Kym Ney

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Kym Ney Grandma Leora also told me about one time when her Mother Julia Vilate Warner Carling got trapped in the outhouse by a bull. She was making a visit to it when a bull escaped from the field. The bull trapped her inside and was hitting it shaking it from side to side. She was inside screaming at the top of her lungs, and scared for her life as the house was tipping from one side to the other. The men heard the screams and came and rescued her. Grandma Leora said they were also the first ones in town to have electric lights. They just had a bulb hanging from the ceiling. Grandma Vilate would put her white oil cloth on the table under the light and stand back and admire how it pretty it looked all lit up. People would drive for miles around to look at their porch light. Grandma said that the electricity cost 90 cents a month and Grandpa Merrit was always complaining about how expensive it was and to not be so wasteful. After Grandma Leora had gotten married, she became interested in doing her family genealogy. It was at this time she found her parents Merrit and Vilate Carling's marriage license. She could see where her mother's birth year had been erased and 1886 had been hand written in. She asked her father and he told her that it was because her mother was extremely embarrassed about marrying a younger man and had tried to change all records of her birth. When Merrit and Vilate were married in 1910, Vilate was 26 and Merrit was 21. In those days, women did not marry younger men and Vilate was quite embarrassed over the fact. She was actually born in 1884. Grandma Leora had always known her mother was older but never understood the embarrassment. She had questioned her mother about why she married him then. She even came right out and asked her mother, " Did you have to get married or something?" Grandma Vilate was quite taken back and highly insulted as she answered, " Absolutely not!!" Grandma Vilate told Grandma Leora that she had first seen Merrit as a child while buying ice cream up to Harriet Mae Mcbride Carling's house. He was just a little boy then. Harriet later became her mother in law. Merrit and Vilate both sang in the Tom Beaston's choir. This is where the two really met and got involved together. Vilate told Leora that Merrit would not leave her alone and was always hanging around and pestering her. He was always over to her house and her parents were sick of him. Because he wouldn't leave her alone and was always bothering her, she decided to marry him to solve the problem. She knew that people knew she was older than him but changing the dates on records made her feel better about the difference in age. When Vilate was quite advanced in age, she really could not remember what her correct birth year was any longer or how old she really was. With the excitement and fears of the upcoming Y2K new millennium, I started wondering how people felt about the turn of the century in the year 1900. Were they scared or excited for the new century? I asked Grandma Leora if her mother ever talked about what it was like when the new year was welcomed in for 1900. Grandma Vilate would have been about 16 years old at the time. Grandma Leora said she only asked her mother about it one time. Vilate told her she could remember everyone being drunk in the streets of Fillmore, hollering and yelling. Several of the men had guns and they were shooting them off in the streets. Everyone was scared to let their kids out of the house because they were afraid they would get shot by the drunks. Grandma Vilate told her that, "When drunks shoot guns, someone always gets killed!" So Leora asked her if anyone got killed that night and she replied, "Not that I remember." She told her that there were a lot to tired people in Fillmore the next day.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Carling
Kym Ney When Grandma Leora was about 4 or 5 years old, it had been predicted that the world was going to come to an end on a certain day. She doesn't remember who made the prediction or why but most everyone in town believed that it was true. A good portion of the residents of Fillmore decided they wanted to go to the mountains to wait for the end of the world so they could be closer to the Lord. Grandma said she watched out the window while numerous horses and buggys went by heading for the mountains. Her Father Merrit Carling wasn't quite sure if he believed the prediction or not. But he was not going to leave his house and head to the mountains. He was going to stay in his own house and wasn't going anywhere. He said he would wait for the Lord in his own house. Grandma was terrified of what was going to happen, but they all went to bed. The next morning they woke up and were surprised to still be there. Grandma Vilate made the comment, " Well were all still here and we never got blown up!"
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Carling
Kym Ney EATING PEAS Grandma Leora told me that one of her favorite memories of her Grandpa Warner was the way he always ate his peas. The family had peas a lot for dinner. Grandpa Warner would always eat his peas with a knife instead of a fork or a spoon. He would line up about eight peas perfectly straight on his knife to eat them. His hands shook really bad but he would never lose a pea when getting them to his mouth. It fascinated the grand kids to watch him eat them. Grandma Warner would always say to him, "Now Jed, we have company, Please don't put your peas on your knife!" But he always did and the kids loved it and him.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Warner
Kym Ney Subject: [UTMILLAR] Allen Russell Posted on: Millard Co. Ut Biographies Reply by clicking on "homepage" Surname: Russell, Gardner ------------------------- Black, Susan W. E. Early LDS Membership Data (Infobases, 1995): Comments: In 1860, Allen had a household of 7, real wealth of $400 and personal wealth of $700. In 1870, Allen had a household of 5, real wealth of $800 and personal wealth of $450. Allen was a Patriarch in the South Sanpete Stake, Sanpete County, Utah. He came to Utah with his father in 1852. At Fillmore he acted as a member of the city council, acted as city marshal and road supervisor many years, and from 1869 to 1901 labored as a home missionary in the Millard Stake. In 1906 he moved from Fillmore to Manti, where he worked in the Temple for a number of years in the interest of his dead relatives and friends. Allen came to Utah on September 24, 1852 with the Benjamin Gardner Company. He was a city marshal, a member of the city council for two years, a road supervisor for 12 years. Allen also served as a member of the High Council of the Millard Stake from 1869 to 1901. Vocation: Farmer; 1860, 1870
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Russell
Kym Ney Grandma Leora told me this little story about her Grandpa Allen Russell when I was visiting her for her birthday in March 1998. She said that she was always together with her cousins, Edith, Maline, and Fawn. Whenever Grandpa would see them coming, he would always say, " Here comes my four little flowers. Grandma Leora said he would always prophesy of things in the future and start to cry. Grandpa always warned them and said, " Lookout for the seventies and then on. Because that is when all the terrible things would begin to happen in the world." There will be wars and many terrible things. He always said " terrible". He had them all so scared, they thought the world was coming to an end. Grandpa would have a lot of visions. He would sit to the table and start to shake when he was having one. Grandma would say, " Now Pa, Don't have one of your visions now. Wait until after we eat!" The kids would be scared have to death. Grandma would tell them not to pay any attention to him. I asked my Grandma Leora at age 85 to tell me her memories of her Great Grandfather Allen Russell. She said she did not have a lot of memories of him as she was only 6 years old when he died of old age. The one that stuck out the most to her besides his many visions, was of his special outhouse. Because of his advanced age and health it was very difficult for him to walk the distance from the house to the outhouse. So his family built him a boardwalk to walk out to it which fascinated Grandma. She said his outhouse was the nicest around. He had a nice handle on the door instead of the regular strap most people had. He had it all decorated nice inside with pictures. He also had a toilet lid which no one else did along with real toilet paper. Everyone else had to use catalogs. Grandma said that toilet paper was two rolls for a nickel. They were always told to use the catalogs instead of the expensive toilet paper. Grandma told me she has many good memories of the hours she sat in the two seatter outhouses with her best friend and first cousin Edith Warner. They would spend hours sitting together talking, looking thru the catalogs and dreaming of what they would buy. They regularly cleaned and scoured the outhouses and kept ashes by the holes to cover the smells.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Russell
Kym Ney EXCERPT FROM ALLEN RUSSELL JOURNAL Dated Thursday, June 13, 1901 Pages 219 - 220 In the morning about 4 o'clock, the Lord opened my eyes of my understanding and saw plainly my sins and iniquities, and I did seek him from the bottom of my heart for forgiveness of my sins in prayer and supplication before him. And then I realized the importance of the saying in the Book of Mormon, " The Lord gives unto men weakness, that they may be humble," and the Lord did except my humble acknowledgment and did forgive me of all my sins, according to his promise, and the spirit of the Lord did rest upon me in great abundance, so much that I did thank and praise his Holy name for his loving kindness and his tender mercies towards me, a time that I never shall forget and the Lord has said how great is his joy in the soul that repenth; Doctrine & Covenants; Sec 18 verse 13.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Russell
Kym Ney Subject: [UTMILLAR] Orange Warner Posted on: Millard Co. Ut Biographies Reply by clicking on "homepage" above. Surname: Warner, Esshom, Shurtliff, Black, Kelsey, Burzee, Robison, Tyler ------------------------- Esshom, Frank. Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p. 1230: Came to Utah in October of 1851, with the Luman Shurtliff company. He was an Indian War veteran; helped to build the first wall around Fillmore to protect the settlers against Indians. Black, Susan W. E. Early LDS Membership Data (Infobases, 1995): Comments: In 1860 Orange had a household of 10, real wealth of $500, and personal wealth of $1200. Vocation: Farmer, 1860 Property: Nauvoo Visitor's Center, Land Records Office: He owned Block 43 in Nauvoo, which is bordered by Hyrum St. on the north; Joseph St. on the south; Wells St. on the east; and Durphy St. on the west. Endowment: Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, p. 327. Utah Arrival: LDS Film #298442, Utah Immigration Card Index, 1847-1868: Warner, Orange 1851, Crossed plains in 3rd company, or Capt. Easton Kelsey's Company. Journal History, Dec. 31, 1851. Supplement, p. 4. History of Orange Warner and wives taken from family group sheets: Arrived in Salt Lake Valley with Shirtliff Company in Oct. 1851., went down to Fillmore, Millard, Utah arriving on 28 Oct 1851. Orange Warner was born 23 June 1805 in Charlotteville, Schoharie, New York, son of Horatio Warner and Mary or Polly Burzee (of Massachusetts). Orange Warner married 1st Lovina Robison; 2nd Delilah Robison; 3rd Mary Elvira Tyler between 1847 and 1849. His portrait hangs in the Utah State Capital Building in Fillmore, Utah.
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Warner
Kym Ney One time Merrit Carling was out in the back field cutting hay with power machinery. He was wearing an old pair of overalls that were frayed all along the bottom. His wife, Vilate had warned him not to wear them, but he had not listened. Somehow the frayed part of his overalls got caught in the power machinery while it was running. Merrit was quickly being sucked into the machinery and knew he was going to die. He kept pulling back as the machine ate his clothes one piece at a time and all he could do was let it. Eventually it had stripped him down to nothing and had shredded all of his clothes to pieces. When all his clothes were gone he was freed and he was feeling lucky to be alive with just cuts and scrapes. All he could find to cover him was a little piece of burlap sack to walk back to the house to. When his wife Vilate saw him coming, wearing nothing but a burlap sack and a dirty face, she threw up her arms as she always did and exclaimed, " Oh Lord, He has finally flipped his lid! "
Dec 01, 2002 · posted to the surname Carling