Donnally, ten miles west of Lewisburg and, like his father, in turn became a prominent man in his community, owning about 100,000 acres of land together with 150 slaves. Together with a Mr. Ruffner, as the firm of Ruffner and Donnally, he owned and controlled the entire salt output of the county, this being the first commercial monopoly known in the history of the county. At one time he lived in Charleston, where he owned valuable property, though he and his wife resided for nearly half a century on the old homestead, which they improved and greatly enlarged in area. A Whig in politics, he was twice high sheriff, was clerk of the courts, and magistrate and a representative in the Virginia legislature. His death took place in 1849 when he was about 70 years of age. In 1802 he had married Marjory, daughter of Captain John Van Bibber, and they had six sons that arrived at maturity, besides two daughters. The sons married into prominent old families of the valley, and all were engaged conspicuously in business interests. The two daughters married respectively, Henry Fry, great grandson of Col. Joshua Fry, who commanded the Colonial army in 1754, and who had been prominent in Virginia history for thirty years or more, and Col. John Lewis, grandson of Gen. Andrew Lewis, the Indian fighter, and Colonial and also Revolutionary officer of renown. The members of this family, which numbered nine children in all, are all now deceased. Van Bibber Donnally, father of the subject of this sketch, was the eldest child of his parents. He was born in Charleston, W. Va., in 1809 and grew to manhood in Kanawha county. His literary education was obtained in a college at Athens, Ohio. Like his father, he engaged in the salt business and continued in it most of the time until the breaking out of the Civil War. He was an active member of the Democratic party and in religion a Presbyterian. His death took place in Buffalo, W. Va., when he had attained the age of 72 years. He had married in Mason county, W. Va., Mary B. Waggoner, a native of that county. She was born a little later than her husband and died later, at the age of 75 years. Like him she was a Presbyterian in religion. Their family numbered ten children, of whom there are five still living, one daughter being a widow and two of the children being yet unmarried. William B. Donnally, the date and place of whose nativity has been already given, was educated in the public schools, but endowed with a good brain and an energetic nature he has since largely increased his mental equipment in the domain of practical knowledge. Coming to Charleston in 1885 he established here the freighting and transfer business, of which he is now the head, and which has since grown to large proportions, giving employment to 25 people. A Democratic in politics, he was nominated for the office of sheriff and twice for county clerk, but this being a strong Republican district, he was defeated. Mr. Donnally was married in this county to Sallie Ashton Cotton, who was born in Charleston in 1858, daughter of Dr. John T. and Sarah (Fitzhugh) Cotton, one time residents in Ohio, but who were for many years prominent in the business and social life of Charleston, Va. Of this union there have been ten children, of whom two died young. The living are as follows: Sarah is the wife of L. L. Sheets and has one son, Donnally. John C., who was educated at Phillips-Exeter Academy, graduating also from the law department of the University of Virginia in the class of 1903. Frank Woodman died at the age of 9 years. William B. Jr., who is a well educated young man, is associated with his father in business. The other children, Henry Fitzhugh, Van Bibber, Dorothy, Fitzhugh and Robert, are attending the high school. Mr. Donnally adheres to the religious faith of his ancestors, being a Presbyterian, while Mrs. Donnally is an Episcopalian.

History of Charleston and Kanawha County, West Virginia and Representative Citizens -- W.S. Laidley -- Richmond Arnold Publishing Co., Chicago, ILL. -- 1911 -- p. 387-390
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
Robert VanBeber and Margaret Jane Susong
Mary VanBeber and Henry C. Painter
Edgar Frank Painter

THOMPSON CHAPEL CEMETERY
Located: 2 miles South of New Tazewell, on old 25-E.

Henry Painter -- b. Nov. 26, 1867 - d. Sept. 11, 1950
Mary V. Painter -- b. Apr. 20, 1877 - d. Jan. 4, 1948
Edgar Frank Painter -- b. Jan. 11, 1895 - d. July 22, 1930

Cemeteries of Claiborne County Tennessee, by Paul Johnson -- Page #210.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
James VanBibber and Naomi Barton White
Elizabeth Naomi VanBibber and William King Boal
Eliza VanBibber Boal and Aaron Morrison Orr
Morrison Boal Orr

Morrison Boal Orr, a director of the Orr Felt & Blanket Company at Piqua, and one of that city's energetic and progressive business men, was born at Piqua, March 11, 1894, a son of Aaron Morrison and Eliza VanBibber (Boal) Orr. The late A. Morrison Orr was one of Piqua's most successful business men. He was born September 7, 1856, in Darke county, Ohio, a son of Gen. W. P. Orr, and was educated there and at Piqua. His first business venture was in the grain and linseed oil line in partnership with a Mr. Leonard, but the name of the firm was later changed to the W. P. Orr Linseed Oil Company. This concern subsequently sold out to the American Linseed Oil Company, and when this change was effected Mr. Orr remained with the new concern as manager of the sales department, at Cincinnati. He severed his connection with that business in February, 1897, at which time he became interested in a paper mill and stove works, and in 1900 bought out the F. Gray Felt & Blanket Company and founded the Orr Felt & Blanket Company, which has become one of Miami county's largest manufacturing concerns and a history of which will be found in the industrial part of this work. Mr. Orr was a devout member of the Presbyterian church, an Elk and a member of the Piqua Business Men's Club. In his death his community lost a capable, greatly respected and public-spirited man. Mr. Orr married Eliza Van Bibber Boal, a native of Kentucky, and they became the parents of two children: Martha Louise, the wife of W. R. Casparis of Columbus, and Morrison Boal. Morrison Boal Orr was educated in the Piqua public schools and after his graduation from high school, in 1912, pursued a course at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H. Graduated in 1914, he entered Yale University, as a student of Sheffield Scientific School, and was attending his studies there when the United States entered the World war. He enlisted in the navy at Newport, R. I., in April, 1917, and in June of the same year received his commission as ensign. Subsequently he served on board the United States Ship Chattanooga from June until December, when he was transferred to the United States Destroyer McDonough, serving thereon until August, 1918, and being then transferred to the United States Naval Railway Battery. He received his honorable discharge March 1, 1919, and returned to Piqua, where he became a director of the Orr Felt & Blanket Company. Mr. Orr is well thought of in business circles and is highly popular with all who know him. He holds membership in the Masons and Elks and has a number of civic and social connections of importance.

Biographical Sketches and Stories of Miami County Ohio People, places, and things
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan James VanBibber and Sarah Margaret Bradburn
Charles Wesley VanBibber
Inscription:
FATHER
CHARLES W. VANBIBBER
Aug, 31, 1888
Aug, 22, 1946

James VanBibber and Sarah Margaret Bradburn
Charles Wesley VanBibber and Emma Lee Lowder
Inscription:
EMMA L.
WIFE OF C.W. VANBIBBER
Apr. 22, 1874
Oct. 10, 191
Location: Corn-Adkins Cemetery, Greenup County, Kentucky
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Elizabeth VanBibber and Ezra Jeffords
Joseph VanBibber Jeffords and Anna Amelia Crain
Charles Aaron VanBibber and Victoria "Dora" Ehret
Charles Joseph Jeffords

When the family were sitting at the evening meal at the home of Mrs. and Mrs. Charles Jeffords, 633 Sixth street, Friday evening, Mrs. Jeffords suddenly remarked that she knew that her son Charles was dead. Before any one could reply the door bell sounded and a telegram was received from Washington stating that Pvt. Charles Joseph Jeffords had been officially reported killed in action, Nov. 1, 1918 while fighting for his flag in France.

Last Monday night, a sister of Pvt. Jeffords, Mrs. C. W. Russell had a dream. She thought that both her brothers had been brought home dead and were in caskets side by side in the front room of the home.

Pvt. Jeffords was born in Portsmouth, May 22, 1893 and had been an employee of the Excelsior Shoe Plant for the past fourteen (sic.) years. At the time of his departure for Camp Sherman, July 25, 1918 he was assistant credit man at the plant. Jeffords was given a short period of training at

Camp Sherman and sent to Camp Mills where he remained two weeks. Early in September he sailed overseas with Co., K, 336 Regiment.

He leaves his parents, three sisters, Mrs. Reed Rowe, Baird avenue, Mrs. C. W. Russell, and Alma Jeffords, Sixth Street; one brother Corporal Fred Jeffords who is in training at Wilbur Wright Field, Dayton, to mourn the death of a gallant hero.

Pvt. Jeffords was a member of St. Mary's church and a faithful member of the Knights of Columbus and Knights of St. George.

Pvt. Anthony Billian who was officially reported as killed in action on Nov. 2, 1918 and Pvt. Jeffords who were life long friends and boon companions fought in their first battle together. The boys left for Camp Sherman one month apart but went to France on the same vessel. According to a letter recently written by Pvt. Jeffords, he stated that if Billian was killed he wanted to be killed also as they wanted to return together or not at all.

Both young men were well known in the city and their many friends will be grieved to learn of their deaths although they died for their county and for a noble cause.

Portsmouth Daily Times -- Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio -- November 30, 1918 -- Saturday.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Frances VanBibber and Cyrenius Cox
James Estill Cox, Sr. and Mary T. Harris
James Estill Cox, Jr. and Minnie B. Rush

COX, Jennie S. dau of James and Mary T. 5y, 13d -- d. 11 Dec 1883
COX, Mary T. 1847 - 1933
COX, James E. 1826 - 1908
COX, Minnie Rush 1874 - 1950
COX, James E. 1872 - 1908*
COX, William Ewing 1869 - 1954 (Son of James E. Cox, Sr. and Mary T. Harris)
COX, Blanche A. 1872 - 1954 (Second wife of William Ewing Cox)
Notes: Comments in parentheses are my own.
This death date for James E. Cox, Jr. is incorrect as he was still living in 1930.
Mt. Mora Cemetery, Buchanan County, St. Joseph, Missouri -- By Margaret McDaniel and Martha McDaniel Thompson -- 1978 -- Page #39.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Levicy VanBebber and John Liford
William Prior Liford and Sara Elizabeth Pugh
James Robert Liford and Alice Spicer
Fern May Liford and James Edward Baker
John Dewey Baker

S/Sgt. John D. Baker, brother of Miss Ida Baker and Mrs. Mary E. Scott, both of 1014 English Avenue, was killed November 21st, 1944 in New Guinea. He was on his second mission then.

A top turret gunner on a B-29 Bomber, he previously served in North Africa, Sicily, and Italy, and had flown more than seventy missions there. In his column last March, Ernie Pyle mentioned S/Sgt. Baker as having flown more missions than any other member of his squadron.

The young airman enlisted in the Air Corps three years ago and had been in the South Pacific since September. He received the purple heart for wounds received in Italy last spring, and also held the air medal with three oak leaf clusters along with the distinguished flying cross. He was home last May (1944) just before the death of his mother (Fern May Liford).

The sergeant was 18 (he lied about his age and enlisted in the Air Corps at the age of 15) and attended Arsenal Technical High School (in Indianapolis, Indiana).

Survivors, besides Miss (Ida) Baker and Mrs. (Mary) Scott include another sister, Mrs. Catherine (Baker) Alexander, Tacoma, Washington, his father, James E. Baker, Evansville (Indiana), and three brothers, Walter L. (Baker) of Evansville (Indiana), Earl (Baker) of Martinsville (Indiana), and William Baker, serving in France (with the U.S. Army).

Indianapolis Star -- Indianapolis, Indiana
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Calvin VanBebber and Barthena A. VanBebber
Mary Ellen VanBebber and Thomas O'Rourke

PARK HILL CEMETERY --VANCOUVER, CLARK COUNTY, WASHINGTON

C 165-2 Mary Ellen O'Rourke, 1868 - 1967
Born: MO
Died: 8 Mar 1867
Age: 98 yrs 7 mos of old age
Interred (burial date): 10 Mar 1967
Lot Owner: Irene Williams
Funeral Director: Hamilton-Mylan Funeral Home
Same Stone: Thomas O'Rourke

C 165-1 Thomas O'Rourke, 1866 - 1948
Born: CA
Died: 12 Nov 1948
Age: 81 yrs 10 mos of senility
Interred (burial date): 16 Nov 1948
Lot Owner: I. Williams
Funeral Director: Hamilton Funeral Home
Same Stone: Mary Ellen O'Rourke
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro

Son William:

Nothing very interesting transpired since you left us. We have had a long cold winter since Febry commenced, say till 20th inst, more so than common. But we have weathered through so far as yet.
No deaths among the friends as yet occurred. Myself has bad cold and cough ever since first of December with but little intermission so that I almost despired of seeing grasse rise. But through the tender mercies of kind and benevolent Providence (whose goodmess and mercy has followed me all the days of my life) I am yet on pleading ground and last week was able to ride to Old Town Creek to a very comfortable meeting at that place. Nearly all the people in the vicinity are serious and apparently for the better. Many have joined the church, among whom are your Aunt Jerusha Lee, Thos. Norville with many others. Uncle Tommy and Gibson are expected to follow. Sister Jerusha, Walter and Polly Moss I think are among the seekers. It would do my poor heart good and make it rejoice if I could hear the good news of all my children embracing the religion of Jesus and submit to the mild septer of King Immanuel. My son, pray don't neglect the one thing needful, tis of the utmost importance--good in time, good in eternity, good to live on, good to die on. This world with all its allurements is not to be put in comparison with a saving interest in the Redeemer's righteousness and I assure my propensities and desires after worldy possessions has very much abated by considersing their uncertain and unsatisfying nature and do pray that my last days may be my best days and that I may pass through earth with my heart and hopes fixed on Heaven. I do most heartily covet and try to pray you and all yours may so improve the precious seed time, that so Eternity may yield a joyful harvest to you and your little ones. But tis hope against hope. When I consider your dear little children will take their first impressions of their infantile minds and are sure to get a set and bias (which you may observe in nearly all families the case from the mother that tis almost impossible to eradicate or remove.) But I hope your philisophical mind will spare the pains to cultivate sound and good principles clear of affectation and duplicity for I do expect your children are as near to you as mine are to me, which are like the apple of the eye--and which I have been uncommonly blessed with and whom I attribute took their set from the mother and but small assistance from me.

It makes me feel grateful to hear it often remarked that such a family of daughters was scarcely known to be raised by one mother, and my sons no complaint only that they were not business men as their sisters are. My dear little Sallie Ann is a very promising daughter and you may be sure its mother spares no pains to install in the tender mind principles of virtue and domestic habits.

We live comfortable and happy as can be. No jars or contradictions is allowed and my dear little Dorcas is so kind, affectionate and attentive that if she thought one of her eyes would add anything to my comfort it would not be withheld. So that our enjoyments are sweet and contentment is ever our guest so far as earthly things concern us. This day preparing for a four day meeting at Barbourville which commences this day. A number of preaching brethren is expected. I must be off shortly or be too date for first day.

Son James is gone at this time to catch fish at B. Herndon's, mouth of Laurel. Ben has got his saw and grist mill at work, promises himself great incomes. Has a town laid out and lots are to be sold in the town of (?). Two steamboats are to navigate shortly. Sam Hogan has been to look out a country to move to since Feby last. Took with him 3 or 4 negroes to sell. Has sold his farm but Charity is still living in it yet. All well. This trip I expect will finish Hogan's building castle. We look for him middle of next month or last. Bob Gibson doing right well. Got near a hundred steers. Many of them will be for sale next fall. Sue Ruth Snaugger for saying he stole one of her yearlings. John Wallen, the same or worse, drinking all he can get. He, I am told, is sure of the recovery of John Hardy's place. Two better titles than Hardy's. He orders his wife off every few days when drinking. I don't know but she will have to leave him for she at times in danger of her life and is the only support of him and James Wallen. Uncle Daniel much the same. Moss, they tell me, is likely to get through his difficulties, don't drink any hardly of the accursed poison. I hope my son, you have seen the evil and abandoned it. L. Johnson and James still doing small business at their place. Olivia has another son. John Word about the same. I don't know how Burch is doing, still a little I believe. Your son Milton crops with Geo. Fletcher I am told. John
Hendrickson bought old Feltcher's place. John Miller lives on it this summer. Your sister Jane keeps about as usual. Rides to meetings and where she pleases, is right good manager.

Should like to hear your prospects and how well you like MO. I feel very much interested in your welfare, not only in time but Eternity and hope you may be pleased with the country and a settlement advantageous for yourself and family was my particular reason for being willing for your moving so far
from us while I was living whom I very much doubt will you hardly ever see me more in time for I fail and get weaker very year and my change must shortly come.

I want you continue your good name. Never give way to intoxicating drink. I am fraidest of any temporal calamity. How many it has ruined and never fails to destroy when made to free with. Not a drop enters my lips. Keep clear of debt which is hard for you to do except a firm and determined
resolution. You have so large and expensive family proud with all and but little help to you soon as they get of size to do you any service they must depart. I was always averse to being in debt. I was surprised when James came home and told me the money you had to bear your expenses in moving and posted him off next morning with what we could raise for you for I had thought you surely had four or five hundred dollars to take with you and truly out of humor to think to your buying so many horses which I thought
bad policy. When I moved to Tennessee, one wagon and four horses was all I was able to get and had more to move with than I expect you had to carry, but I hope if you don't manage pretty well the plantation you sold Word will slip through your fingers and you will hardly know how or what became of it. Your corn I am told did not measure as well as was expected. James got none. Burch got none and I don't know how Skeltoin came out. I can hardly write inteligible, but remain

Your loving father,
James Renfro

NOTES: James Renfro died just three months after writing this letter July 29, 1835. Someone brought him a rock containing a nugget of silver which had been found somewhere on his land. He mounted his horse, took a young black boy with him and set off during a thunderstorm to search for Swift's silver mine. The family legend is that he, the boy, and the horse were all killed by a falling branch of a tree but it seems most likely that lightning struck the tree and/or James, the boy and the horse. All three were killed. James was buried in the family plot where his house stood at Cumberland Ford, later the site of the Gibson house. A small park is now at that site with a marker for the site of Cumberland Ford. James, Charity and Mary (Polly), their daughter, all had tombstones at that site. They were later removed to the Pineville Cemetery by Ray B. Moss, where they stand today, with the addition of modern markers with the same information as the old markers. In the small park at Cumberland Ford, there are numerous sandstone markers which are for the slaves, none of which have any inscriptions. The park was donated to the city of Pineville by Valerie Saunders, a descendant of the Gibsons.

William Renfro was born 4/9/1788 and married on 11/20/1806 to Nancy VanBibber. Jerucia Renfro was daughter of James and Charity (Huff) Renfro. She married John Wallen. The other Jerusha, referred to in letter as Aunt Jerusha Lee was a Huff--related to Charity Huff. The Dorcas referred to was wife #2.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Gabriel VanBebber and Barbara Carlock
Alexander VanBebber and Louisa Lee

Inscription:

LOUISA LEE
Wife of
ALEXANDER
VAN BEBBER
MAR. 24, 1829
NOV. 24, 1914

Location: Guy Cemetery, St. Elmo, Fayette County, Illinois
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan FAMILY OF JOHN JUMP, JR. AND SARAH JANE ZUMWALT:

John2 Jump, Jr. (John1) was born November 10, 1831 in St. Louis Co., MO, and died September 02, 1901 in Goodson, Polk Co., MO. He married Sarah Jane Zumwalt May 13, 1858 in Polk Co., MO, daughter of Henry Zumwalt and Jemima Boone. She was born December 25, 1841 in Green Co., MO, and died July 04, 1916 in Polk Co., MO.
Children of John Jump and Sarah Zumwalt are:

2 i. Jemima3 Jump, born July 22, 1859 in MO; died March 17, 1938 in Polk Co., MO. She married (1) John Andrew Rentfrow October 26, 1876 in Polk Co., MO; born April 1854 in MO. She married (2) R. A. Smelser December 15, 1908. She married (3) Mr. Richardson.

3 ii. John Henry Jump, born January 12, 1861 in MO; died July 12, 1927 in Polk Co., MO. He married Narcissa Martin in Polk Co., MO; born 1870 in MO.

4 iii. William S. Jump, born 1863 in MO. He married Mary J.; born April 1867 in MO.

5 iv. Nancy A. Jump, born July 16, 1867 in Hickory Co., MO; died July 23, 1942 in Fairfax, Osage Co., OK. She married (1) William M. Hutcheson December 22, 1889 in Polk Co., MO; born October 04, 1869 in Polk Co., MO; died January 29, 1903 in Polk Co., MO. She married (2) George Newton McMahan June 12, 1904 in Polk Co., MO; born 1843 in MO; died April 13, 1908 in Niengie, Webster Co., MO. She married (3) C. J. Ashworth November 11, 1908.

6 v. Robert T. Jump, born February 1870 in MO. He married Lizzie Barker Abt. 1894 in Polk Co., MO; born July 1873 in KS.

7 vi. Lucretia Jane Jump, born December 14, 1872 in MO; died 1961 in Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO. She married John Franklin Hawkins Abt. 1890 in Polk Co., MO; born March 07, 1865 in MO; died October 10, 1939.

8 vii. Sarah Catherine Jump, born June 29, 1877 in MO; died March 16, 1954. She married (1) Mr. Sawyers. She married (2) William Thair Tirey September 30, 1894 in Polk Co., MO; born March 1872 in MO.

9 viii. Martha Ellen Jump, born 1878 in MO. She married Isaac Lem Farmer Abt. 1899; born 1875 in MO.

10 ix. Mary F. Jump, born April 20, 1878 in MO; died October 27, 1901 in MO.

11 x. Dorothy Lucinda Jump, born February 25, 1883 in MO; died May 22, 1976. She married William Jesse Hawkins November 20, 1898 in Polk Co., MO; born October 02, 1875 in Goodson, MO; died December 12, 1964 in Marshall, Saline Co., MO.

12 xi. Iva Mae Jump, born December 01, 1885 in MO; died January 23, 1977 in Polk Co., MO. She married (1) John Joseph Searls January 10, 1904 in Polk Co., MO; born July 20, 1882 in MO; died October 04, 1917. She married (2) Easley E. Farmer Aft. 1918; born 1885 in MO; died October 24, 1974 in Polk Co., MO. She married (3) Ernest F. Bugh.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Solomon H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
William VanBibber and Frances Ann Thoroughman
Thomas Jefferson VanBibber and Rebecca Christopher
Price VanBibber and Susie Clifton

Van Bibber, Price 3/18/1890 - 11/06/1961
Susie C. 2/29/1908 - 10/23/1963

The Cemeteries of Adair County, Missouri, 1980 -- Adair County Historical Society -- Page #125.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Gabriel VanBebber and Barbara Carlock
Granville VanBebber and Mary Lee
Emily Jane VanBebber and John Randolph Waters

Sons: John Loyd Waters
George F. Waters

WATERS, George F., 1876 - 1918, s. of J.R. & E.J.
John L., 1888 - 1913, s. of J.R. & E.J.
Emily J., 1854 - 1930
John R., 1837 - 1929, Co F 29th Ill. Inf.
Tombstone Inscriptions of Jasper County, Missouri, Volume IV -- Compiled by Colleen Belk -- Copyright 1972 -- Page 91.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Greenup, Ky., Nov. 8. - Mr. and Mrs. Ferris Van Bibber of Greenup were notified last night that their son Carl Van Bibber, 24, had died at 3:55 o'clock yesterday afternoon in Honolulu, H. I. Death was due to pneumonia which developed after a spinal injury suffered while he was playing football Friday.
Mr. Van Bibber, a private, was stationed in Hawaii with the U. S. Army.
He was a member of the 1934 class at Greenup high school and formerly was a star halfback and track athlete at Greenup high.
The body will be brought here for burial.
He leaves his parents and two brothers, Charles, who is a member of the U. S. aviation corps in Hawaii, and Homer, who is stationed at Fort Thomas, Ky.
Ashland Daily Independent -- Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky -- November 8, 1938 -- Tuesday.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Rhoda VanBibber and John Passmore Tanner
Inscription:
JOHN P. TANNER
BORN AUG. 20, 1800.
DIED AP'L 22, 1881.

RHODA VAN BIBBER
WIFE OF JOHN P. TANNER
BORN MAR. 15, 1808
DIED AP'L 7, 1881.

Location: Van Bibber Cemetery, (Little Sandy River) Greenup County, Kentucky
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
William VanBebber

Inscription:

WM VANBEBBER
DIED
Dec. 13, 1870
AGED
60 Y. 11M. 12D.
Location: Van Bebber Cemetery, Ray County, Missouri
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BITS & PIECES.........

Liberty, MO., June 28 --
Noah Vanbibber, 23 years old, of Smithville, Mo., was sentenced to two years in the state penitentiary by Judge Ralph Hughes in circuit court here today on a charge of stealing motor car parts from J. E. Johnson, a farmer near Smithville, February 27, 1927. Fred Z. Courtney, Clay county prosecutor, ran his total of successful criminal prosecutions to seventeen by gaining the conviction of Vanbibber.
The Chillicothe Constitution Tribune -- Chillicothe, Livingston County, Missouri -- June 28, 1927.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Sarah Wilcoxin Boone and Winfield Scott Mullen Wright
Mahala Olive Wright and James C. Robertson


Robertson, James C. - Wright, Olive M. married Nov. 9, 1875 - Book E, Page #62.

Sonoma County Marriages 1847 - 1902, Sonoma County Genealogical Society, Inc., Santa Rosa, California, March 1990, First Edition. Page #103.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Nancy VanBebber and Robert Howard
Isaac Howard and Sarah Moore
William P. Howard and Malinda Haston
Joseph Haston Howard and Samantha J. Campbell
William Isaac Howard

Louvenia Cemetery, Yell County, Arkansas

Howard, Wm. Isaac, son of J. H. and S. J. -- b. 6 Oct 1874 d. 24 Aug 1875

Cemeteries of Yell County, Arkansas Volume 2, by Doyle Traxler and Mary V. Humphrey, 1980, Page #29.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber and Marguery Bounds
John Jesse VanBibber and Rachel Greenlee
Elizabeth VanBibber and Joseph Smith
VanBibber Smith and Louisa Hart
Sarah Jane Smith and Nelson Everett Slocum
Earl Slocum

Kirby Cemetery

Slocum, Earl son of N. E. & S. J. Slocum, Died Apr. 27, 1895 age 8 yr. 7 m. 19 d.

Wayne County, Iowa Cemeteries, by Wayne County Genealogical Society, 1979. Page #290.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Susannah VanBibber and Thomas Hickerson
Melissa Hickerson and Fountain Baker Sampson
Lucy J. Sampson and Perry J. Wright

Mrs. Lucy WRIGHT died at her home southwest of LaPlata, Mo. 16 January 1907 from blood poison in her hand. She was the widow of the late Perry Wright and the mother of five surviving sons and one daughter.

The Macon Republican 1907.

Macon County Missouri Obituaries 1904 - 1920, Compiled by Phyllis E. Mears, Page #73
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Peter VanBebber and Martha Hunt
Martha E. VanBebber and Joseph Moad
Mary Jane Moad and Nicholas H. Schooler

SCHOOLER, Lucy J., et al minors. Filed 1 Mar 1893. Heirs of Nicholas H. Schooler, their father: Schooler, Lucy J., age 16 - Oct. 17, 1892; Thurcy L., age 13 - Mar. 30, 1892; Fletcher M., age 9 - July 7, 1892; William D., age 5 - June 2, 1892. Mary J. Schooler, widow of Nicholas Schooler made petition to be named gdn. 1 Mar. 1893. Appt. 15 Mar. 1893. She states they have interest in estate of James M. Schooler, the father of Nicholas H. SUR: Joseph E. Schooler & W.D. Hunt.

Wilson County, Kansas Estate Records From Probate Judge's Files 1866 through 1912, Volume II, 1981. Page #137.
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"Georgia Land Lottery - 1838 - Eighth District, First Section, Cherokee # 248. Henry V. Vanbibber, Wilson's, Pike.
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Basil Williams, age 62, in Lancaster Fairfield Hospital February 14. Survived by wife, Virginia; daughters, Mrs. Georgia Flowers, Rockbridge, O, and Miss Rita Williams of the residence; foster daughter, Miss Ginger Van Bibber of the residence; sisters, 1 brothers. Funeral service Monday, 2 p.m. at the Heinlein Funeral Home, Logan, Ohio with burial in Fairview Memorial Gardens near Rockbridge. Friends may call 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday.

Columbus Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio -- February 17, 1974 -- Sunday -- Page #14B
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Gerhart Clemens, a Mennonite, born 1680, probably in Switzerland, was the son of Jacob Clemens and came to Pennsylvania in 1709, settling first in Skippack, where in 1711 he purchased of Matthias Van Bebber a farm of one hundred acres. Matthias Van Bebber had received from the Proprietary, William Penn, six thousand acres of land situated in what was then Philadelphia, but now Montgomery County. This great tract was known as Bebber's Township and comprised all of

the present Perkiomen and Skippack Township.

The Strassburger Family and Allied Families of Pennsylvania, by Ralph Beaver Strassburger -- 1922 -- Page #454.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Peter VanBibber and Catherine Ridenour
Olive VanBibber and Thomas Ives Fulfer
Thomas "Coon" Ives Fulfer, Jr. and Martha L. Robertson

Miami Cemetery, Roberts Co., Texas
Fulfer, Martha L., Aug. 31, 1871, Jan. 4, 1951, Mother, A0546
Fulfer, Mrs. Olive, 1816, 1913, A0728
Fulfer, Thomas T., Jul. 10, 1868, Oct. 2, 1943, Father, A0546
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
John Yoakum and Rachel Grimes
Hughy Graham Yoakum and Nancy Emeline Branstetter


Yoakum, Oregon -- About 10 miles southeast of Echo, Hugh G. Yoakum bought a stock ranch along the Umatilla River. A native of Tennessee, he arrived in Pendleton in 1867 and elected county judge in 1872. Yoakum moved to Idaho in 1889 and the community is but a memory.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Van Bibber Reynolds and Elizabeth Buster
Mary Reynolds

Died on Sunday last; Mary, daughter of Mr. Van B. Reynolds, aged 2 years.
Western Courier -- June 17, 1823
Obituaries of Western Virginia Newspapers, 1822 - 1899, -- Volume 1 -- Kanawha Valley Genealogical Society. Page #118.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Reynolds
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Alethea Reynolds and James Clark McFarland

Died at his residence in this place Wednesday evening, the 9th inst., James C. McFarland, Esq., one of the oldest citizens of Charleston.
The West Virginia Journal -- November 16, 1864 -- Wednesday
Obituaries of Western Virginia Newspapers, 1822 - 1899, -- Volume 1 -- Kanawha Valley Genealogical Society -- Page #89.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Elizabeth VanBibber and Ezra Jeffords
Sarah Jane Jeffords and Stout St. Leger Barklow

Barklow, Stout -- 11 February 1898 -- Page 5:1

Died at his residence on E. 3rd St. on Thursday evening of the previous week; ex-policeman; 76 years old; he was born on 15 February 1822 in Enterprise Furnace, on Tygart Creek, in Greenup County, Kentucky; he came to Ohio as a young boy with his parents, and worked at Gaylord Roll Mills; in 1852 he went to California, but 2 years later came back; in 1855 he returned to California and remained there until 1859; before his return, he bought a lot in Oakland, a suburb of San Francisco; he leaves behind a widow and 3 grown children: Wm. E., Margaret J. Barklow, and Mrs. Agnes Roe, who is a teacher; he was also well known because he was 6 feet 4 inches tall; the funeral was on Sunday afternoon from the residence.
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Barklow, Sarah Jane -- 16 Jan 1903 -- Page 8:4

Died on Sunday evening at her residence on E. 3rd St.; she was the widow of Stout Barklow, who died 3 years ago; nee Jeffords; she was born on 20 January 1827 in Greenup County, Kentucky, and came here as a 2-year-old child with her parents; she leaves behind 3 children: W.E. Barklow, Margaret, and Mrs. Agnes E. Roe.

Translated Abstracts of Death Notices in the Portsmouth Correspondent 1894 - 1908 -- Abstracted and Translated by Jeffrey G. Herbert -- Edited by Barbara Keyser Gargiulo -- 2002.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds |
Peter VanBibber and Sarah Yoakum
Jacob VanBibber and ________________
Peter VanBibber and Sarah Jane Chancellar
Margaret VanBibber and Peter Ising
PETER ISING


Laid to Rest were the remains of Peter Ising Yesterday Afternoon

The funeral of Peter Ising, of Green River Island, Ky., occurred yesterday afternoon from his late residence in this city, and was very largely attended.

The services were held at 2 o'clock and were conducted by Rev., John T. Phillips, D.D., and by Lone Star Lodge, No. 56, A.O.U.W. of this city of which he was a member. Rev. Phillips is an eloquent pulpit orator and delivered a very impressive and felling discourse. The procession was a mile long. Over 500 Workmen were in line, and were led by a band of music. A multitude of people was at the cemetery to witness the solemn ceremony in which Lone Star Lodge officiated, assisted by Rev. Phillips. Mr. Ising was a Catholic, born in Germany. He was 58 years of age and died suddenly of asthma.

Evansville Journal -- Evansville, Vanderburg County, Indiana -- October 1, 1894
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
Sidney VanBibber and Millicent Joanna Raper

Dayton National Cemetery
Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio

Van Bibber, Sidney, d. 02/10/1916, Infantry, CPL, Res: Cincinnati, OH, Plot: 1 14 28, bur. 02/10/1916
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Ellinor VanBibber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Mary Jane VanBebber and William Bennett
Hiram Bennett and Malissa Jane Maloney

Hiram Bennett died after brief illness 4 Feb 1920, born 24 Jun 1846. He married Malissa Jane Maloney 13 Jul 1872. Three children, Lafayette, Mrs Ada Stone and Mrs Bernice Haggard. Also leaves sister. Mrs C E Murphy, Chillicothe and brother Richard of Kahoka, Mo.

Obituaries of The Browning Leader - Record (1920 - 1929) -- Volume II -- Page #2
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Albert Gallatin Boone and Ann Reid Hamilton
Eliza Yantis Boone and Henry William Jones


Henry W. Jones ……….. Eliza Y. Boone, both of Westport, April 17, 1856.

The Marriage Records of Jackson County, Missouri -- Volume Two - (1851 - 1865) -- Compiled and Published by Mrs. John Vineyard -- 1970 -- Page #29.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Martha __________
Absalom VanBaber and Francis A. Dickson
James Houston VanBibber and Elizabeth Jane Berry

VanBibber, J.H. ………. Berry, Bettie ………. 22 Feb 1899 ….. Book #6 ….. Page #287

Marriage Records of Stoddard County Missouri (1864 - 1899) -- Compiled and Edited by Grant Thorn and Mary Thorn -- Page #113.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
Elizabeth VanBebber and Alfred Snuffer
Thomas Preston Snuffer and Catherine E. Swartz

SNUFFER, Mrs. Thomas -- died 20 Nov 1896, northwest of Maysville, Mo., aged 30 years. She was the daughter of Samuel Swartz. Burial in Winslow cemetery.

Dekalb County Missouri Death Notices from Area Newspapers (1868 - 1903) -- Published by Northwest Genealogical Society -- St. Joseph, Missouri -- Page #48.
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" R, 88,91 Lease and Release: 11 and 12 Nov 1776 Thomas Heyward Junr of Charleston Esquire, to Joseph Ainger of Prince William Parish, SC, Planter for (British pound sign) 5 South Carolina money, 100 acres in parish on Pocotaligo Creek adjacent land of said Joseph Ainger, Jacob Van Bibber, John Grannier……."

" R, 91-95 Lease and Release: 29 and 30 Apr 1779, Joseph Ainger and Ann his wife, only daughter and heiress at law of John Miles of St. Andrews Parish, lately deceased, by his daughter Ann, one of the daughters of Thomas Butler deceased, for (British pound sign) 3,500 South Carolina money, to John Prioleau of Pocotaligo in Prince William Parish, 100 acres in Prince William Parish, Granville County, on Pocotaligo Creek, adjacent land of Jacob Van Bibber, John Gennceias, part track of 837 acres formally belonging to Thomas Butler, Esquire, of Pocotaligo deceased. ……. "
South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1783-1788 -- ISBN 0-913363-22-7 -- By Brent H. Holmes -- Page 201.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Absalom VanBaber and Francis A. Dickson
James Houston VanBibber and Rose __________
William Clarence VanBibber and Gertrude Mae Daniels
Thomas Houston VanBibber and Selva Louise Campbell
Alfred Darrell VanBibber

Elmwood Cemetery -

Alfred Darrell, son of T.H. Vanbibbler, Aug 13, 1937 - Nov 17, 1939

Blytheville, Mississippi County, Arkansas Cemetery Inscriptions -- Collected and Compiled by Mrs. Jeff Wade Jr. -- 1969 -- Page #179.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Jesse Yoakum, Sr. and Anna Berry
Isaac Yoakum and Emily Bruce
George Washington Yoakum and Rebecca Ann Johnston
Nellie Cleveland Yoakum

Born: YOAKUM - Moore Hill, near Pea Ridge, Mariposa County, April 28th, 1884, to the wife of G. W. YOAKUM, a daughter.

Mariposa Gazette -- Mariposa County, California -- May 3, 1884.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
William VanBebber and Elizabeth Barbee
Pryor Lee VanBebber and Mary Madison Hutchings
John Clayton VanBebber and Sallie D. Henry

Mr. John C. Van Bebber of Knoxville and Miss Sallie D. Henry of St. Joseph were united in marriage at the recorders office on Tuesday evening, January 26, 1904. The Reverend G. M. Gibson, Pastor of the Methodist Church officiating. They left immediately after the ceremony for Kansas City, to return in a few days. They have the best wishes of The Missourian.

The Missourian -- Richmond, Ray County, Missouri -- January 28, 1904 -- Page #8 -- Column #3
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Isaac Yoakum and Mary Davis
William Wylie Yoakum and Nancy Elizabeth Poff
Marcellus Yoakum and Callie Parker

Name: Sillus Yoakum
Death Date: 17 May 1910
Age 55 yr.
Cemetery: Robinson Cemetery
Description: Located at Rich Hill, Missouri

Name: Calla Yoakum
Death Date: 26 Feb 1930
Age: 67 yr., 3 da.
Cemetery: Robinson Cemetery
Description: Located at Rich Hill, Missouri

Cemetery Records of Bates County, Missouri -- Volume VI -- Part II
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IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Solomon H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
William VanBibber and Frances Ann Thoroughman
Lawson VanBibber


Name: VanBibber, Lawson
Occupation: hostler
Location: r. 3845 Laclede Avenue
City: St. Louis
State: MO
Year: 1890
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Solomon H. VanBibber and Mary Jane Bryson
William VanBibber and Frances Ann Thoroughman
Millard Fillmore VanBibber

Name: VanBibber, Millard
Occupation: hostler
Location: r. 3845 Laclede Avenue
City: St. Louis
State: MO
Year: 1890

St. Louis, Missouri Directories, 1889 - 1890
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iDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Isaac C. VanBebber and Margaret Catherine Frazier
Andrew Jackson VanBebber and Nancy Elizabeth Coffey
Charles VanBebber and Ina Francis Roper
Truman Troy VanBebber and Elizabeth Lue Fritch
Charles Wayne VanBebber and Susan Marie Pearson

"The United States has set up military missions throughout the formerly communist world, creating situations in which majors, lieutenant colonels, and full colonels are often advising foreign generals and chiefs of staff. Make no mistake: these officers are policy-makers by another name. A Romanian-speaking expert on the Balkans, Army Lieutenant Colonel Charles van Bebber, has become well known in top military circles in Bucharest for helping to start the reform process that led to Romania's integration with NATO. Such small-scale but vital relationships give America an edge there over its Western European allies. One of the reasons that countries like Romania and Bulgaria supported the U.S. invasion of Iraq is that they now see their primary military relationship as being with America rather than with NATO as such."

The Atlantic Monthly -- July/August 2003
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Mr. Merida Moore, of Troupe County, Georgia, died at the home of Henry Van Bibber in Zebulon, Pike County, Georgia, on August 9, 1836, while traveling from his parents home in Wilkes County to La Grange, Georgia, his place of residence when he was suddenly taken ill.

As reported in the Southern Recorder of Milledgeville, Georgia, August 16, 1836.

Abstracts of Georgia death notices from the Southern Register.
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Mrs. Ann Little died on June 3, 1851, at the residence of her son, H. Van Bibber, of Shreveport, Louisiana. Mrs. Ann Little was a native of Charleston District, South Carolina. She was 83 years of age and she was a member of the Baptist Church.
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Southern Christain Advocate, December 12, 1851 as printed in Marriage and Deaths from the Southern Christain Advocate. Volume #1, 1837 - 1860, Page #253.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Absolam VanBaber and Francis A. Dickson
William Alford VanBibber and Mary Gertrude Smith
Bremen A. VanBibber and Helen Irene Scism

NEW SCHOOL HEAD PLANS MOVING HERE
Bremen Van Bibber, the newly elected principal of Sikeston high school, was here this week making arrangements for moving his family from Malden, where they have been located for the past several years.
Mr. and Mrs. Van Bibber and their daughter, Mary Nell, 11, will live in the Albritton Apartments on Hunter Avenue.
Mrs. Van Bibber will teach in the elementary grades during the school year--probably in the South grade school building, though exact plans have not as yet been made.
The Sikeston Herald -- Sikeston, Scott County, Missouri -- July 6, 1944 -- Thursday -- Page #6.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
James VanBebber and Elizabeth Snuffer
William Nicholas VanBebber and Martha Osborn
Roy Vest VanBebber and Anne Lavinia Wenner
John Gregory VanBebber and Bessie Vondell Guthrie

TROY - Mr. and Mrs. Greg VanBebber arrived in Troy the first of the week on their way to their new home near Robinson. The VanBebbers have been living in Sweetwater, Texas, but Greg has given up his work there to come back to Kansas where he was born and reared to become a Kansas farmer. They will be at the home of Greg's mother, Mrs. Ann VanBebber until their home is ready for occupancy.

Atchison Daily Globe -- Atchison, Atchison County, Kansas -- January 18, 1953.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro
Sons: Calvin and Marcellus Renfro

HISTORY OF MERCER COUNTY

Calvin and Marcellus Renfro also came to the county in 1838. They had emigrated from Knox County, Ky., two years before, and located in Ray County, Mo. On coming to Mercer County, Calvin located one and one-half miles northwest of Modena, on the farm now owned by David Horne. Marcellus settled about three-fourths of a mile south of his present residence. Samuel Chesnut, a brother-in-law of the Renfros, located at about the same time two and one-half miles southwest of Modena.

Note: Samuel Chesnut married Jane Renfro on December 12, 1839 in Livingston County, Missouri. Jane was the sister of Calvin and Marcellus. (GRH)

History, Harrison and Mercer Counties Missouri , From the Earliest Time to the Present; Together with Sundry Personal, Business and Professional Sketches and Family Records -- Mercer and Harrison County Genealogical Societies, St. Louis and Chicago: The Goodspeed Publishing Co. 1888 -- Reprinted 2000 -- Pages #395 & 396.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Martha VanBebber and George Yoakum, Sr.
Jesse Yoakum, Sr. and Anna Berry
William Yoakum and Sarah W. Stone
Mary Ann Yoakum and William McTeer Grimes

Mary A. Grimes, 80 yrs., 1 mo., 16 days; white female; b. 4/6/1853, MO.; widowed; d. 5/22/1933, in home in Fresno; service in chapel; bur. 5/24/1993, North Selma Cemetery. Father was William Yoakum, b. MO.; mother, _____ Stone. Services charged to Claude and Harry Grimes, Selma. [Notes: A second address for Claude/Clyde Grimes, 940 Pier Avenue, Santa Monica, CA.]

The Thomas-Robinson Funeral Home -- Selma, California -- Abstracted Records 1890-1949 -- Compiled by Rebecca F. Greer -- 1996 -- Page #345.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally, Jr.
Lewis Fry Donnally and Miriam VanBibber Welch
Amelia Smith Donnally and William Garland Hubbard

Mrs. Magnus Tate, who has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Hubbard, of Brooks street, returned Thursday to her home in Cincinnati, O.

The Charleston Daily Mail -- Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia -- July 16, 1931 -- Thursday -- Page #4.
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Hannah VanBibber and Joshua Rawlings
Elizabeth Rawlings and Jacob Lawson
William C. Lawson and Laura ________
Sallie Lawson

LAWSON, SALLIE — 19 Jul 1895 — Page 3:7
The 12-year-old daughter of Mr. William C. Lawson, who owns a house on Chillicothe St., died on Tuesday after a long illness from pneumonia; buried on Wednesday in Mt. Zion, Kentucky.

Translated Abstracts of Death Notices in the Portsmouth Correspondent 1894 - 1908
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Hannah VanBibber and Joshua Rawlings
Lois Rawlings and Nicholas Fisher Thom
Clark Thom

THOM, MRS. LORUSIA V.: IWR NOV. 28, 1896
Aged 79 years, died Sunday evening at the home of her son, Clark Thom, of No. 226 south 7th street of asthma. Interment at Short Branch, Kentucky.
[external link]
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IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Minerva B. Reynolds and Philip Garland Todd
Aletha Elizabeth Todd and Richard Ellis Putney, Jr.
Annette Todd Putney and Otis Adonijah Thayer

Birthday Celebration
Celebrating the anniversary of her birth, Mrs. Annette P. Thayer entertained at her home in South Hills Wednesday. Her guests were Mrs. R. A. Norvell, Mrs. A. M. Putney, Mrs. I. J. Stanley, Mrs. Jennie Dorsey, Mrs. Irene Putney, Mrs. C. Q. Crockett, Mrs. M. K. Cracraft, Mrs. Henry Huling and Mrs. Annie Crawford.

Note: Annette Putney Thayer was born on March 18, 1844 in Kanawha Co., Virginia now West Virginia. (GRH)
The Charleston Daily Mail -- Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia -- March 20, 1925 -- Friday -- Page #8.
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Mrs. Mamie Wood VanBibber vs. John W. VanBibber. Fulton Superior Court. Fall Term, 1901. No. 9011. To John W. VanBibber. Greeting: By order of court, you are hereby notified that on the 29th day of June, 1901, Mamie Wood VanBibber filed suit against you for total divorce, returnable to the fall term, 1901, of said court. You are hereby required to be and appear at the fall term, 1901, of said court, to be held in and for said county on the first Monday in September, 1901, then and there to answer petitioner's complaint, as in default thereof the court will proceed as to justice shall appertain.
Witness, The Honorable J. H. Lumpkin, judge of said court, this the 30th day of June 1901.
ARNOLD BROYLES,
Clerk Superior Court, Fulton County, Ga.
The Atlanta Constitution -- Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia -- August 5, 1901.
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Last evening at the residence of Dr. Len G. Broughton, Mrs. Mamie Wood Vanbibber and Mr. C. F. Slade were married, Dr. Broughton performing the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Slade will be at home to their friends at their home, 106 East Ellis street.
The Atlanta Constitution -- Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia -- January 5, 1904.
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Cincinnati, Oct. 17 --
On the night of October 4, Andrew Vanbibber of this city, shot his wife, mistaking her for a burglar. This matter was kept secret, and Mrs. Vanbibber was put under treatment at the Cincinnati hospital. Last night the secret leaked out and was published today. Vanbibber was arrested but instantly released on the belief that the shooting was accidental. The attempt at secrecy has given the affair an air of mystery, and will cause a full investigation. Mrs. Vanbibber is at the point of death tonight.
Atlanta Constitution -- Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia -- October 18, 1881 -- Tuesday.
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IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro
Charity Renfro and Joseph W. Michaux
Richard Walters Michaux and Julia Ann Skaggs
Sarah Alice Michaux and Meredith Walker Henry

~Michaux Bible~
Joseph W. Michaux
b. 1809, d. Sept. 21, 1865,
mar. Dec. 28, 1829 Charity Renfrow
b. 1812, d. 1866.

R.W. Michaux
b. July 13, 1834, d. Mar. 6, 1917,
mar. Aug. 28, 1856 Julia Ann Skaggs
b. May 1, 1837, d. May 4, 1898.

Sarah Alice Michaux
b. Sept. 30, 1859,
mar. July 1876 Meredith Walker Henry
b. Mar. 31, 1860, d. Oct. 25, 1895
Bible Records of Calloway County and Adjoining Counties -- Collected By The Calloway County, Kentucky Genealogical Society -- 1971 -- Page #248.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Martha __________
Jesse VanBaber and Elizabeth Yewell
Absolom B. VanBaber and Lucinda Hogg
Jesse James VanBaber and Ellen Dunning
Bertha Elizabeth VanBaber

Vanbaber, __________, b. 19 Jul 1906, white, male, alive, b. Liv. Co., f. Jess Vanbaber.

Vanbaber, Bertha Elizabeth, b. 1 Nov 1908, white, female b. Vicker's Farm Liv. Co., f. Jesse Vanbaber, m. Ellen Dunning, pts b & r Liv. Co.

Livingston County, Kentucky Vital Statistics Birth Records 1852-1908, By Juanita Walker Drennan and Mary Stalion Singleton -- 1978 -- Pages #265 & 283.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Ezekial VanBibber and Susan Rice
Susan VanBibber and John W. Green
Julia Lee Green and Melvin Little
Georgia L. Little and Alph C. Carr

Groom: Carr, Alph
Marriage Status: Single
Age: 30
Place of Birth: Boyd County
Bride: Little, Georgia
Marriage Status: Single
Age: 19
Place of Birth: Greenup County
Date of Marriage: August 30, 1919 -- Greenup County, Kentucky.

1912-1920 Greenup, Kentucky Marriages -- By: Paul R. Howard, Greenup, Kentucky -- June 1993 -- Page #5.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Olive VanBibber and Nathan Boone
Jemima Boone and Henry Zumwalt
Minerva Ann Zumwalt and Lilburn Mathew Maxwell
Vinnie Ella Maxwell and Julian Jesse Anderson

The Jewel (Julian Jesse) Anderson family, which included his wife, Vinnie V. Ella (Maxwell), and his six children: Ruby (Weaver), Cecil "Buz" (deceased), Leonard, Vivian (Crank), Valter, and Opal (McCurdy), lived first in the Dolberg community where they farmed. Later, they moved into the town of Roff. Here Jewel began his long tenure as the town's City Marshal.
The Little Town of Roff -- By Evan Thomas Tingle -- Copyright 1978 -- Page #188.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Minerva B. Reynolds and Philip Garland Todd
Aletha Elizabeth Todd and Richard Ellis Putney, Jr.
David Henry Putney and Irene Bell

Putney Services --
Funeral services were held Wednesday morning for Mrs. Irene Belle Putney, 80 years old, who died Sunday night at the home of a daughter, Mrs. J.J. Steinmetz in Washington street. Rev. J. E. Waynland, of the Malden Presbyterian church, conducted the rites at the Steinmetz residence. Burial was in Spring Hill Cemetery.
The Charleston Daily Mail -- Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia -- October 26, 1932 -- Wednesday.

Note: Irene Bell was the daughter of Robert S. Bell and Gertrude Green
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
J. W. Thompson
was born Jun 11, 1914 in Tn,
and died Sep 7, 1987 in HCMC, Henry Co, Paris, Tn.
He md Rosa Louise Gillihan Jul 20, 1941, daughter of William Gillihan and Rilla Gray. She was born Aug 3, 1916 in Eddyville, Ky, and died Mar 20, 1986 in HCMC, Henry Co, Paris, Tn. Both are buried in Rose Lawn Memory Gardens, Henry Co, Tn
Child of J Thompson and Rosa Gillihan is:
Neal J Thompson, born Dec 30, 1942.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`
VANBIBBER, ADNEY IJRN DEC. 01, 1869
Died November 27th at the residence of the late Maj. C. Van Bibber, Greenupsburg, Mr. Adney Van Bibber, aged 63 years.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CYRUS IJRN SEPT. 29, 1869
Died on September 5th, aged 70 years 2 months, Bro. Cyrus VanBibber.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VAN BIBBER, JAMES T. I.R. JUN. 16, 1853
Married on the 1st inst., at Cannonsburgh, Ky., by Rev. Mr. Mavity, James T. Van Bibber, Esq., to Miss Evoline Raison
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William Nowell, John Vanbebber, James Renfro, William Robertson, and James Roddye, were the first trustees of the Speedwell Academy. John VanBebber, which was most likely his school of learning, helped this facility. At one time an education from this school was ranked with a college education. Here the young boys learned such things as law, Latin, math and other useful schooling for business purposes. Later, the Academy was used as a school for both boys and girls.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jackson County, West Virginia - 1914 Marriage Records
07 Jan 1914
VAN BIBBER, Cyrus Biggs 26 born Greenup Co., Ky./residing Cabell Co., WV
HOLLIDAY, Florence Lee 23 born Ohio Co., WV/residing Jackson Co.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Susannah VanBibber and Thomas Hickerson
Melissa Hickerson and Fountain Baker Sampson
Thomas Sampson and Constance Margaret Sears

Married 13 February 1881, Mr. Thomas SAMPSON, late of Colorado, and Miss Tonie SEARS, daughter of J.M. SEARS of Easley township.
~~~~~~~~~~~
Mrs. Constance W. Sampson, 25, of Easley township, Macon county, Missouri died 10 December 1885 from lung disease. She had been a Missouri resident all her life. She leaves a husband. Interment in Shirley cemetery.
Macon County Missouri Marriages and Deaths 1874-1888
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Susannah VanBibber and Thomas Hickerson
Melissa Hickerson and Fountain Baker Sampson
Lucy J. Sampson and Willis Perry Wright

Mrs. Lucy WRIGHT died at her home southwest of LaPlata, Mo. 16 January 1907 from blood poison in her hand. She was the widow of the late Perry WRIGHT and the mother of five surviving sons and one daughter.
Macon County Missouri Obituaries 1904-1920 -- Compiled by Phyllis E. Mears -- 1989 -- Page #73.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Britten, John - VanBiber, Martha m. December 23, 1841
Wise, Granvill - VanBiber, Sarah Ann m. September 10, 1846

Johnson County Illinois Early Marriages 1834-1877, -- Volume #1
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vardeman Brady Pierce, son of David C. and Emily Pierce,
born 8 Apr 1878
and died 4 Mar 1936.
Married Lizzie Herriman 1901 and died 1910. Leaves sisters and brother Minnie Kerns of Starbuck WA; Telitha Cavella of Walla Walla WA; Emma McCall of Seattle WA; Bettie Burcher of Hope AR; George of Pendleton and James of Purdin. Burial Pierce Cemetery.

Obituaries of The Browning Leader-Record, 1930-1939, Volume III -- Compiled by: The Genealogy Researchers of Linn County, Missouri -- Page #52 -- March 12, 1936.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Myron Lorene Bennett, daughter of Lafe and Mary Bennett
born 8 Mar 1910 died 26 Feb 1935. Preceded by brother Cecil R. and sister Audrey H. Left are parents, 3 sisters and brother Ruth, Marie and Carlyle of home; Mrs. Paul Roach of Linneus. Burial Jenkins Cemetery. Senior girls, flower girls and pallbearers.

Obituaries of The Browning Leader-Record, 1930-1939, Volume III -- Compiled by: The Genealogy Researchers of Linn County, Missouri -- Page #40 -- March 7, 1935.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Melissa Jane Bennett the daughter of Simeral and Rhoda Maloney was born 6 Sep 1852 and died 25 Jun 1925. Married Hiram Bennett of Linn County July of 1872. Three children born, Mrs. Will Stone, Browning; Mrs. S.W. Cotter, Brookfield and Lafayette of Browning. Husband died five years ago. Leaves also sisters, Mrs. Dan Crump of Reger, Mrs. Lewis Nickell of Galt; brothers, Hugh and Will Maloney of Galt, Mo. Burial Mundell Cemetery.

Obituaries of The Browning Leader-Record, 1920-1929, Volume II -- Compiled by: The Genealogy Researchers of Linn County, Missouri -- Page #58 -- July 2, 1925.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Kentucky Vital Statistics, Death Records, Volume 065, Certificate 25630, Death Volume 1911: "Susan Green,
age 56, died in Greenup County, Kentucky on October 21, 1911.
Susan (Van Bibber) Green
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christinia _______________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
Peter VanBibber Jr. and Marguery Bounds
James VanBibber and Jane Irvine
Joseph VanBibber and Susan Boone
Sarah VanBibber and Asa Woodward
Cinderella Woodward and Robert L. Doggett

315:124:5 ROBERT L. DOGGETT, son of William Carlane and Jane Philadelphia
(Redman) Doggett; b. Mar 1863, CA; m. CINDERELLA ("Rilla") WOODWARD, dau. of
Asa and Sarah (Van Bibber) Woodward, b. Jul 1877, MO. Resided Johnston, WA,
in 1903.
Children (Doggett):
315:124:51 ADRA J. DOGGETT; b. Nov 1893, ID.
315:124:52 EVA G. DOGGETT; b. Apr 1895, WA.
315:124:53 WILLIAM C. DOGGETT; b. Jun 1897, WA.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ruby H. VANBEBER,
born May 14, 1935 in BELL Co., KY;
Mother: Mary BENNETT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Clyde C. VAN BIBBER,
born Jan 23, 1931 in GREENUP Co., KY;
Mother Carrie FIELDS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WILBUR VANBIBBER (17 Nov 1902 - 15 Nov 1994)

THELMA VANBIBBER (19 Jun 1908 - 28 Dec 1987) first wife of Wilbur VanBibber.

JACQUE VANBIBBER (Nov. 2, 1913 - Jan. 20, 1998) Second Wife of Wilbur Van Bibber
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ___________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Matilda VanBibber and James Estill
Tantha V. Estill and Daniel Boone Davis
Samuel Estill Davis

Obituary:
Samuel Estill Davis,
second son of Boone and Tantha Davis, born Aug. 11, 1852, died Aug. 27, 1885,
born and lived in Montgomery Co., MO. until Apr 1875 when he went to Calif.
He died of intermittent fever at the home of his uncle Will Estill in Bieber,
Lassen Co., and was buried at Adlin, Modoc Co., CA. (9 Oct 1885)
NOTE: Will Estill was William Kavanaugh Estill the
brother to Samuel's mother. William married Margaret Ellen Larch on October
19, 1848 in Callaway County, Missouri.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
James VanBibber and Lois Reynolds
Cyrus VanBibber, Sr. and Mary S. Rachel Timberlake
James Timberlake VanBibber and Evaline Raison
Charles VanBibber

Sacramento City Cemetery 1875 - 1885

Van Bibber, C. died 18 Oct 1885 age 18 yrs, 8 mths, 18 days.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VICTORIA COUNTY, TEXAS

31 July 1886
VAN BIBBER, Major - d. Feb 1884 (Probate)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bibber, Andrew Harrington Page 524 History of Orange County - 1921

Capt Andrew Harrington BIBBER was married to Mrs. Annie L. BIBBER, born at St. John, NB, the daughter of John ANNESLEY, and the granddaughter of Daniel ANNESLEY. Mrs. ANNESLEY was Lucy HAYDEN born at Beacon Hill, Boston. Grandfather Aaron HAYDEN was a native of MA and married Ruth Alden JONES, who proudly traced her New England lineage back to the famous John ALDEN. At Eastport, ME on Sepl 27 1876, Annie L. ANNESLEY married Capt Andrew Harrington BIBBER, a native of Lubec, ME, the son of Charles BIBBER. His mother was Adeline HARRINGTON, born at Eastport. Grandfather Andrew HARRINGTON was a member of a family that belonged to some of the originial settlers of Concord, MA. Captain BIBBER served as capt of the First Maine Cavalry throughout the Civil War.
He was an artist of ability and noted as a marine painter. In 1890 Capt and Mrs. BIBBER came to CA and located at Orange. On October 7 1912, Capt BIBBER died. One child was born, Alice Alden. She became the wife of Ray O. Van BIBBER. Captain BIBBER's first wife was Miss Sarah HOUGHTON of Eastport ME, daughter of Hon Partman HOUGHTON. She died in Boston, leaving a daughter, Edith Prince BIBBER. From DAR:
Andrew Harrington BIBBER born July 22 1837 Lubec ME; died Oct 8 1913 Orange CA
Father: Charles; mother Adeline HARRINGTON born 1813 Eastport ME; died 1881 same
Wife: Annie Louise ANSLEY (sic?) married Sept 27 1876 East Port ME, born July 11, 1854.
Father: John ANSLEY, born Feb 14 1814 St. John New Brunswick
married Lucy Ann Sharp HAYDEN born 1819 Beacon Hill Boston; died Nov 8 1901 Orange CA
Andrew's brothers and sisters: Sophia, Charles, Gerturde, Herbert, Marie, Frances, Lucy Caroline and George Walter.
Annie L. Van BIBBER died age 83 in Los Angeles Feb 5 1938.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sebastopol Plantation. Documents, 1858, 1859. 2 items. Location: Misc. Sales (notarized copies) of Sebastopol Plantation and slaves in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, from Ulger Henry Lauve of New Orleans to Henry Van Bibber of St. Bernard Parish and from Van Bibber to Mrs. James H. Haynie of Lagrange County, Texas.
Source: Manuscript Resources on
the History of New Orleans
Before the Civil War in the
Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
BIBBER, Capt. Andrew H.
B: 1837
D:10/6/13
GAR D 1ST CAV MAIN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~America Louisa VanBibber married William Thomas Crafton in Vanderburgh County,
Indiana, June 23, 1873. On the marriage application, an Isaac VanBibber states America has
neither father, mother, nor guardian and was fourteen years old. The identity
of America VanBibber has not been established at this time.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Vardeman VanBebber and Elinore Francis Dodson
Nancy Elizabeth VanBebber and James Edward Merrick
Sadie Elizabeth Merrick and Lewis E. Grice
Loyd Gale Grice


Grice, Loyd C. -- 1913 - 1915 son of L.E. & S.E.
Grice, Lewis E. -- May 25, 1889 -- May 23, 1963
Grice, Sadie E. -- Aug. 18, 1890 --Mar. 12, 1964

Cemeteries in Jackson & Benton Townships, Linn County, Missouri -- Vol. VIII --Printed August 1992 -- Page #25.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Jacob Davis married Eunice Dixon the Daughter of Sophia Veronica Van Bibber
and George Dixon.
Jacob's father was William Davis who according to land records and court records knew the Van Bibbers in Greenbriar Co., Virginia and Monroe County. William Davis's family were killed by the Indians and he was taken by the Sandusky Indians and raised by a squaw mother. He was given to her by the #1 chief. When he returned to the white man settlement he was about 18 or 20 years old. He married Mary Packwood. In this part of Virginia during the 1770-80's there were not many settlers of settlements. William is mentioned often in excepts from county records with other early settlers of Greenbriar County, such as George Dixon, the Van Bibbers, and the Ellisons, to name a few. They all have some family connection to William through marriage. John Van Bibber had built a powder mill in Greenbriar County, where William must have learned to make gun powder as was mentioned in the Court Hearing. The Van Bibbers, also had something to do with the founding of Point Pleasant on the Ohio River. John VanBibber and William Davis were arrested for making gun powder and they were thought to have given it to the Indians. William was put on town arrest and was not to leave the Commonwealth for a year or go see his Indian family. They were arraigned for disloyalty. John Vanbibbers charge was dismissed. William was held bound to the court, because he had learned the art of making gun powder and his Indian ties. Also, William's Indian mother brought food to him but would not go to his house. She was seen leaving it a ways away from the house.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Jacob VanBibber and Sarah Miller
Ezekial VanBibber and Susan Rice
Elizabeth VanBibber and (1)William Henry Nethercutt

The true story begins with a Eugenis Nethercutt applying for a Widows Pension for the soldier William Henry Nethercutt.
A search was begun to find out if William Henry Nethercutt had an undivorced wife in Ohio or Kentucky.
In the meantime, Elizabeth Van Bibber had married Benjamin F. Williams

Document # 4 - Shows no record of a marriage between Elizabeth Van Bibber Nethercutt and Benjamin F. Williams in Kentucky or Ohio. (She claimed to have been married in Ohio)

Document #5 - Shows no record of divorce of Elizabeth Van Bibber and William Henry Nethercutt in Ohio.

Document #6 - Shows no record of divorce of Elizabeth Van Bibber and William Henry Nethercutt in Kentucky.

Document #9 - Elizabeth VanBibber Nethercutt Williams says she was the true wife and undivorced from William Henry Nethercutt, and on April 11, 1910 she applied for the Widows Pension and stated a wedding date of January 20, 1853.
Document #11 - The deposition of Elizabeth VanBibber Nethercutt Williams says Nethercutt came home from the war and got in some trouble and left the country and she never heard for him or of him until 1904, when she heard he was alive and in Nebraska. She goes on to say that Benjamin F. Williams was killed from ambush in August of 1892 and his killers were never caught or punished. She further states that she and William Henry Nethercutt lived together as man and wife after he came home from the war, that he got jealous of a man and killed him and left the country and she never heard from him or about him for some 17 years when she got a letter from one of William Nethercutt's brothers telling her that he had been killed someplace out west and his wife had applied for a Widows Pension.

Document #25 - Benjamin F. Williams, Jr. says his mother believed William Henry Nethercutt to be dead when she married Benjamin F. Williams.

Document #41 - William Henry Nethercutt married and divorced two times in Nebraska before he married Eugenia.

Document #52 - In a second deposition by Elizabeth Van Bibber Nethercutt Williams she said William Henry Nethercutt was living in adultery with another woman when a man told him he should not be doing that and should go home to Elizabeth and the kids. He got mad and killed the man. Nethercutt told Elizabeth (according to Elizabeth) the night he left that if she found a man who would treat her right to marry him because he had never treated her right. Elizabeth and Williams married 2 years and 2 months after Nethercutt left. Nethercutt gave their children to his brother to raise, as well as all of his property. Elizabeth kept the youngest by William Nethercutt (six months old) for 2 years and then sent him to live with his siblings.

Document #61 - Elizabeth says Ben Williams was killed by Ike and Marion Whitaker, brothers to the two Witakers that had married her daughters.

Document #73 - Son, William Nethercutt, Jr., says that Ben Williams had some trouble with George Whitaker and there was a grudge so the Whitaker brothers killed him.

Both pensions were denied.
Pension File Claim No. # 859545
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Granville VanBebber and Margaret Jane VanBebber
Aljernon VanBebber and Margarett Ann Lytle

SUNSET HILL CEMETERY -- WARRENSBURG,
JOHNSON COUNTY, MISSOURI

Van Bibber, Margarett Ann
Born: 12 Feb 1877
Died: 22 May 1953
Cemetery: Sunset Hill
1953 - Page #2

Van Bebber, Algernon
Born: 25 Mar 1880
Died: 04 Apr 1966
Cemetery: Sunset Hill
1966 - Page #3

Index to 104 Years of Funerals 1886 Through 1990 in Warrensburg, Missouri at Cheatham & McMeekin & Sweeney-Phillips Funeral Homes -- Printed with permission by West Central Missouri Genealogical Society Warrensburg, Missouri -- Indexed and copyright by Charles D. Eldridge.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Vanbibber: Isaac
MOTHER: Mollie Schaffer MW
Jun 27, 1895
Vanbibber, Ethel:
FATHER: (WILLIAM) Albert VAN BIBBER
Anna Mary Sutton FW
Apr 29, 1882
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Child's name, Father, Mother, Sex, Race, Date of birth, book, page.

LUCAS, ---,
FATHER: JNO,
MOTHER: M J, VANBIBBER,
M-W Mar 29, 1894, H-5, 20

LUCAS, ---,
FATHER: JOHN,
MOTHER: ---, VANBIBBER,
F-W Jan 26, 1896, H-6, 2

VANBIBBER, ---,
FATHER: ALBERT, ---, ---,ANN MARY SUTTON
F, W, Apr 29, 1882, H-1, 14

VANBIBBER, ---,
FATHER: ISAAC,
MOTHER: MOLLIE, SCHAFFER,
M, W, Jun 27, 1895, H-5, 32
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Mallie
Jun 29, 1895
38 yrs Vanderburgh Co.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibtin, Male
Dec 21, 1898
60 yrs Newburgh
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, ELZA
Date of Death: Monday, October 12, 1942
Age: 68
WIFE: HELEN LUTTRELL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CARRIE
Date of Death: Sunday, May 18, 1941
Age: 58
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, FAY C
Date of Death: Tuesday, October 03, 1944
Age: 61
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CHAS
Date of Death: Sunday, November 08, 1964
Age: 54
WIFE: CHARLOTTE
DIED AS A RESULT OF FIGHTING GRASS FIRE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, GEORGE M
Date of Death: Monday, July 07, 1952
Age: 56
WIFE: ETHEL
VETERAN WW1
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, ANDREW C
Friday, September 19, 1980
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CLAUDE H
Tuesday, May 18, 1965
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, DAVID
Tuesday, February 14, 1978
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, EARL
Sunday, October 16, 1977
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, MAE ELIZABETH
Thursday, March 06, 1986
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, ERNEST C
Monday, November 26, 1984
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, ESTHER
Thursday, July 28, 1977
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, FAY C
Friday, April 01, 1977
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, GROVER C
Wednesday, January 05, 1949
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, HAZEL
Monday, September 11, 1972
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CHRISTINA MARIE
Thursday, October 03, 1991
SUNSET MEMORIAL PARK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, CURTIS ODELL
Saturday, August 29, 1998
PARK LAWN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, ETHEL C
Sunday, August 23, 1992
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vanbibber, George V
Wednesday, June 06, 1990
St Peters in Waverly Ky
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, LEONA FRAME
Tuesday, January 12, 1993
ROSE HILL IN NEWBURGH
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, MAYZELL
Tuesday, March 24, 1998
PARK LAWN
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, MICHAEL D SR
Monday, July 13, 1992
SUNSET MEMORIAL PARK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VANBIBBER, NATHAN INF
Monday, January 16, 1995
SUNSET MEMORIAL PARK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Ronald
Monday, April 19, 1999
Park Lawn,Evansville with Military Rites
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Lucille E
Sunday, September 12, 1999
Sunset Memorial Gardens,Evansville
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber , Alvin R
Tuesday, March 28, 2000
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Eva Mae
Thursday, October 11, 2001
Park Lawn Evansville
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VanBibber, Shirley A
Tuesday, January 14, 2003
Park Lawn Evansville
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Margaret VanBebber and David Ross, Sr.
David Ross, Jr. and Martha Jayne
Daniel Boone Ross and Nancy Ellen Fannin
Daniel Sanford Ross and Cora Belle Kelley
Winfred Clarence Ross


Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Ross of South Webster have been advised by the war department that a son, Pfc. Winifred C. Ross, 26, who was reported missing in action since May 14, had been killed on duty May 12. Mr. & Mrs. Ross received the first message about the son's being missing late in May. Pfc. Ross was serving with the infantry and when last heard from was stationed in Italy. He had been in the service the last two years. His father is employed in a war plant in Baltimore. Besides his parents he is survived by five brothers and three sisters, Pfc. Elmer Ross, serving with the army in France, Elbert Ross, employed in Cleveland, Pvt. Harold Ross, stationed at Eadenton, N.C. with the marine corps, Mrs. Goldie Allen and Mrs. Sylvia Shriver of Urbana, Mrs. Bertha Allen, Elmo and Charles Ross at home.

The Portsmouth Daily Times -- Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Benjamin Harrison Holcomb --
111 years, 4 months, 29 days
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Alvis Greer Yoakum --
107 years, 7 months, 20 days
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nada Van Bebber Laurance --
107 years, 1 month, 26 days
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Grace Morris Van Bebber --
106 years, 10 months, 17 days
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Margaret VanBeber Green --
104 years, 4 months, 1 day
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bertha Farmer Hawkins --
102 years, 4 months, 0 days
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
James Calvin Keenan --
100 years, 0 months, 2 days
Calvin James Keenan was born in Nicholas County, West Virginia. "Uncle Cal" would live to be 100 years old and died in April of 1982. He was survived by 6 children (4 daughters and 2 sons), 17 grandchildren, and 46 great-grandchildren
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dorothy Thayer Smith,
100, of Charleston died April 27, 1998
NOTE: 1. Dorothy Putney Thayer married Harrison Bowne Smith on June 23, 1920 in
Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia. Marriage Book #8, Page #7.
2. Harrison Smith and Dorothy Thayer had a son Harrison Bowne Smith, Jr.
(21 Apr 1924 - 5 Sep 1957) who is buried in Spring Hill cemetery, Charleston,
Kanawha County, West Virginia.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Matthias VanBibber and Margaret Robinson
Olive Boone VanBibber and Robert Keenan
William Van Keenan and Electra Caroline Grose
Rhuema Ann Keenan and Charles Wesley Preast
Inscription:
CHARLES W.
PREAST
APR. 28, 1836
MAR. 24, 1926
Gone, but not forgotten

Charles W. Prease was born in Bedford county, Virginia April 28, 1826. He died at his home near Vinton in this county, March 24, 1926. Had he lived a little more than a month longer he would have been ninety years old. From 1857 to 1860 he was a farm laborer in Monroe county. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army. He was in the battles of First Manassas, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and others. He was a member of General Pickett's division that made the famous charge of Gettysburg Heights in 1863. He had a retentive memory and could give a minute account of marches, battles and other events of the Civil war that came within the range of his observation.

He came to Nicholas about the close of the Civil war. In 1866 he married Miss Annie R. Keenan, a daughter of the late William Keenan with whom he lived fifty-two years. Mrs. Prease passed away eight years ago. They raised a large family of whom fours sons and three daughter survive.

He was a man of unusual physical strength and powers of endurance and was very industrious; he said that he could not be contented unless he was at work, of those who knew him.

Burial services took place at the Keenan graveyard near Salem Church on the 26th.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan CEMETERY RECORDS:

Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Margaret VanBebber and David Ross, Sr.
David Ross, Jr. and Martha Jayne
Daniel Boone Ross and Nancy Ellen Fannin
Daniel Sanford Ross and Cora Belle Kelley
Elbert Curtis Ross

SOUTH WEBSTER CEMETERY
Ross, Cora B. Feb. 14, 1892 - Feb. 28, 1980
Daniel S. Aug. 9, 1888 - July 7, 1946
Elbert C. Aug. 26, 1914 - Oct. 20, 1970

Gravestone Inscriptions of Scioto County, Ohio -- Volume No. 6 -- Bloom Township -- Page #68 -- By Virgil and Marguerite Ramsey -- April 1992.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
Robert VanBeber and Margaret Jane Susong
George VanBeber and Martha Ann Pridemore
Robert Brown VanBeber and Katherine Elizabeth Pennington

A. R. DYCHE MEMORIAL CEMETERY
Section D

VanBeber, Robert Brown -- b. 9-30-1895 d. 11-1-1969

VanBeber, Katherine Pennington -- b. 11-25-1900 d. no date

London Area Cemeteries, Laurel County Kentucky -- A publication of the Laurel County Historical Society -- 1988 -- Page #39.
Note: Katherine Pennington VanBeber died on August 07, 1992
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Isaac VanBibber, Jr. and Elizabeth Hays
Susannah VanBibber and Thomas Hickerson
Melissa Hickerson and Fountain Baker Sampson
Elgiva Sampson and Burr Musick

Musick, Burr d. 4-17-1887
Aged 57 years 13 days

ILLINOIS BEND CEMETERY ADAIR COUNTY, MISSOURI
The Cemeteries of Adair County, Missouri, 1980 -- Adair County Historical Society -- Page #403.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan SAVANNA CITY CEMETERY

Page #73
VanBebber, Clark d. 15 May 1903, aged 59y 10m 11d
Catherine wife of A. C. VanBebber d. 10 July 1882, aged 46y 4m 6d.
Mary Eascer d. 20 Dec 1932

Page #110
VanBibber, Christiana 1848 - 1914

Page #145
VanBibber, Elizabeth 1854 - (2 Apr.) 1934 (2 Apr. 1935) American Legion Gold Star Mother
Information in parenthesis is not on the tombstone, it was added into the book by the author.

Tombstone Inscriptions, Carroll County, Illinois (Savanna Township) -- By Carroll County, Ill., Genealogical Society -- 1980.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan JAMES VAN BIBBER, GENTLEMAN JUSTICE OF KANAWHA COUNTY AND JOHN VAN BIBBER, COMMISSIONER OF REVENUE FOR KANAWHA COUNTY FIRST COUNTY COURT

On the 5th of October, A. D. 1789, the first County Court for the then new county of Kanawha was held. The following "gentlemen justices" were severally sworn and qualified as members of said Court. Thomas Lewis, Rob't Clendennin, Francis Watkins, Charles McClung, Benjamin Strother, William

Clendennin, David Robinson, George Alderson, Leonard Morris, and James Van Bibber.

Thomas Lewis, being the oldest member of the Court, was, by the laws of Virginia, entitled to the Sheriffalty of the county, and was accordingly commissioned as such by the Governor of the Commonwealth, and took the oath required by law Mr. Lewis thereupon appointed John Lewis his deputy.

William H. Cavendish was appointed Clerk of the Court, and was introduced and took the oath of office.

Reuben Slaughter was appointed County Surveyor, and Benjamin Strother, David Robinson, and John Van Bibber were appointed Commissioners of Revenue for the county.

From: West Virginia Statewide Files WV-Footsteps Mailing List WV-FOOTSTEPS-D Digest Volume 99 : Issue 24

The History of West Virginia, Old and New -- Published 1923 -- The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York -- Volume III -- Page #253.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally, Jr.


Graves of Early County Settlers Now Fenced Off
By Jake Siener

A Picturesque landmark of Charleston's early history is the Old Donnally family cemetery at 57th street and Kanawha avenue, S. E.

The site of the cemetery was originally part of the garden of the Old Donnally homestead, erected by Andrew Donnally, Jr., who was born in Fort Donnally, near Lewisburg, Oct. 17, 1778, the son of Colonel Andrew Donnally. Andrew, Jr., died on June 21, 1849. The old homestead was torn down about 50 years ago.

The number of persons buried in the plot has never been determined. Several years ago the Donnally family of Virginia street and Charleston Colonial Dames collaborated in fencing a plot, 30 feet by 60 feet, shown in the accompanying photo.

Only 12 of a large number of tombstones remain. Others, it is believed, were carried away during the years by persons and for reasons unknown. These 12 markers were encased in new concrete bases.

Buried in the plot is Andrew Donnally, Jr., and his wife, who was born in 1781 and died on St. Valentine day, 1850. Others bearing the Donnally name in the plot are Melinda J. Donnally, wife of Andrew F. Donnally, born in 1822, died in 1848; Eliza M. Donnally, wife of Lewis F. Donnally, who died in 1858 at the age of 27 years; James J. Donnally, son of Andrew and Marjery Donnally, who died in 1845, aged 25 years; and Virginia Lewis Donnally, infant daughter of Andrew F. and Lucy W. Donnally.

Colonel Donnally and his wife were buried in a nearby hallow. Their tombstones were destroyed during the Civil war. He was a leader in founding Kanawha county and served as one of its first delegates.

The colonel's son, Andrew, Jr., was the father of 13 children. He built the house at Broad and Kanawha streets, which later became known as the old Goshorn property, site of the new building being erected for United Carbon company, recently known as the Tally Ho tea room.

The oldest grave marked by tombstone is that of Mary Ormiston, wife of James Ormiston. She was born in Kanawha county, Feb. 13, 1809, died April 5, 1839.

Other markers are those of Hannah V. Slaughter, wife of Goodrich Slaughter, born in 1778, died in 1858; Mary Slaughter, wife of Reuben Slaughter, died in 1851 at the age of 81; Mary Eliza Effrey, died 1864, aged 2; and Emily Morton, wife of Moses Morton and daughter of Samuel C. Reed and Maria Reed, who was born in 1840, died in 1868.

The cemetery is situated on the south side of Kanawha avenue, a silent tribute to many pioneer residents who helped pave the way for the city of progress, culture and opportunity that Charleston is today.

The Charleston Daily Mail -- Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia -- March 23, 1941 -- Sunday.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Alphonso D. Boone and Nancy Linville Boone
Jesse VanBibber Boone and Elizabeth Fudge
Van Daniel Boone and Emma Jane Ferr
EUREKA CEMETERY
Boone, Emma Jane (Ferr) 1869 - 1930
Boone, Van Daniel 1859 - 1943
At Rest in Lincoln County -- Published by the Lincoln County Historical Society, Newport, Oregon -- 1979 -- Page #39.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

GENERAL LAND OFFICE RECORDS

The following are land patents for the state of Missouri located on the Bureau of Land Management website. I have added the names of the Van Bibber patentee's parents for identification purposes.

Patentee Name State County Issue Date Parents

Van Bibber, Gabriel J. MO Ray 10/15/1853 Peter VB & Martha Hunt

Van Bibber, Gabriel J. MO Ray 10/15/1853 Peter VB & Martha Hunt

Van Bibber, Isaac MO Montgomery 6/10/1828 Isaac VB & Sarah Davis

Van Bibber, Isaac MO Montgomery 2/11/1832 Isaac VB & Sarah Davis

Van Bibber, James D. MO Greene 6/01/1859 Joseph VB & Susan Boone

Van Bibber, Noah MO Warren 8/02/1852 Solomon VB & Mary Bryson

Van Bibber, Peter MO Ray 10/15/1853 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

Van Bibber, Solomon MO Warren 11/01/1851 Jacob VB & Sarah Miller

Van Bibber, Solomon MO Warren 1/15/1856 Jacob VB & Sarah Miller

Van Bibber, Taylor MO Dallas 4/21/1900 Merritt VB & Mary Axtell

VanBibber, Alphonso MO Montgomery 9/15/1835 Isaac VB & Elizabeth Hays

VanBibber, Alphonso MO Montgomery 9/15/1835 Isaac VB & Elizabeth Hays

VanBibber, Daniel MO Callaway 8/01/1844 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Erwin MO Callaway 10/01/1835 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Erwin MO Pettis 5/01/1857 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Erwin MO Pettis 5/01/1857 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Erwin MO Callaway 10/01/1840 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Isaac MO Bates 1/15/1856 Isaac VB & Elizabeth Hays

VanBibber, Isaac MO Bates 1/15/1856 Isaac VB & Elizabeth Hays

VanBibber, Isaac MO Bates 1/15/1856 Isaac VB & Elizabeth Hays

VanBibber, James MO Ray 10/02/1854 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, James MO Callaway 11/07/1837 Peter VB & Marguery Bounds

VanBibber, James MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, James MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, James MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, James MO Callaway 10/01/1840 James VB & Marguery Bounds

VanBibber, Joseph MO Clinton 1/01/1831 James VB & Jane Irvine

VanBibber, Peter MO Ray 8/02/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, Peter MO Ray 8/02/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, Peter MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, Peter MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, Peter MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, William MO Ray 6/20/1836 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, William MO Ray 6/20/1836 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, William MO Ray 9/07/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBibber, William MO Ray 7/28/1838 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBebber, Gabriel MO Ray 12/01/1858 Peter VB & Martha Hunt

VanBebber, James MO Ray 9/20/1839 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBebber, James MO Ray 9/20/1839 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBebber, William MO Ray 5/01/1843 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

VanBeber, Jacob MO Linn 5/10/1848 Peter VB & Ellinor Van Bibber

VanBeber, Vardaman MO Linn 4/01/1856 Jacob VB & Catherine Guthrie

VanBeber, William MO Ray 5/01/1843 John VB & Margaret Chrisman

Q. What's a land patent?

A. Land patents document the transfer of land ownership from the federal government to individuals. Land patent records include the information recorded when ownership was transferred.

Q. What are public lands?

A. The term public land means any lands and interest which title is still vested in the Federal Government. The Secretary of the Interior through the BLM administers those lands within the several states.

Q. What is the Issue Date?

A. The month, day, and year that the President signed the land document. On this document you will also find signatures of officers or employees of the GLO. Beginning June 17, 1948, the authority was delegated to the Secretary of the Interior to issue patents on public lands.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
Robert VanBeber and Margaret Jane Susong
Frank VanBeber and Sallie Bailey
William Walter VanBeber and Pearl B. Muncey
James W. VanBeber

BURCHETT (TN.) CEMETERY

In Gibson Station, exit US-58 on SR-691 for 2.5 mi. (0.5 mi. into TN.) Cemetery is on right side of road near Mt. Gilead Baptist Church at junction of Wheeler Rd. & Luttrell Hill Rd. Many residents who lived in Lee County near the TN. line are buried in this cemetery.

Submitted by William & Rev. Bruce Johnson; Sep 1997

Van Beber, James W.; 15 Dec 1917 - 8 Mar 1971; h/o Lois S. Van Bebber;
Van Beber, Lois S.; 18 Jul 1928 - living; w/o James Van Beber
Van Beber, Walter W.; 21 May 1894 - 20 Sep 1971; h/o Pearl B. Van Beber;
Van Beber, Pearl B.; 16 Jun 1901 - 26 Oct 1975; w/o Walter W. Van Beber
Frair, Charles Wayne; 15 Dec 1934 - 4 Apr 1993; h/o Audrey Van Beber Friar;
Frair, Audrey Van Beber; 26 Apr 1936 - living; w/o Charles Wayne Friar

Cemeteries of Lee County, Virginia -- by Lee County Historical & Genealogical Society -- 1999 -- Page #863.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Isaac VanBebber and Hannah Long
Robert VanBeber and Margaret Jane Susong
George VanBeber and Martha Ann Pridemore
Ben Morris VanBeber

RESTHAVEN CEMETERY

Ben M. Vanbeber (May 20, 1905 - December 11, 1957)

Located: Park Hill, Corbin, Knox County, Kentucky

Copied by: J.W. Jones, Lissie Jones and Maxine Jones
Knox County, Kentucky Cemeteries Volume V -- Published by Knox County Genealogical Society, Inc. -- 1984 -- Page #5.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Indiana, Warrick County, Boon Township, Boonville City, Ward 4 (ED-147, Page 194 B, Line 79) has the following person in the "Orphan's Home" at 322 Locust Street: Vanbiber, Raymon, white, male, 11 years old, born December 1889 in Indiana, and both parents born in Indiana. His relation to head of the "head of the family" (Matron of Home) appears to read "Dep".
Ten years later on April 15, 1910 in Portsmouth, Virginia, at the U.S. Navy Yard (ED-101, Page 28 A, Line 49), the Census Enumerator recorded the following Sailor in the U.S. Navy: Vanbibber, Ray J., white, male, twenty something years old (hard to read but appears to be 21), born in Indiana and parents born in Indiana. The "head of the family" is reported as William F. Halsey, Jr., 27 years old, who later became Fleet Admiral and famous in WWII as "Bull Halsey".
MY ANSWER TO THE QUESTION.
Raymond J. Van Bibber was the son of William Albert VanBibber and Mary Ann Sutton. William was the son of Isaac VanBibber and Missouri Ann Sutton. It appears all the children of William and Mary were orphaned out. Raymond was living in New Madrid County, Missouri on the 1920 census in the home of Elza and Elizabeth Moser. He is listed as a boarder and his occupation was a tie maker. This is no doubt a railroad tie maker. It states he and his parents were all born in Indiana. I don't ever recall finding him on the 1930 census and I believe someone thought that he had gone to Mexico. I have no further information on him after his recording on the 1920 census.

THIS IS THE BROTHER OF MY MOTHER-IN-LAWS MOTHER
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Isaac VanBebber and Mary Martin
Nancy Malinda VanBebber and Canada Hodge Rogers
Mary Helen Rogers and Squire H. Marcum
James Isaac Marcum and Callie Ann Lane
John Canada Marcum and Clara Bell Jackson
Jimmy Allen Marcum

SP4 - E4 - Army - Selective Service
1st Infantry Division
23 year old Single, Caucasian, Male
Born on Jun 19, 1942
From CONCORD, TENNESSEE
Length of service 1 year.
His tour of duty began on Sep 25, 1965
Casualty was on Feb 04, 1966
SOUTH VIETNAM
HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY
MULTIPLE FRAGMENTATION WOUNDS
Body was recovered
Religion
BAPTIST

Jimmy Marcum was born on June 19, 1942 in Concord, Knox County, Tennessee the son of John Canada Marcum and Clara Bell Jackson. He graduated from Karns High School in Knoxville in 1960. Jimmy was drafted into the United States Army in March 1964. He reported to Vietnam in September 1965 and was killed in action on February 4, 1966. His body was returned to the United States and burial was in Marietta Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.
Aug 22, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan George Lindenburger Van Bibber IV was born on March 12, 1906, in Harford County, Maryland. He was the son of Armfield Franklin Van Bibber (d.1953) and Susanna Rebecca [Michael] Van Bibber (d.1955). He had one brother Edwin M. (d.1967) and two sisters Katherine and Ann (Mrs. William T. Whitney).

Van Bibber was a life-long resident of Bel Air, living at 303 Main Street, his childhood home. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1929 with a degree in architecture and was employed as a draftsman in the Edgewood Arsenal from 1936-1960. His real interests lay however in local history, travel, literature and the cinema. He made numerous trips abroad, culminating in a five-month round-the-world voyage in 1975.

Van Bibber was active in the Harford County Historical Society, serving on its Bicentennial Commission and writing a monograph “Notes on Bel Air - a character sketch of our county seat.” He designed the seal for Harford County and the town seals for Bel Air, Aberdeen and Havre de Grace.

Over the years Van Bibber contributed numerous columns to local newspapers. He wrote “Crazy Horse Spoke” for the News Advertiser and the Havre de Grace Record and “Henry Harf Hath Hearde” published in the Bel Air Aegis. He illustrated his columns with drawings and caricatures.

Van Bibber never married. After the death of his mother in 1955, he began renting rooms in his house to boarders and having all his meals in the restaurants and cafes of Bel Air. This habit ensured that Van Bibber was a familiar personage in the town and his diaries are full of references

to pedestrians or motorists hailing him during his perambulations.

Throughout much of his life Van Bibber was plagued by insomnia and many of the later volumes of his diary record his efforts to occupy the hours of sleeplessness. Many of these hours were spent on the diary itself with its time-consuming transcriptions, amendments, indexing and the like. Indeed it occasionally seems as if the diary were the focus and raison d'etre of Van Bibber's life with many of the elaborations of style, annotations etc. growing out of a need to occupy his thoughts and time. The days were structured by the grooves of habits and patterns repeated over the years but Van Bibber's relatively unfettered and solitary existence was made even more inward-directed and solitary by the regimen of keeping his diary.

Van Bibber also suffered from alcoholism. The gradual progression from the exuberant drinking of a college youth to social drinking as a young adult to dependence and abuse of alcohol in maturity is evident in the pages of the diary -- indeed, there must exist few autobiographical accounts of the disease as meticulous as this one. In 1968 Van Bibber was hospitalized for several weeks in a state of near physical collapse after one particularly severe period of abuse. As a result of this episode, with its attendant warnings of fatality, Van Bibber embarked on a period of abstinence which lasted ten years. He frequented the same familiar cafes and kept the same company without jeopardizing his own resolution.

Van Bibber died on March 26, 1979, after an illness of several weeks.

SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

As will be obvious from the previous pages the most remarkable feature of this collection is the voluminious daily diary kept by Van Bibber from August 1926 to February 1979, the month before his death. The diary occupies 63 chronological volumes (with 7 additional volumes kept by Van Bibber on his travels), totalling approximately 50,000 pages. The format of the diary evolved over the years as Van Bibber refined and modified his system but the commitment to a faithful recording of the minutiae of everyday life never wavered. Not only do the entries capture life's progression of one individual from youth into old age but also they unwittingly preserve a contemporaneous record of the social and technological changes over half a century.

Van Bibber recorded his daily routine from literally the exact time at which he awoke, to his meals, his conversations, mail received and sent, his dreams, what he wore, when he washed his socks or brushed his teeth, what clothes he took to the cleaners, his purchases and financial transactions. He described parties and reported conversations, noted the pieces of classical music broadcast on the radio, summarized the plots of radio and television programs, movies and books, reported the weather and commented on world affairs. When he was travelling, this recording became even more complex with times of departure, descriptions of scenery, hotels, cities, fellow travellers and the like.

Van Bibber began his diary while a student at the University of Virginia. He used old classroom notebooks and wrote in a dense scrawl, completely covering the pages with numerous amendments, additions and marginalia. Van Bibber occasionally made entries in Russian or in

a (seemingly) invented alphabet. Many of the early volumes contain whimsical sketches or architectural drawings.

In 1935 Van Bibber began typing his diary on loose-leaf sheets of paper and binding them into volumes of approximately 1000 pages. With few exceptions, he continued this practice until his death. He kept notes throughout the day and then transferred this information to a typed narrative form. Many of the early volumes contain indexes of those items or events Van Bibber deemed important but in 1947 he refined his system even further by instituting a card index. The subject headings of this card system are listed on pages 12-13 of this register. By far the most voluminous category is “motion pictures” reflecting Van Bibber's enthusiasm for the cinema, but there are also hundreds of cards for “books” and “letters.”

Van Bibber was a poor speller and often wrote in a phonetic style but in 1971 he began using an elaborate and complicated “shorthand” system of his own invention. With the exception of the diary of his round-the-world voyage in 1975, he made entries in this code for the rest of his life. The volumes for the latter years (1974-79) also include Van Bibber's personal correspondence and copies of his replies.

In addition to the diary the collection includes three volumes of poetry written by Van Bibber, the typescript of his monograph “Bel Air - a character sketch of our county seat,” his treatise on English grammar, pronunciation and spelling titled “Wurz the Far at?” and one folder of newspaper clippings and miscellaneous souvenirs.

INTRODUCTION

The Papers of George Lindenburger Van Bibber (1906-1979) were donated to the Maryland Historical Society in April 1979. By the terms of his will, the Society received his diary and the card index system to the diary, his scrapbooks, manuscripts and any unsold sketches. The material was handed over to the Society by John S. Carver, J. Garland Green and Charles H. Reed, named by Van Bibber in his will as his Personal Representatives.

The Gallery of the Society holds Van Bibber's sketches and watercolors. The papers in the Manuscripts Division are restricted for twenty years from date of deposit.
Aug 23, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan The following consists of the early history of Claiborne County, Tennessee, as written by ROBERT P. CARR, Tazewell, TN 1894. I will leave the spelling as it was originally written.

In order to extend this little book a few pages further, I will give a sketch of the earliest settlements in the territory now known as CLAIBORNE County was Fort BUTLER on BALL Creek and a station was also made on Station Creek, for which the creek has ever taken its name. Also another station of whites at YOAKUM Station, in Powell's Valley.

The above mentioned settlements were the first in this country. It will be remembered that people had to live in close settlements and build forts for protection against the Indians. They were often shot down if caught outside their forts. One instance I will relate. In the Station Creek settlement there lived a family by the name of ROBINSON.

One morning soon their horses had strayed away from the fort. One young man of the family (James ROBINSON) went in search of the horses. He was going through a large cane brake, near where the city of ARTHUR now stands. At a large spring he was shot by the Indians. He ran nearly a half mile and fell and expired in a few minutes. He was buried at the place he died and his grave is, to this day, marked, it being more than one hundred and twenty years ago. The spring has ever since been called BUTCHER Spring.

The settlement at Fort BUTLER was once attacked by a large squad of Indians. The whites succeeded in getting them surrounded on a high bluff near the mouth of SYCAMORE and pressed them until they jumped over the cliff and were either killed or drowned. They killed nearly all the enemy. This was a great victory for Fort BUTLER. They were not molested any more for a long time.

The famous CUMBERLAND GAP was a noted passway for whites going from North Carolina and the mother settlement on the WATOUGA to the FRENCH LICK settlement on CUMBERLAND River. This is already mentioned. The first emigrants from WATAUGA to FRENCH LICK floated down the HOLSTON and TENNESSEE Rivers. They were troubled so by the Indians that they were compelled to abandon that route and go by way of Cumberland Gap. They wre conducted through the mountains from Cumberland Gap to HAZEL PATCH, now a station on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, by Daniel BOONE.

There was no roads in them days. They traveled through the dense forests by blazed pathways. It was along this road that the 500 soldiers traveled, under the command of Major EVANS, to relieve the FRENCH LICK settlement. As already stated, it might be of interest to tell you how these soldiers were paid by the FRENCH LICK Settlement. There was a tax levied, which was the first tax known to the State of Tennessee, as follows:

"Thirty shillings was levied to the head of each family, one fourth in venison and bear meat at ten shillings per one hundred pounds, one fourth in corn at four shillings per bushel, one eighth in salt at six-teen dollars per bushel, one eighth in pork at eight dollars per one hundred pounds and one fourth in money. Every man was to deliver his taxes to Major EVANS."

I will state that the first emigrants from WATAUGA to FRENCH LICK numbered about three hundred. They made their journey in the winter of 1779, and it is said that that was the coldest winter that has ever been experienced since that time. As already stated, they floated down the river on flat boars. One family in the crew had small pox. It was necessary to keep them behind far enough for the others to keep out of reach of the contagious disease.

They were attacked by the Indians at HIWASSEE, and, as this family was behind, they were captured. This spread the disease among the Indians and killed them by the hundreds.

CLAIBORNE County was laid out in 1801 and named in honor of W.C.C. CLAIBORNE, one of the first supreme judges of the state and the first representative in congress from Tennessee. The first county court was held at the house of John OWENS, December 7, 1801. The following magistrates were present:
Isaac LANE, Joseph WEBSTER, Wm. TRENT, Jas CHIUM, Abe LENHAM, John WALLEN, Matthew SIMS, John VANBEBBER, Wm. ROGERS, George READ, C. NEWPORT, John CASEY, Joseph NATIONS and James RENFROE.

The oath of office was administered by Andrew EVANS and Joseph COBB, magistrates of GRAINGER County. Isaac LANE was chairman and Walter EVANS clerk.

David ROGERS was first sheriff, but, being unable to give bond, John HUNT, Sr., was elected in his place.

The next term of court was held at the house of John HUNT, who lived where TAZEWELL is now located. The third term of court was held at the house of Elisha WALLEN. It was then that a small frame courthouse was built and it is standing in Tazewell to this day.

The first resident lawyer in Tazewell was Luke BOWYER.

The court appointed commissioners to locate the county site for CLAIBORNE County, Viz: George REED, John VANBIBBER, Matthew SIMS, Abe LENHAM, Jos. WEBSTER, John BULLARD and Silas WILLIAMS.

At that time there was three places contesting for the location. One was OLD TOWN, in Powell's Valley; one at BIG SPRINGS, the other one at RUSSELL's CREEK, the present location.

The committee visited the three places and considered the application and when they visited RUSSELL CREEK they located the site there. At the fork of the MULBERRY GAP and CUMBERLAND GAP roads there was a grocery where whiskey was sold at ten cents a quart. The committee became top heavy and while drunk located the county site on RUSSELL CREEK and went home.

The town of TAZEWELL is now about ninety years old. It has never grown to much magnitute, yet she has held her own and preserved a good name.

In the history of CLAIBORNE County there has only been two hangings for murder. One about sixty years ago, the other about nineteen years ago.

Before the war, it is said TAZEWELL was one of the finest little towns in East Tennessee, but during the war the town almost destroyed by fire, the court house and all other public buildings being entirely consumed. The town has gradually been rebuilt. The town has two splendid brick churches, built about the year 1844. Also a fine brick school building, where there has been a successful school for the past forty years.

TAZEWELL COLLEGE is a chartered institution.

The present court house was built in 1867, by V.H. STURM. There are many modern residences in TAZEWELL, and the present population is about six hundred souls.

Other places of note we might mention are OLD TOWN, PLEASANT, ARTHUR, LONE MOUNTAIN, HAMILTON SPRINGS, CUMBERLAND GAP, SHAWANEE, HARROGATE (where is located the famous FOUR SEASONS HOTEL), BACCHUS, HOOP, CEDAR FORK, RITCHIE, YELLOW SPRINGS, COMPENSATION, SPEEDWELL, SPRINGDALE, etc
Aug 23, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan Subject: Re: Canada H. Rogers d. 15 Jul 1923

Report Speedwell Man Killed in Auto Sunday
Cann Rogers of Speedwell was killed when his car ran out of the road and turned over on the mountain road near Jellico Sunday afternoon, according to reports from there. His neck was broken in the accident and death was instantaneous."


The auto accident victim mentioned below would appear to be Canada H.(odge) Rogers b. 29 May 1880. He died 15 Jul 1923. Jellico, the site of the accident, is in Campbell Co very near the TN-KY state line just west of the current I-75. The area appears to be very mountainous.

This Canada H. Rogers married Nettie N. Shelby. He was the son of Isaac L. Rogers b. 1856 and Parlie Willoughby b.1857. He was no doubt named for his grandfather, Canada Hodge Rogers b. 1826, who married Nancy Malinda Van Bebber b. 1825. This first Canada Hodge Rogers was the youngest son of Major David b. 1779.
Aug 23, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christinia ___________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally Jr.

Colonel Andrew Donnally, Jr. was born in Donnally Fort October 17, 1778, and
died in Kanawha County June 21, 1849. He was a Major in 1802 and Colonel in
1804, and in 1805 was a trustee of the town of Charleston. He was clerk of
the court for many years, justice and sheriff, and represented Kanawha County
in the general assembly in 1836 and 1840. He was a large landholder, as well
as his father, and was one of the pioneer salt manufacturers. The firm of
Ruffner and Donnally at one time practically controlled the salt business of
the Kanawha Valley. The first steamboat to ascend the Kanawha as far as
Charleston was built for Colonel Donnally and Samuel Henderson, his cousin,
inaugurated a Charleston-Cincinnati packet service with the steamboat "Fairy
Queen." Colonel Andrew Donnally, Jr. lived most of his life on the homeplace
on the south side of the Kanawha river, but about 1830 he built and occupied
for a time the brick house which is still standing at the corner of Kanawah
and Broad streets in Charleston. He is buried in the old Donnally burying
ground in Kanawha City. On May 31, 1802, he married Marjorie Van Bibber (1781
- 1850), daughter of Captain John Van Bibber and his wife, Chloe Staniford.
They had besides four children who died in childhood, nine children, Chloe,
Caroline, VanBibber, Dryden, Jane, Andrew F., John J., William and Lewis Fry.

Chloe Donnally, born September 21, 1805 died April 7, 1830, married Henry Fry,
great grandson of Colonel Joshua Fry. They had two children, Marjery Jane Fry
who married Alvin Goshorn. Their living descendants are Harry Snyder of
Charleston, Alban Snyder of Washington, and Rear Admiral C.P. Snyder USN.
Philip Fry married Emily F. Reynolds and had Charles Fry and Kate Fry.

Caroline Donnally, born September 10, 1807, died July 6, 1839, married Colonel
John Lewis, grandson of General Andrew Lewis. They had three sons, Andrew,
James, and John. Their daughter Marjery Lewis married first, Edward Kenna by
whom she had a son, Senator John E. Kenna, and two daughters, and married
second Richard Ashby, and had a son Walter Ashby.

Van Bibber Donnally born August 19, 1800 died in Mason county May 10, 1882,
married Mary Waggoner, October 2, 1832. They had ten children of whom the
following arrived at maturity. Ellen Donnally married Hamilton Morris and had
a son Hamilton Morris, Jr., who married Margaret Bibby. Andrew Van Donnally
who married Hannah English and had five daughters. Nina married Frank
Cornwell, Mary married T.A. Draper, Anna married Forrest Wash, Juliet married
Herbert Wood, and Flora married Henry Brawley. Cornelia Donnally married
Henry Cushman. Charles Donnally moved to Louisa county, Virginia, and married
Bertie Porter and had a son Jessie Donnally and two daughters Mary and Gay.
Belle Donnally was unmarried, Emma Donnally. William Boyd Donnally born 1851,
married Sally Ashton Cotton, 1881, and had the following children: Sadie
Donnally died 1932, married Lester L. Sheets, and had three children, Donnally
Sheets, William Sheets, and Dorothy Sheets; John Cotton Donnally of
Washington, D.C. married Mary Annetta Myers and had Mary Annetta Donnally and
Henrietta Lee Donnally; Boyd Donnally married Charlie Littlepage; Henry F.
Donnally married Erdena McGraw and had Sally Ashton Donnally and Henry
Fitzhugh Donnally, Jr., Fitzhugh Donnally married Ruth Turner and had Fitzhugh
Donnally and Andrew VanBibber Donnally; VanBibber Donnally, Dorothy Donnally
married Robert E.L. Ruffner; Robert Donnally married Isabel Smiley and had
Robert Donnally, Jr.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Henry Van Bibber and Catherine Ann Bougard
James Van Bibber and Anna Laroun
"Isaac Van Bibber" and Ann Chew

Isaac Van Bibber, Baltimore Committee of Correspondence
Letter written by Mr. Samuel Adams

Isaac Van Bibber, a member of the Baltimore committee of correspondence, in response to the British Coercive Acts - the Boston Port Bill and the Boston Tea Party, Tuesday, May 31st, 1774 from the Chronicles of Baltimore:

In consequence of the passage by the British Parliament of the Boston Port Bill--a bill intended to shut out the people of Boston from commercial intercourse with every part of the world--the people of Boston assembled in town-meeting at Fanueil Hall on the 13th day of May, 1774, and voted "that if the other colonies would come into a joint resolution to stop all importations from Great Britain, and every part of the West Indies, till the act blocking up the harbor be repealed, the same will prove the salvation of North America and her liberties." This resolve was transmitted to the people of Baltimore, in a letter written by Mr. Samuel Adams to Mr. Win. Lux, of Baltimore. Mr. Adams said: "The people receive this edict with indignation. It is expected by their enemies, and feared by some of their friends, that this town singly, will not be able to support the cause under so severe a trial. As the very being of every colony, considered as a free people, depends upon the event, a thought so dishonorable to our brethren cannot be entertained, as that this town will now be left to struggle alone. The town of Boston is now suffering the stroke of vengeance, in the common cause of America. I hope they will sustain the blow with a becoming fortitude, and that the effects of this cruel act, intended to intimidate and subdue the spirits of all America, will by the joint efforts of all, be frustrated."

In the Maryland Journal of the 28th of May, 1774, a notice appeared, of which the following is a copy: "On Tuesday last, a few hours after the arrival of an express from Philadelphia relative to the situation of affairs at Boston, a number of merchants and respectable mechanics of this town met at the Court-house, and appointed a committee to correspond with the neighboring colonies, as the exigency of affairs may make it occasionally necessary."

This committee was Robert Alexander, Robert Christie, Sr., Isaac Van Bibber, Thomas Harrison, John Boyd, Samuel Purviance, Jr., Andrew Buchanan, Wm. Buchanan, John Moale, Wm. Smith, Win. Lux, and John Smith. They met at the Court-house on Tuesday, May 31st, 1774, Captain Charles Ridgely acting as chairman.

-The Chronicles of Baltimore; being a complete history of "Baltimore Town" by John Thomas Scharf; Published: Baltimore, Turnbull Bros., 1874

NOTE; A committee of correspondence was organized by the local governments of the American colonies to coordinate communication outside of the colony. These served an important role in the American Revolution. The committees of correspondence rallied opposition on common causes, and so the committees were the beginning of a formal political union among the colonies. The First Continental Congress convened in Philadelphia September 5, 1774
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ____________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Alethea Reynolds and James Clark McFarland
Miriam McFarland and James Orville Grant

"James C. McFarland, son of James Clark McFarland and Abigail Kimball, was
born at Haverhill, Massachusetts, October 1, 1792, and removed to Marietta,
Ohio, in June, 1803, where his father then resided. His first wife was Lethe,
daughter of Major John Reynolds, whom he married May 20, 1819. His second
wife was Dulce, daughter of Rev. Calvin Chaddock, married January 4, 1824.
Third wife, Lucy W. Greenhow, married in Richmond, Virginia, March 8, 1828.
Fourth wife, Mrs. Maria Broome, married April 3, 1847."

By his first marriage he had one daughter, who married Dr. James Orville
Grant, both whom are dead. By his second wife he had one daughter, the wife
of Major A.T. Laidley, of this city. He had four children by this third
marriage, two of whom survived him---Mrs. N.K. Cecil, of Wheeling, and Mrs.
Dr. Houser, of this place; the fourth child died in infancy. He had no
children by his fourth marriage. His son, by his third wife, was the late
Rev. James Robert McFarland, a graduate of Brown University, Cambridge,
Massachusetts, who studied for the ministry, and at the time of his death,
April 4, 1859, was the pastor of a Unitarian Church in Charleston, South
Carolina. His fourth wife survived him, and died in this city July 25, 1874.
Mr. McFarland died here November 9, 1864, in the seventy-third year of his
age.

Few men of our time bore a more excellent character than the subject of this
sketch. He came to Kanawha in the year 1813, and at a period when this county
may be said to have been in flush times, for it was in those years that salt
was money, generally commanding one dollar per bushel. This youthful
adventurer, to the then Eldorado of the West, left his home in Marietta to
seek his fortune.

The Will of James Clark McFarland can be viewed at:
[external link]~wvkanawh/Wills/mcfarland.html
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Henry Van Bibber and Catherine Ann Bougard
James Van Bibber and Anna Laroun
Isaac Van Bibber and Ann Chew
Washington Van Bibber and Lucretia Emory
Isaac Van Bibber and Hannah Catherine Archer
George Lindenberger VanBibber and Hannah Catherine Archer
George Lindenberger VanBibber, Jr. and Adeline Franklin
Harriet Lewis VanBibber and James Alexis Shriver

In the National Register Listings in Maryland is the Olney Farm's main building, a 2 1/2-story brick house generally called "the mansion" at 1001 Old Joppa Road, Joppa, Harford County, Maryland, which includes the c. 1815 paneling removed from the Isaac Van Bibber, Thames Street house in Fells Point, Baltimore.
It also includes the marble Ionic portico from William Small's c. 1830 Baltimore Athenaeum at Charles and Franklin Streets, Baltimore, and a marble bas-relief plaque designed by Pierre L'Enfant for Robert Morris's great 1795 house in Philadelphia.

Begun in 1810 as a typical five-bay, Flemish bond, center-hall "I" house and continuously dynamic for six generations, this house was evolved into a museum of Maryland architecture incorporating a c. 1850 formal parlor across the rear (east) and a summer kitchen to the south off the 1810 kitchen. These relatively ordinary shells have been embellished by high-style additions salvaged from demolished buildings in Baltimore and Philadelphia.

Isaac Van Bibber was born 25 Feb 1735/36 in Cecil Co., MD and died 21 Apr 1825. He married Ann Chew on 27 Nov 1768 in Cecil Co., MD, the daughter of Benjamin Chew IV and Sarah Bond.

J. Alexis Shriver (1872-1951), a man prominent in local and state historical and agricultural matters who lived at Olney from 1890 until his death, installed at Olney a remarkable collection of material saved from historic buildings in the region. These rescued bit are all that remain of these fine buildings and have turned Olney into a living museum of the building art.

In his waning years, Shriver devoted his time mostly to placement of road markers and writing short articles for local papers. He died at his residence, Olney, at age 79 on February 6, 1951 survived by his wife, Harriet Van Bibber Shriver.

The Maryland Historical Society holds the J. Alexis Shriver Papers
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
Peter VanBebber and Elinor VanBibber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Calvin VanBebber and Barthena A. VanBebber
William Franklin VanBebber and Eliza Ramsey
Harry F. Van Bebber and Hattie Ival Bunch
Harry Kenneth Van Bebber

Van Bebber, Harry Kenneth, born 7 March 1921, to Harry Francis & Hattie Ival Bunch Van Bebber, 119 West Wabash, Eureka, CA,

FORMER NROTC INSTRUCTOR HERE KILLED IN CRASH

M/Sgt. Kenneth H. Van Bebber, USMC, formerly an instructor in NROTC at Iowa State College, died on Aug. 2 as a result of an automobile accident near Fillmore, Utah on Aug. 1.

The Van Bebber family had lived here two years. He and his wife and daughter, Doris Ann, 7, had lived at Pammel Ct.

The family had been on their way west to Camp Pendleton, Calif., where M/Sgt. Van Bebber had been transferred. Following the accident, he was taken to Veterans hospital in Salt Lake where he died the next day. Mrs. Van Bebber and daughter were reportedly not seriously injured.

Burial was on Aug 9 in Arlington National cemetery, Va. Mrs. Van Bebber’s home address is given as 1902 Front St. Charleston, W. Va.

Ames Daily Tribune, Ames, Iowa, August 13, 1955

VAN BEBBER, KENNETH HENRY
M/Sgt USMC
Veteran service dates: Unknown
Date of birth: 03/07/1921
Date of death: 08/02/1955
Date of Interment: 08/09/1955
Buried at: Section 33 Site 10852
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan JACON VAN BIBBER:
On August 18, 1861, Jacob enlisted in the Confederate States Army at Greenville, Hunt County, Texas. He served in Company C, 27th Texas Cavalry. This unit was also called 1st Texas Legion or Whitfield's Legion. In September 1862, Jacob's unit participated in the Battle of Iuka, Mississippi. It is this battle where Jacob was wounded, receiving a wound to his right thigh and across the head. He was left in the hands of the enemy where he was hospitalized and later paroled. It appears Jacob later joined a unit from Tennessee, was captured at Clifton, Tennessee and held prisoner at Alton, Illinois. This was the first part of April 1864. He was then taken to City Point Landing on the James River below Richmond, Virginia, where he was exchanged in April 1865. He was ordered to the command of General Tom Whitfield in Columbia, Tennessee. He was sent to Hardin County, Tennessee for furlough (most likely to check on his wife and son) and the war closed before he could get back to his command. All the above information is in his pension application. After the war, Jacob and his family lived in Oak Hill, Hardin Co., Tenn.
He and Evaline Abagail Alexander, were married sometime around 1863 because their oldest son, Robert Newton Van Bibber, was born about 1864. The 1900 census states they were married for 37 years. Jacob and Evaline would have three children; Robert Newton, Charles and Minnie. Robert married Mattie Wells and settled in Alcorn Co., Miss. which is just right across the border from Hardin Co., Tenn. Charles died young and Minnie married James R. Gant.
He first applied for a Confederate pension in 1902 and it was never approved. In November 1914, Jacob wrote a letter asking for information regarding his second Application #6482 which was submitted in October 1912. Jacob stated he was 84 years old, "broken down," and could not support himself.

In a letter dated September 14, 1915 to Jacob Van Bibber, stating that his war record showed that he had enlisted in 1861; afterwards captured at Clifton, Tennessee in 1863 and sent to prison at Alton, Illinois, where he took the oath in 1864. "Under these statements of facts you are certainly not pensionable, unless it can be clearly shown that at the time you took the oath you were unable for service and remained so until the close of the war."
In a letter from Jacob Van Bibber dated September 9, 1920 he stated he was an old Confederate Soldier, age 94 years. He wanted his case reviewed and he to be advised. Jacob received a letter from Ernest N. Haston, Secretary of State for the state of Tennessee, dated July 26, 1927, advising him that his application for a CSA pension had been approved. I guess they got tired of dealing with Jacob and figured at the age of 98 years he couldn't live that much longer.
Jacob lived to be a ripe old age of 100 yrs, 5 mos, and 1 day at the time of his death which occurred on July 15, 1929. Him and his wife are buried in New Harmony Cemetery, Hardin Co., TN.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
John VanBebber and Margaret Chrisman
Nancy VanBebber and William Renfro
John Renfro and Elizabeth Wilds

Children: William Renfro
Nancy Renfro

Renfro, William, son of J. & E., d. Sept. 29, 1847 -
aged 2 yr., 11 mo., 5 da.
Renfro, Nancy, dau. of J. & E., d. Sept. 1, 1847 -
aged 1 yr., 6 mo., 13 da.

Cemetery Records of Ray County, Missouri, Volume #1
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
Ellinor VanBibber and Peter VanBebber
Jacob VanBebber and Catherine Ann Guthrie
Vardeman VanBebber and Elenore Francis Dodson
Lucy Jane VanBebber and John W. Bennett
Edna E. Bennett and Mike A. Arrington

Bennett, John W. Dec. 11, 1853 - Jan. 20, 1943
Bennett, Lucy J. Aug. 29, 1853 - May 1, 1917
Arrington, Dr. Mike A. 1887 - 1959
Arrington, Edna E. 1885 - 1960

Rose Hill Cemetery, Brookfield, Linn County, Missouri
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Elizabeth VanBebber and Anderson Rogers

Rogers: E., July 27, 1811 - Jan. 26, 1889
A., Aug. 17, 1811 - Jan. 13, 1883

Meyers Cemetery - Located nine miles southeast of Butler, Missouri.
Cemetery Records of Bates County, Missouri, Volume #1
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan KNOXVILLE CITIZEN DIES

Joseph Campbell, one of the oldest citizens of Knoxville community, died,
Saturday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Henry Kincaid, and Mr.
Kincaid. He was a native of Ray County, born June 19, 1839, and was 88 years
of age. Mr. Campbell was a fine character and his friends regret to learn of
his death.
Interment was in the VanBebber cemetery, Sunday afternoon, funeral services
being conducted by Eld. G.E. Higdon, of this city, who had known him for many
years.
NOTE:
1. Joseph Campbell married Julia Ann VanBebber on February 24, 1866 in Ray
County, Missouri.
2. Joseph Campbell was the son of Jeremiah Campbell and Elizabeth Vanderpool.
3. Joseph Campbell (19 Jun 1839 - 18 Dec 1927) is buried in VanBebber
cemetery, Ray Co., Mo.
4. Julia VanBebber Campbell (12 May 1846 - 28 Jan 1929) is buried in VanBebber
cemetery, Ray Co., Mo.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Minerva S. Boone and Wynkoop Warner

MINERVA S. BOONE
Wife of WYNKOOP WARNER
BORN July 28, 1799
DIED Jan. 12, 1850
Location: Rose Hill Cemetery, Weston, Platte County, Missouri
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Sarah Davis
James VanBebber, Sr. and Hannah Hoover
Hannah VanBebber and James G. Owens
Isaac Asbury Owens and Susannah Henderson
James Grant Owens and Anna Lee Moore

Owens, Anna Lee b. Aug. 23, 1863 d. Jan. 9, 1944
Owens, James Grant b. Dec. 8, 1863 d. Jan. 10, 1941

Cemeteries of Greene County, Illinois
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Miriam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Minerva B. Reynolds and Philip Garland Todd
Aletha E. Todd and Richard Ellis Putney Jr.
Annette Todd Putney and Otis Adonijah Thayer
Annette May Thayer and Stuart W. Walker
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Born in Malden, W. Va.
Wife of Stuart W. Walker.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Descendant of:
Capt. Abel Thayer, Capt. Bernard Todd, John Van Bibber and William Pollard AS FOLLOWS:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1. Otis A. Thayer (1835-1900)
m. 1864 Anette Putney (b. 1844)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
2. Job Thayer (1782-1857)
m. 1810 Fannie Taylor (1790-1857)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Richard Ellis Putney (1818-95)
m. 1840 Alethea Todd (1824-97)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
3. Abel Thayer
m. 1760 Dorothy Curtis
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Philip Garland Todd (1795-1830)
m. Minerva Reynolds (1803-36)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
4. Bernard Todd
m. 1780 Elizabeth Pollard (d. 1814)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
John Reynolds
m. Miriam Van Bibber (1781-1851)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
5. John Van Bibber
m. Chloe Standford
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William Pollard
m. 1763 Mary Anderson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Abel Thayer (1741-1805)
Served as Lieutenant at the Lexington Alarm and as Captain under Col. John Fellows in the defense of Boston. He was born in Braintree, died in Williamsburg, Mass.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bernard Todd (1750-1814)
Was captain in King and Queen County militia,
Virginia Line. He was born in King and Queen County died in CharlotteCounty Va.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
John Van Bibber (1740-1820)
Served as Private at the battle of Point Pleasant in Brig. Gen. Andrew Lewis'division. He was born in Cecil County, Md. died in Charleston, W. Va.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
William Pollard
Was county clerk in Hanover County, Virginia. He was born, 1734, in King and Queen County died in Hanover Co., Va.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Annette May Thayer married Stuart W. Walker on October 4, 1893 in Charleston, Kanawha Co. WV. Marriage Book #2, Page #316.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Annette Thayer Walker (31 Aug 1871 - 17 Jan 1961) and Stuart W. Walker (1863 - 1923) are both buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, Charleston, Kanawha Co., WV.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stuart and Annette can be located on the 1900 -1920 census records of Berkeley Co., WV. Stuart was an Attorney at Law and they lived in Martinsburg City. The 1910 census indicates they had no children.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan THOMAS COLLIER

born: 1824, Pope Co, IL
Father: John Collier, born NC in 1761, died 1833 age 72
Grandfather: John Collier, of Irish descent, Revolutionary War soldier, had family of 7 sons
Mother: Elizabeth Pitchford, md. 1818 in Pope Co, IL Territory, died 1837
married: 1861, Margaret Hogg, dau of Joseh and Keziah (Derman) Vaughn, born 28 May 1834, Pope Co, IL
Children:
Mary C., wife of Green VanBibber, died Mar 1892; David; Aseneth, widow of John Asbell; James; John W.; 6 more deceased
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christinia ___________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Marjory VanBibber and Andrew Donnally
Caroline Donnally and John Lewis
Margery Lewis and Richard J. Ashby
Walter Lewis Ashby

Hon. Walter Lewis Ashby, a member of the Charleston bar, is senior of the well
known law firm of Ashby & Woodroe, and is associated in business with E.T.
Crawford, the firm name being Crawford & Ashby. He is prominent in poltics,
and in 1898 was elected a member of the state senate of West Virginia. He was
born November 3, 1862, in Norborn County, Mo., and accompanied his parents to
Boone County, W.Va., in 1865, and four years later to Kanawha County.

Walter L. Ashby attended the public schools at Charleston and subsequently
Rock Hill College, Maryland. After deciding upon the study of law, he entered
the office of his half-brother, the late Senator John E. Kenna, and was
admitted to the bar, January 30, 1885. A short time afterward Mr. Ashby
entered into partnership with Hon. C.C. Watts, who was later attorney-general
of West Virginia, with whom he was associated until 1900. Since then Mr. Ashby
has practiced alone and also with partners, his present firm having been
established in 1905. Public matters have interested Mr. Ashby ever since he
attained manhood, when he identified himself with the Democratic party, and
through that medium has been tendered public positions. While serving as state
senator he was a member of committees that had much to do with important
legislation, and on account of his legal ability he was extremely valuable in
that position. He is one of the representative citizens of Charleston, where
he has invested in property and for the past twenty-five years has identified
himself with the leading interests of the city.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ______________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna ______________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Mariam VanBibber and John Reynolds
Minerva B. Reynolds and Philip Garland Todd
Aletha Elizabeth Todd and Richard Ellis Putney Jr.
Aletha "Lillie" A. Putney and Joseph N. Alderson Sr.
Joseph N. Alderson Jr.

The subject of this sketch, the present postmaster of Alderson, is the seventh
in descent from John Alderson, the founder of the town of Alderson. Joseph N.
Alderson, Sr., a well known merchant of the place, was the son of John
Marshall and Cornelia (Coleman) Alderson. He was born February 20, 1848, and
died August 10, 1901. His wife was Lillie Putney, daughter of Richard Putney,
of Kanawha county, whom he married October 20, 1875. Their children were:
James Moseley (deceased); Joseph N. Alderson, Jr., Aletha Todd Alderson, and
Marshall Putney Alderson (deceased).

Joseph N. Alderson, Jr. was born June 8, 1887, and was educated and reared in
the town of his birth. On February 14, 1911, he married Miss Frances
Richardson, daughter of William Richardson, of Huntington. To this union were
born Frances Aletha and Alice Todd Alderson.

Mr. Alderson has been a successful merchant and business man in Alderson and
was connected with the First National Bank of that place for several years.
He has been postmaster of Alderson since February 19, 1914.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Chloe VanBibber and Jesse Bryan Boone
Harriet Morgan Boone and Hiram Howell Baber
Jesse Boone Baber and Martha Louise Dunica


Mrs. Louise Baber, relict of the late Captain Jesse Baber, died at the home of her son, G.K. Baber, near Ham's Prairie, Friday morning at 6 o'clock of senile debility, aged eighty-three years. Her husband, Captain Baber, was a grandson of Daniel Boone, and was for many years steamboat captain on a packet line running on the Missouri river between St. Joseph and St. Louis.

The deceased was a native Missourian, having been born and raised in Cole county. Two sons, G.K. Baber, of Ham's Prairie, and Huber Baber of Jefferson City survive her.

The interment took place in Jefferson City Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock.

The Fulton Sun -- Fulton, Callaway County, Missouri -- January 3, 1905 -- Tuesday -- Page #3 -- Column #2.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina _________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Margery VanBibber and Andrew Donnally Jr.
William Howard Donnally and Margaret Catherine Wood
Maude Ann Donnally and Albert Barnes Lewis

Albert Barnes Lewis was four years old when his parents, D.J. and Mary Jane
Lewis, settled in Coalsmouth. He was educated in
local schools including Shelton. He served as a member of City Council and seemed to have the citizens' support except on a motion he made in 1891 to move the lamp at the Town Hall spring since it was on private property. In 1893 he served as Mayor and President of the School Board composed of members of City Council.
A.B. was president of the St. Albans Art Glass Co. and area agent for Dannett and Pell, Lumber Merchants of NY who specialized in mahogany, walnut and cherry. A.B. named on of his sons for Charles E. Pell.
In 1887, he married Maude Ann Donnally 1865-1911, daughter of William and Margaret Donnally (The Rev. C.M. Campbell, Rector of St. Mark's Episcopal Church performed the ceremony which was held "at the house with a large company present". Both Maude and A.B. were communicants of St. Mark's. They had three sons: Charles Pell 1890-1957; A.B., Jr. 1891-1892; and William Donnally 1894-1952.
In 1897, the family, including "Granny" Donnally, Lizzie, and Wirt Donnally,
Maude's mother, sister and brother, moved to Charleston. The house on Kanawha
St. (now Blvd) had beautiful woodwork including mahogany wainscoting in the dining room. A.B. entertained his grandchildren for hours with tales of growing up in St. Albans. He was pleased when the family moved back to the Lewis home there.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Peter VanBibber, Jr. and Marguery Bounds
John Jesse VanBibber and Rachel Greenlee
Elizabeth VanBibber and Joseph Smith
James Smith and Ann Sayre
Serepta Jane Smith and Lewis Edgar Riffle

Lewis E. Riffle is a son of William and Jane Riffle, who are mentioned in another part of this book. September 11, 1843, is the date of his birth which took place in Mason county, W. Va., the scene of his subsequent life. He remained with his father until he was twenty-six years of age, when he branched out for himself. August 4, 1868, he led to the altar Sarepta Jane Smith, daughter of James and Ann Smith. Their marriage has been a happy one and their home has been blessed with the following named children: John C. and William G. (twins) Cora M., Thomas B., Isaac M., Nellie J., Elizabeth, Emeline E., Alfred C., James G., Henry J. and David B. Mr. Riffle when first married lived on a farm in Cologne district, but after remaining there for about twelve years, he moved to Union district in Mason county, where he located on a small farm, containing the Entsminger flouring mills. He purchased a half interest in this mill in partnership with D.G. Decker. Since that time they have built a new mill, and now do most of the custom work for the surrounding country. Mr. Riffle and his brother-in-law, W.W. Smith first purchased a two-thirds interest of the Entsminger mill, of Clark Tillis. Two years afterward, Smith & Tillis sold to D.G. Decker, and in this way Riffle & Decker became partners in the milling business. The same firm is also in partnership in the running of a portable saw-mill. Mr. Riffle served in the "old Thirteenth" regiment during the war, having enlisted September 9, 1862. He participated with his regiment in many skirmishes and a number of important battles, of which the following may be mentioned: First and second Winchester, Halltown, Berryville, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. Though a carpenter and millwright by trade, Mr. Riffle's principal occupation has been that of farming. He is an energetic, industrious and useful citizen.

History of the Great Kanawha Valley -- First Printing 1891, Second Printing 1994 -- Gauley & New River Publishing Co., P.O. 101, Gauley Bridge, WV 25085 -- Pages #109 & 110.
Aug 24, 2005 · Reply
Bev Gillihan IDENTIFICATION:
Isaac VanBibber and Hester Op den Graeff
Jacob Isaacs VanBibber and Christina ____________
Isaac Jacobs VanBibber and Frances Schumacher
Peter VanBibber and Anna _____________
John VanBibber and Chloe Staniford
Hannah VanBibber and Goodrich Lightfoot Slaughter
Catherine Grizzage Slaughter and Levi Welch
This worthy citizen of Kanawha, at the time of is death, more than a quarter
of a century ago, was among the oldest inhabitants. He was born in Washington
county, Pennsylvania, near the border of the borough of Washington, and with
his father's family came to Charleston at an early age.

Levi Welch was not only the oldest in years and residence, but the most
prominent merchant and man of business in Charleston. In the language of an
obituary notice of Mr. Welch, he possessed a mind of extraordinary strength,
quickness and vigor; he could seize and comprehend at a glance what in most
men would require much mental skill and labor. No man enjoyed in a greater
degree the respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens, nor was their
confidence misplaced. In all his various mercantile and financial
transactions, his accuracy was proverbial, while his integrity, promptitude
and fidelity were alike conspicuous and honorable.

Mr. Welch was a resident of Charleston for many years, but later in life lived
in the Salines, where he was either employed in merchandising, manufacturing
salt, or as chief manager of the business of some of the companies engaged in
the purchase, shipment and sale of salt. At that day the monopolies in the
slat business were large concerns, and required the very best accountants and
clerks. In the capacity of book keeper, cashier and accountant, Mr. Welch
excelled; indeed, his place could not be supplied, and his management was
essential to the success of his employers. The loss of such a man was deeply
felt. During the prevalence of the cholera in this county, he took disease,
and died on the 23rd of August, 1849, in the 65th year of his age, leaving a
large family, many of his descendants still residing in Kanawha. He married,
about the year 1821, a daughter of the late Goodrich Slaughter, one of the
earlier settlers of this county, who was connected with the more prominent
families of the Valley. His widow still survives, in apparent vigorous
health, and is likely to outlive many of her children.
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