CarolE. Basile

AncientFaces Member since Jul 29, 2015

Researching: Thompson, Sharp, Campbell, Spence, Hollingshead, Shropshire, Tribbett

CarolE.'s Photos

Brothers Walter Sharp & Carl W. Sharp US Navy WWII
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A photo of Carl W. Sharp laken in Scotland when on leave during WWII
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A photo of Blanche Harris Spence Sharp, Mother in Law of Jeannette Tribbett Campbell Sharp
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Roland B. and Blanche H. Sharp, Mom Mom & Pop Pop Sharp, Leesburg, New Jersey in 1955. Rolland Butcher Sharp was the son of Robert Nelson Sharp Jr. & Almira Carlisle. Blanche Harris(Spence) Sharp was the daughter of Walter Spence & Olive Thompson of Heislerville, New Jersey. Rolland & BlancheSharp had three sons, Walter Sharp, Carl W. Sharp & Clifford N. Sharp.
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A photo of the Sharp Brothers in Mauricetown, New Jersey. Pictured: Reubin, Albert, Emily, Peter, Enoch, John, and Ouffreld (?) Sharp.
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A photo of Jeannette Tribbette Campbell Sharp taken in New Jersey in 1944.
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A photo of Carl W. Sharp during WWII. Taken in 1944 when he was in the Navy.
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Thomas Shropshire born July 06, 1809, died June 02, 1882 and wife Sarah Fox/Shropshire born Aug.14, 1814, died Jan. 18, 1892. Thomas married Sarah Fox on Jan. 01, 1834. Their children were: Caroline, Mary Jane, George, Anna Eliza, Thomas Jr., Lucy, Charles B., Ellen,and Sarah. Thomas was a Lighthouse Keeper. Thomas Shropshire was appointed as Keeper of Egg Island Lighthouse on May 20, 1871, and remained there in that position until he resigned on July 10, 1880. He was replaced on July 10 by his son, Acting Keeper George Shropshire. George became the official Keeper on October 8, 1880. ( Information was gathered by Jim Gowdy, from resources in the Washington DC Archives. Mr Gowdy is the author of the book "Guiding Lights of the Delaware River and Bay".)
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CarolE.'s Discussion Posts

CarolE. Basile Yes, they both survived.
Aug 01, 2014 · posted to the photo Walter & Carl W. Sharp
CarolE. Basile My Daddy Carl W. Sharp was present for the Normandy invasion. This is the ship on which he was Chief Carpenter's Mate in WWII. USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) Name: USS Dorothea L. Dix Namesake: Dorothea Dix Builder: Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts Launched: 22 June 1940 Acquired: 13 September 1942 Commissioned: 17 September 1942 Decommissioned: 24 April 1946 Honors and awards: 5 battle stars (World War II) Fate: Unknown General characteristics Type: Type C3 class ship Displacement: 11,625 long tons (11,812 t) Length: 473 ft (144 m) Beam: 66 ft (20 m) Draft: 22 ft 6 in (6.86 m) Speed: 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) Complement: 422 officers and enlisted Armament: • 1 × 4 in (100 mm) gun • 4 × 3 in (76 mm) guns USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) was a transport ship of the United States Navy named for Dorothea Dix (1802–1887). Dorothea L. Dix was launched on 22 June 1940 as Exemplar by Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Miss P. J. Kalloch; transferred to the Navy on 13 September 1942; and commissioned on 17 September 1942, Captain L. B. Schulten in command. Contents 1 Service history 1.1 Mediterranean, 1942–1943 1.2 Normandy landings, 1944 1.3 Mediterranean, 1944 1.4 Pacific, 1945–1946 Service history Mediterranean, 1942–1943 Putting to sea from Cove Point, Maryland, on 23 October 1942, Dorothea L. Dix sailed with Task Force 34 (TF 34) to land Army troops and supply scout boats in the assault at Safi, French Morocco, from 8 to 12 November, during "Operation Torch". She returned to Norfolk on 24 November. Between 12 December 1942 and 5 April 1943 she made two more transatlantic voyages to Oran, Algeria, carrying Army troops and nurses. After amphibious training at Norfolk, she sailed on 8 June 1943 for Oran, arriving on 22 June. On 5 July she got underway for the invasion of Sicily, arriving off Scoglitti late on 9 July and debarking her troops and cargo early the next day under heavy air attack. She embarked wounded and one Italian prisoner and returned to Oran on 15 July. A week later she was en route to New York, arriving on 3 August to debark her passengers, German prisoners of war. A similar voyage was made to Oran between 21 August and 21 September after which she sailed on 8 October for the United Kingdom. Dorothea L. Dix arrived at Gourock Bay, Scotland, on 17 October 1943, and sailed ten days later for Algiers where she exchanged troops for 243 survivors of Beatty (DD-640) and for Oran to embark Army troops. She unloaded cargo at Gourock Bay between 24 and 30 November then sailed to New York, arriving on 11 December. Between 29 December 1943 and 10 March 1944 she carried troops on two voyages from New York to Gourock Bay and Liverpool. Normandy landings, 1944 On 23 March 1944 Dorothea L. Dix sailed from New York for Belfast, Northern Ireland, arriving on 3 April. After amphibious training in the Clyde area, she sortied with Temporary Transport Division 97 from the Isle of Portland, England, on 5 June for the invasion landings at Normandy the following day. She returned to Weymouth Bay on the 7th to debark casualties, then embarked troops in the Clyde area and tanks at Avonmouth which she carried to Naples, arriving on 16 July. Mediterranean, 1944 She put out from Naples on 13 August 1944 for the invasion of southern France two days later, unloading tanks and Army troops for the assault landings. She continued to support this operation by carrying French, British, and Italian as well as American troops to Baie de la Cavalaire and Marseilles from Naples and Oran until 22 October. Three days later she left Oran for New York, arriving on 8 November. Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) at anchor, c. 1945, place unknown. Pacific, 1945–1946 Dorothea L. Dix put to sea from New York on 18 December 1944, and arrived at San Francisco on 4 January 1945. Two weeks later she sailed to carry Army troops to Pearl Harbor, returning to San Francisco on 2 February. After a voyage to Attu, to transport Army troops to Aleutian Islands she proceeded to Okinawa arriving on 1 May. Here she landed support troops and embarked casualties and naval passengers for San Francisco, arriving on 27 May. Between 10 June 1945 and 9 February 1946 Dorothea L. Dix operated on transport duty from San Francisco and other west coast ports to the Philippines, carrying replacements to the Pacific and returning veterans. She sailed to New York on 29 March 1946, was decommissioned there on 24 April 1946, and returned to the Maritime Commission for disposal the same day. Awards Dorothea L. Dix received five battle stars for World War II service.
Jun 06, 2014 · posted to the photo Carl W. Sharp WWII
CarolE. Basile My Daddy Carl W. Sharp was present for the Normandy invasion. This is the ship on which he was Chief Carpenter's Mate in WWII. USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) Name: USS Dorothea L. Dix Namesake: Dorothea Dix Builder: Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts Launched: 22 June 1940 Acquired: 13 September 1942 Commissioned: 17 September 1942 Decommissioned: 24 April 1946 Honors and awards: 5 battle stars (World War II) Fate: Unknown General characteristics Type: Type C3 class ship Displacement: 11,625 long tons (11,812 t) Length: 473 ft (144 m) Beam: 66 ft (20 m) Draft: 22 ft 6 in (6.86 m) Speed: 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) Complement: 422 officers and enlisted Armament: • 1 × 4 in (100 mm) gun • 4 × 3 in (76 mm) guns USS Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) was a transport ship of the United States Navy named for Dorothea Dix (1802–1887). Dorothea L. Dix was launched on 22 June 1940 as Exemplar by Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Miss P. J. Kalloch; transferred to the Navy on 13 September 1942; and commissioned on 17 September 1942, Captain L. B. Schulten in command. Contents 1 Service history 1.1 Mediterranean, 1942–1943 1.2 Normandy landings, 1944 1.3 Mediterranean, 1944 1.4 Pacific, 1945–1946 Service history Mediterranean, 1942–1943 Putting to sea from Cove Point, Maryland, on 23 October 1942, Dorothea L. Dix sailed with Task Force 34 (TF 34) to land Army troops and supply scout boats in the assault at Safi, French Morocco, from 8 to 12 November, during "Operation Torch". She returned to Norfolk on 24 November. Between 12 December 1942 and 5 April 1943 she made two more transatlantic voyages to Oran, Algeria, carrying Army troops and nurses. After amphibious training at Norfolk, she sailed on 8 June 1943 for Oran, arriving on 22 June. On 5 July she got underway for the invasion of Sicily, arriving off Scoglitti late on 9 July and debarking her troops and cargo early the next day under heavy air attack. She embarked wounded and one Italian prisoner and returned to Oran on 15 July. A week later she was en route to New York, arriving on 3 August to debark her passengers, German prisoners of war. A similar voyage was made to Oran between 21 August and 21 September after which she sailed on 8 October for the United Kingdom. Dorothea L. Dix arrived at Gourock Bay, Scotland, on 17 October 1943, and sailed ten days later for Algiers where she exchanged troops for 243 survivors of Beatty (DD-640) and for Oran to embark Army troops. She unloaded cargo at Gourock Bay between 24 and 30 November then sailed to New York, arriving on 11 December. Between 29 December 1943 and 10 March 1944 she carried troops on two voyages from New York to Gourock Bay and Liverpool. Normandy landings, 1944 On 23 March 1944 Dorothea L. Dix sailed from New York for Belfast, Northern Ireland, arriving on 3 April. After amphibious training in the Clyde area, she sortied with Temporary Transport Division 97 from the Isle of Portland, England, on 5 June for the invasion landings at Normandy the following day. She returned to Weymouth Bay on the 7th to debark casualties, then embarked troops in the Clyde area and tanks at Avonmouth which she carried to Naples, arriving on 16 July. Mediterranean, 1944 She put out from Naples on 13 August 1944 for the invasion of southern France two days later, unloading tanks and Army troops for the assault landings. She continued to support this operation by carrying French, British, and Italian as well as American troops to Baie de la Cavalaire and Marseilles from Naples and Oran until 22 October. Three days later she left Oran for New York, arriving on 8 November. Dorothea L. Dix (AP-67) at anchor, c. 1945, place unknown. Pacific, 1945–1946 Dorothea L. Dix put to sea from New York on 18 December 1944, and arrived at San Francisco on 4 January 1945. Two weeks later she sailed to carry Army troops to Pearl Harbor, returning to San Francisco on 2 February. After a voyage to Attu, to transport Army troops to Aleutian Islands she proceeded to Okinawa arriving on 1 May. Here she landed support troops and embarked casualties and naval passengers for San Francisco, arriving on 27 May. Between 10 June 1945 and 9 February 1946 Dorothea L. Dix operated on transport duty from San Francisco and other west coast ports to the Philippines, carrying replacements to the Pacific and returning veterans. She sailed to New York on 29 March 1946, was decommissioned there on 24 April 1946, and returned to the Maritime Commission for disposal the same day. Awards Dorothea L. Dix received five battle stars for World War II service.
Jun 06, 2014 · posted to the photo Carl W. Sharp