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Kevin Barry

AncientFaces Member since May 27, 2015

Researching: Barry

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Arrived NYC 1910 Ellis Island
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NYPD 13th Pct.
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William Dubarry, Dubarry and Count de Roquelaure,later lord Rennery, born in 1732 in Lévignac and died 2 August 1811 in Toulouse , a gentleman is famous for his marriage with Jeanne Becu, better known under the name of Madame du Barry . The name is borne from Dubarry 1400 around Toulouse .The arms of this family state: Gules a third gold bar placed in a lion circumvented even stitching on the whole an ostrich and put money in sinister canton of the tip. The Dubarry nobly lived, that is to say, their own income, without attaching any condition, fortune or industry. The family settled in the SIXTEENTH century to Lévignac-sur-Save , where it will not move until the MID-EIGHTEENTH century.Several members receive consular charges and are qualified Lévignac governor. William was the son of Antoine Dubarry, captain of the regiment of the Isle-de-France, and Marguerite Catherine Thérèse Cécile de La Caze, married in 1722. It embraces a very early age military career. At the end of the year 1746, he became a lieutenant in the regiment of the Cantabrians. In 1750, he moved to Santo Domingo as a lieutenant and was promoted on 1 May 1758, captain of a company of troops detached from the navy. Returned to France the following year for health reasons, he moved to Lévignac and Toulouse . An unexpected stroke of fortune will then change his life. Marriage In a letter of June 1768, his brother Jean-Baptiste Dubarry - said Roué - the calls to Paris, where he promises him fortune. He plans to marry his own mistress, Jeanne Becu, in order to present it to Louis XV . The union was blessed on September 1, 1768 in the church of Saint-Laurent (Paris) . In exchange for this marriage of convenience, Guillaume can go home, with a pension of five thousand pounds. Retirement Back to Toulouse , Guillaume seeks to restore its image tarnished in polite society by marrying the first whore in France. In 1772, he acquired the King (but in reality was offered) the duchy of Roquelaure near Auch , the castle and the adjoining Rieutort. After the death of Louis XV in May 1774, its neighbors, including the first president of the parliament of ToulouseJean-Antoine Niquet, assign it to justice for many neighborhood problems. Back to Toulouse , Guillaume seeks to restore its image tarnished in polite society by marrying the first whore in France. In 1772, he acquired the King (but in reality was offered) the duchy of Roquelaure near Auch , the castle and the adjoining Rieutort. After the death of Louis XV in May 1774, its neighbors, including the first president of the parliament of ToulouseJean-Antoine Niquet, assign it to justice for many neighborhood problems. Tired of the hassles, hoping to get closer to Toulouse , he exchanged, by act of February 26, 1781 concluded with Pierre-Emmanuel Reversat Celes, Count de Marsac, advisor to the Parliament of Toulouse , the castle against the Rieutort Castle Reynerie consisting in a castle and other buildings, lawn, garden, fishpond, cropland, meadows, woods and vineyards. He rebuilt the house up to date, following the inspiration of theChâteau de Bagatelle near Paris. There is also undertaking important work of interior with lounge music rotunda, a marble hall, the top-of-door ... His life is divided between his mansion in the rue du Sénéchal in Toulouse, where he remains the winter, and his madness Reynerie , it occupies the season. This is where he ended his days at the age of 79 years, 2 August 1811
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'Guerilla Days in Ireland' is the extraordinary story of the Irish War of Independence and the fight between two unequal forces, which ended in the withdrawal of the British from twenty-six counties. Seven weeks before the Truce of July 1921, the British presence in County Cork consisted of 8,800 front line infantry troops, 1,150 Black & Tan soldiers, 540 Auxiliaries, 2,080 machine gun corps, artillery and other units - a total of over 12,500 men. Against these British forces stood the Irish Republican Army whose flying columns never exceeded 310 riflemen in the whole of the county. These flying columns were small groups of dedicated Volunteers, severely commanded and disciplined. Constantly on the move, their paramount objective was merely to exist, to strike when conditions were favourable and to avoid disaster at all costs. 'In Guerilla Days in Ireland' Tom Barry describes the setting up of the West Cork flying column, its training and its plan of campaign.
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Rick Barry: Hall of Fame forward Rick Barry is the only player ever to lead the NCAA, NBA, and ABA in scoring. His name appears near the top of every all-time offensive list. He scored more than 25,000 points in his professional career and in four different seasons averaged more than 30 points. He was named to 12 All-Star teams, four All-NBA First Teams, and five All-ABA First Teams. Barry was a nearly unstoppable offensive juggernaut, a passionate competitor with an untempered desire to win. Height: 6-7; Weight: 220 lbs. Honors: Elected to Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (1987); NBA champion (1975); NBA Finals MVP (1975); All-NBA First Team (1966, '67, '74, '75, '76); All-NBA Second Team (1973); Rookie of the Year (1966); Eight-time NBA All-Star; All-Star MVP (1967); One of 50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996). ABA Honors: ABA champion (1969); All-ABA First Team (1969, '70, '71, '72); Four-time ABA All-Star. Full Name: Richard Francis Dennis Barry III Born: 3/28/44 in Elizabeth, N.J. High School: Roselle Park (N.J.) College: Miami (Fla.) Drafted: San Francisco Warriors, 1965 (No. 2 overall) Transactions: Signed with Oakland Oaks of ABA, 1967; Oaks become Washington Capitols, 1969; Traded to New York Nets, 1970; Returned to NBA's Warriors, '72; Signed with Houston Rockets, 6/17/78
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Barry was born in Killorglin, County Kerry. He was the son of a Royal Irish Constabulary policeman. Four years later, Thomas Barry Senior resigned and opened a business in his hometown of Rosscarbery, County Cork.[1] Barry was educated for a period at Mungret College, County Limerick from 25 August 1911 to 12 September 1912. The reason for his short stay is indicated by a reference from the school register of the Apostolic School, Mungret College; 'Went - Home (ran away) without knowledge of superiors - no vocation'.[2] In 1915, during World War I, he enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery at Cork and became a soldier in the British Army. “ In June, in my seventeenth year, I had decided to see what this Great War was like. I cannot plead I went on the advice of John Redmond or any other politician, that if we fought for the British we would secure Home Rule for Ireland, nor can I say I understood what Home Rule meant. I was not influenced by the lurid appeal to fight to save Belgium or small nations. I knew nothing about nations, large or small. I went to the war for no other reason than that I wanted to see what war was like, to get a gun, to see new countries and to feel a grown man. Above all I went because I knew no Irish history and had no national consciousness.[3] ” He fought in Mesopotamia (then part of the Ottoman Empire, present day Iraq). He rose to the rank of sergeant.[4] Barry was offered a commission in the Royal Munster Fusiliers but refused it.[citation needed] While outside Kut-el-Amara Barry first heard of the Easter Rising. On his return to Cork he was involved with ex-servicemen's organisations. In 1920, Barry joined the 3rd (West) Cork Brigade of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) which was then engaged in the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921). He was involved in brigade council meetings, was brigade-training officer, flying column commander, was consulted by IRA General Headquarters Staff (GHQ), and also participated in the formation of the IRA First Southern Division. The West Cork Brigade became famous for its discipline, efficiency and bravery, and Barry garnered a reputation as the most brilliant field commander of the war. On 28 November 1920, Barry's unit ambushed and killed almost a whole platoon of British Auxiliaries at Kilmichael, County Cork. In March 1921 at Crossbarry in the same county, Barry and 104 men, divided into seven sections, broke out of an encirclement of 1,200 strong British force from the Essex Regiment. In total, the British Army stationed over 12,500 troops in County Cork during the conflict, while Barry's men numbered no more than 310. Eventually, Barry's tactics made West Cork ungovernable for the British authorities. "They said I was ruthless, daring, savage, blood thirsty, even heartless. The clergy called me and my comrades murderers; but the British were met with their own weapons. They had gone in the mire to destroy us and our nation and down after them we had to go."[5]
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Sir Charles Barry, (born May 23, 1795, London, Eng.—died May 12, 1860, London), one of the architects of the Gothic Revival in England and chief architect of the British Houses of Parliament. The son of a stationer, Barry was articled to a firm of surveyors and architects until 1817, when he set out on a three-year tour of France, Greece, Italy, Egypt, Turkey, and Palestine to study architecture. In 1820 he settled in London. One of his first works was the Church of Saint Peter at Brighton, which he began in the 1820s. In 1832 he completed the Travellers’ Club in Pall Mall, the first work in the style of an Italian Renaissance palace to be built in London. In the same style and on a grander scale he built (1837–41) the Reform Club. He was also engaged on numerous private mansions in London, the finest being Bridgewater House, which was completed in the 1850s. In Birmingham one of his best works, King Edward’s School, was built in the Perpendicular Gothic style between 1833 and 1837. For Manchester he designed the Royal Institution of Fine Arts (1824–35) and the Athenaeum (1836–39), and for Halifax the town hall (completed in the early 1860s). In 1835 a design competition was held for a new Houses of Parliament building, also called Westminster Palace, to replace the one destroyed by fire in 1834. Barry won the contest in 1836, and the project occupied him for the rest of his life. With the help of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, Barry designed a composition ornamented in the Gothic Revival style and featuring two asymmetrically placed towers. The complex of the Houses of Parliament (1837–60) is Barry’s masterpiece. Barry was elected an associate of the Royal Academy of Arts in 1840 and a royal academician in the following year and received many foreign honours. He was knighted in 1852 and, on his death, was buried in Westminster Abbey. His son, Edward Middleton Barry (1830–80), also a noted architect, completed the work on the Houses of Parliament. These are some of the architectual accomplishments of Charles Barry: The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament Clock Tower, Palace of Westminster also known as "Big Ben" 10 Kensington Palace Gardens Andaz Liverpool Street Hotel Bridgewater House, Westminster Church of All Saints Dunrobin Castle Halifax Town Hall Lancaster House Nelson's Column Pepper Pot, Brighton Reform Club Royal Manchester Institution St Andrew's Church, Waterloo Street, Hove St Saviour's Church, Ringley Travellers Club Upper Brook Street Chapel, Manchester Victoria Tower
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Robert Fitz-Stephen (c.1120–1183) [1] was a Cambro-Norman soldier, one of the leaders of the Norman invasion of Ireland, for which he was granted extensive lands in Ireland. He was a son of the famous Nest, daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, the last king of Deheubarth (South Wales). His father was Nest's second husband, Stephen, Constable of Cardigan (Welsh: Aberteifi). Following the death of her first husband, Gerald de Windsor, her sons had married her to Stephen, her husband's constable for Cardigan. By Stephen, she had another son, possibly two; the eldest was Robert, and the younger may have been Hywel. In Wales Robert succeeded his father in his office (Custos Campe Abertivi).[2] He first appears in history in 1157, when King Henry II of England invaded Gwynedd. While the main royal army faced the forces of Owain Gwynedd east of the River Conwy, a force including Robert and his half-brother Henry Fitzroy (the illegitimate son of Nest and King Henry I) attacked Anglesey by sea. However, this force was defeated in a battle in which Robert was seriously wounded and Henry killed. Robert was captured in November 1165 by Rhys ap Gruffydd (The Lord Rhys) who was the nephew of his mother Nest. The King of Leinster appealed to Rhys (in 1167) to release Robert for an expedition to Ireland. Rhys did not oblige at the time, but in response to a further appeal in 1168 released Robert from captivity IRELAND In 1167, the King of Leinster, Diarmait Mac Murchada, was deprived of his kingdom by the High King of Ireland. To recover his kingdom, the exiled king fled to Wales and from there to England and Aquitaine in France, in order to have the consent of King Henry II of England to recruit soldiers. On returning to Wales, Fitz-Stephen helped him to organise a mercenary army of Norman and Welsh soldiers, including Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, alias Strongbow. On 1 May 1169, Robert led the vanguard of Diarmait Mac Murchada's Cambro-Norman auxiliaries to Ireland, thereby precipitating the Norman invasion of Ireland. The main invasion party landed near Bannow strand, County Wexford with a force of 30 knights, 60 man-at-arms and 300 archers. The next day, Maurice de Prendergast landed at the same bay with ten knights and 60 archers. This force merged with about 500 soldiers commanded by Diarmait . In return for capturing Wexford, MacMurrough granted Fitz-Stephen a share in two cantreds, Bargy and Forth which comprised all the land between Bannow and the town of Wexford. The cantreds were to be held jointly with Maurice FitzGerald, Lord of Lanstephan, his half-brother. The Siege of Wexford lasted only two days. The first attack was repulsed at the loss of 18 Normans and 3 defenders. These are believed to have been the only deaths during the siege. Fitz-Stephen then ordered his men to burn all the ships in the town's harbour. The next morning, the attack on Wexford began again. Shortly after, the defenders sent envoys to Diarmait. The defenders agreed to surrender and renew their allegiance to Diarmait. It is claimed that they were persuaded to surrender by two bishops who were in the town at the time. He was accompanied at the siege by Robert de Barry, the eldest son of his half-sister Angharad de Windsor. Nest then, was the mother of Robert, Maurice and Angharad. Taken prisoner by the The MacCarthy Reagh in 1171, he was by them surrendered to Henry II of England, who appointed him lieutenant of the Justiciar of Ireland, Hugh de Lacy. Robert rendered good service in the troubles of 1173 and was rewarded in 1177 by receiving from the king of England, jointly with Miles de Cogan, a grant of the kingdom of Cork, "from Lismore to the sea".[3] with the exception of the city of Cork. Cogan was the son of his half-sister Gwladys. The native princes of that province disputed the king's right to dispose of the territory on the grounds that they had not resisted king Henry, or committed any act that would have justified the forfeiture of their lands. In consequence, Fitz-Stephen had difficulty in maintaining his position and was nearly overwhelmed by a rising in the Kingdom of Desmond in 1182. Having no living male heirs, Fitz-Stephen eventually ceded these territories to Philip de Barry, his half-nephew around 1180: "Robert FitzStephen to all his lords, friends, and dependents, French, English, Welsh, and Irish, greeting. Be it known to you that I have given and granted to my nephew, Philip de Barri, three cantreds in my land of Cork, namely, Olethan, with all its appurtenances, and two other cantreds in the kingdom of Cork, just as they shall come by lot to him, for ten knights' service, to himself and his heirs, to be held of me and my heirs, for the service aforesaid, in land, in sea, in waters, in ways, etc., to be held as freely of me as I hold of our lord the King, save to me the service of the aforesaid ten knights.[4] The second son of his half-sister Angharad de Windsor, Philip de Barry came to Ireland in 1183 or 1185 to assist his half-uncle. Together with another relative, Raymond FitzGerald (also known as Raymond Le Gros), they recovered their lands in the modern county of Cork, specifically the baronies of Killede, Olethan and Muscarydonegan. A compromise agreement was reached that allowed the barons to hold seven cantreds near Cork with the remaining twenty-four being retained by the native princes. The date of his death is uncertain.
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Robert de Barry (fl. 1175) was a Cambro-Norman warrior from Manorbier in Pembrokeshire who participated in the colonisation of the Kingdom of Desmond following the Norman invasion of Ireland. Ancestry Nesta Robert's role in the invasion and colonisation of Ireland, and his position in the medieval Welsh-Irish Norman society, was largely due to his membership of the extended family of descendants of Princess Nest ferch Rhys of Deheubarth.[1] Nest had three sons and a daughter with her husband Gerald de Windsor: the daughter, Angharad, married William de Barry. Nest also had a son - Robert Fitz-Stephen - by her second husband. William de Barry William Fitz Odo de Barry was the son of Odo or Otho, a Norman knight who assisted in the Norman Conquest of England and Wales during the 11th century. William rebuilt Manorbier Castle in stone and the family retained the lordship of Manorbier until the 15th century. Barry's brothers were Philip de Barry, Edmond de Barry and Gerald of Wales. He accompanied his half-uncle Robert to Ireland in 1169 and took part in the Siege of Wexford,[2] where he was wounded. He is mentioned as still engaged in warfare about 1175 by his brother Gerald, the historian, who highly extols his prowess. According to the "Archdall's Lodge" (1789) source, Robert, "after his services in Ireland is said to seat himself at Sevington, in Kent," and "about the year 1185 being killed at Lismore,". But as he was elder than his brother Gerald, who was born in 1146 or 1147, this Robert was about forty years old in 1185. The same source reports that the Robert who was slain near Lismore in that year was only an adolescens that is, between fifteen and twenty eight years of age. It is improbable therefore that Robert (aged 40) was slain at Lismore. That person is more likely to be his namesake, the son of his brother Philip
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The Norman invasion of Ireland was a two-stage process, which began on 1 May 1169 when a force of loosely associated Norman knights landed near Bannow, County Wexford at the request of Dermot MacMurrough (Diarmait Mac Murchada), the ousted King of Leinster, who sought their help in regaining his kingdom. On 18 October 1171, Henry II landed a much bigger army in Waterford to ensure his continuing control over the preceding Norman force. In the process he took Dublin and had accepted the fealty of the Irish kings and bishops by 1172, so creating the Lordship of Ireland, which formed part of his Angevin Empire. Treaty of Windsor Pope Adrian IV, the only English pope, in one of his earliest acts issued a papal bull in 1155, giving Henry authority to invade Ireland as a means of ensuring reform by bringing the Irish Church more directly under the control of the Holy See.[1] Little contemporary use, however, was made of the bull Laudabiliter since its text enforced papal suzerainty not only over the island of Ireland but of all islands off of the European coast, including England, in virtue of the Constantinian Donation. The relevant text reads: There is indeed no doubt, as thy Highness doth also acknowledge, that Ireland and all other islands which Christ the Son of Righteousness has illumined, and which have received the doctrines of the Christian faith, belong to the jurisdiction of St. Peter and of the holy Roman Church. References to Laudabiliter become more frequent in the later Tudor period when the researches of the Renaissance humanist scholars cast doubt on the historicity of the Donation. But even if the Donation was spurious, other documents such as Dictatus papae (1075–87) reveal that by the 12th century the Papacy felt it had political powers superior to all kings and local rulers. Pope Alexander III, who was Pope at the time of the invasion, mentioned and reconfirmed the effect of Laudabiliter in his "Privilege" of 1172. Invasion of 1169 Original landing site for the invasion – Bannow Bay After losing the protection of Tyrone Chief, Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland, who died in 1166, MacMorrough was forcibly exiled by a confederation of Irish forces under the new High King, Rory O'Connor. MacMurrough fled first to Bristol and then to Normandy. He sought and obtained permission from Henry II of England to use the latter's subjects to regain his kingdom. Having received an oath of fealty from Dermod, Henry gave him letters patent in the following words: Henry, King of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, to all his liegemen, English, Norman, Welsh and Scotch, and to all the nations under his dominion, greeting. When these letters shall come into your hands, know ye, that we have received Dermod, Prince of Leinster, into the bosom of our grace and benevolence. Wherefore, whosoever, in the ample extent of all our territories, shall be willing to assist in restoring that prince, as our vassal and liegeman, let such person know, that we do hereby grant to him our licence and favour for the said undertaking.[2] By 1167 MacMurrough had obtained the services of Maurice Fitz Gerald and later persuaded Rhys ap Gruffydd Prince of Deheubarth to release Fitz Gerald's half-brother Robert Fitz-Stephen from captivity to take part in the expedition. Most importantly he obtained the support of the Earl of Pembroke Richard de Clare, known as Strongbow. The first Norman knight to land in Ireland was Richard fitz Godbert de Roche in 1167, but it was not until 1169 that the main body of Norman, Welsh and Flemish forces landed in Wexford. Within a short time Leinster was conquered, Waterford and Dublin were under Diarmait's control. Strongbow married Diarmait's daughter, Aoife, and was named as heir to the Kingdom of Leinster. This latter development caused consternation to Henry II, who feared the establishment of a rival Norman state in Ireland. Accordingly, he resolved to visit Leinster to establish his authority. Arrival of Henry II in 1171 Henry landed with a large fleet at Waterford in 1171, becoming the first King of England to set foot on Irish soil. Both Waterford and Dublin were proclaimed Royal Cities. In November Henry accepted the submission of the Irish kings in Dublin. In 1172 Henry arranged for the Irish bishops to attend the Synod of Cashel and to run the Irish Church in the same manner as the Church in England. Adrian's successor, Pope Alexander III, then ratified the grant of Ireland to Henry, ".. following in the footsteps of the late venerable Pope Adrian, and in expectation also of seeing the fruits of our own earnest wishes on this head, ratify and confirm the permission of the said Pope granted you in reference to the dominion of the kingdom of Ireland." Henry was happily acknowledged by most of the Irish Kings, who saw in him a chance to curb the expansion of both Leinster and the Normans. He then had to leave for England to deal with papal legates investigating the death of Thomas Becket in 1170, and then for France to suppress the Revolt of 1173–1174. His next involvement with Ireland was the Treaty of Windsor in 1175 with Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair.[3] However, with both Diarmuid and Strongbow dead (in 1171 and 1176 respectively) and Henry back in England, within two years this treaty was not worth the vellum it was inscribed upon. John de Courcy invaded and gained much of east Ulster in 1177, Raymond FitzGerald (known as Raymond le Gros) had already captured Limerick and much of the Kingdom of Thomond (also known as North Munster), while the other Norman families such as Prendergast, fitz-Stephen, fitz-Gerald, fitz-Henry and le Poer were actively carving out petty kingdoms for themselves. In 1185 Henry awarded his Irish territories to his 18-year-old youngest son, John, with the title Dominus Hiberniae ("Lord of Ireland"), and planned to establish it as a kingdom for him. When John unexpectedly succeeded his brother Richard as king in 1199, the Lordship became a possession of the English Crown. Subsequent assaults While the main Norman invasion concentrated on Leinster, with submissions made to Henry by the other provincial kings, the situation on the ground outside Leinster remained unchanged. However, individual groups of knights invaded: Connacht in 1175 and 1200–03, led by William de Burgh Munster in 1177, led by Raymond le Gros East Ulster in 1177, led by John de Courcy These further conquests were not planned by or made with royal approval, but were then incorporated into the Lordship under Henry's control, as with Strongbow's initial invasion
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Kevin Barry Guillaume DuBarry lived at Castle Reynerie (Toulouse).
Jan 17, 2013 · posted to the photo Guillaume DuBarry (William)
Kevin Barry Nasta daughter Angharad, who married William Fitz Odo de Barry (William de Barry), by whom she was the mother of Philip de Barry, founder of Ballybeg Abbey at Buttevant in Ireland Robert de Barry Edmond de Barry Gerald of Wales Nest is the maternal progenitor of the Fitzgerald and Barry dynasty, two of the most celebrated families of Ireland and Great Britain.
Jan 13, 2013 · posted to the photo Nest ferch Rhys (Princess of Wales)