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Larry Cornwell

AncientFaces Member since May 27, 2015

About: Have prepared biographies of over 350 of my ancestors, will send to cousins.

Researching: Ross, Lambert, Jenkins, Chambers, Kerr, Bush, Cunningham, Hubbard, Cornwell, Boon, Barger, Beatty, Ewing, Elder, Lockhart, Houtz, Stryker, Vennink, Brokaw, Mckimmey, Calahan, Van Fossen, Prall, Langhiet

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A photo of Madelyn Frances (Kerr) Cornwell
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John F. Thompson was born Jun 4, 1829 in Kendel, Westmoreland County, England and died Feb 29, 1908 in Blair, Washington County, Nebraska at the age of 78. He married Susan Elizabeth Sanders on Feb 16, 1857 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. She was born Dec 30, 1838 in England and died Mar 24, 1926 in Blair, Washington County, Nebraska at the age of 87. She was the daughter of Edward Saunders and Elizabeth Coombe. According to Grace Thompson, their granddaughter, both were Episcopalians, and were buried from that church. John Thompson immigrated to America in 1851, according to the 1900 census. In the 1870 census for Nebraska, Douglas County, Omaha Fifth Ward, page 44, lines 14-19, the John Thompson family consisted of the following: Thompson, John, 32 [actually 41], laborer, born in Ireland [actually England], both parents foreign born Thompson, Susan, 27 [actually 31], keeping house, born in Illinois [actually England], both parents foreign born Thompson, Jennie, 7, born in Illinois, both parents foreign born Thompson, Lizzie, 5, born in Illinois, both parents foreign born Thompson, John, 9, born in Illinois, both parents foreign born Thompson, Isabella, 10, born in Ireland [actually Illinois], both parents foreign born In the 1880 census for Nebraska, Washington County, Blair Precinct (Roll 756, page 39), the John Thompson family consisted of the following: NAME AGE PROFESSION BIRTHPLACE Thompson John 52 Farmer England " Susan 49 Keeps house England " Isabella 19 Works on farm Illinois " Jennie 17 At home Illinois " Elizabeth 15 At home Illinois " David 10 At school Nebraska " Susan 7 At school Nebraska " William 4 Nebraska " Frank 6/12 (Dec) Nebraska Both John's and Susan's parents' birthplaces were shown as England. His age should have been shown as 50 and hers as 41. The Abram Leach family, including Henry 21, was listed just below the John Thompson family. Henry married Jane Thompson. In the 1885 Nebraska state census, Blair Township, Washington County, the John Thompson family is listed as John, 55 and Susan, 47, both born in England; and children Daniel, 15; Susan, 12; William, 9; Frank, 6; and James, 2; all born in Nebraska. In the 1900 census for Nebraska, Washington County, Blair (Roll 941, page 230), the John Thompson family consisted of the following: NAME BIRTH AGE OCCUPATION Thompson, John June 1829 70 Retired Blacksmith ---- , Susan Dec. 1839 60 John Thompson was listed as immigrating to the United States in 1851, and Susan in 1854. They had been married for 43 years. They were shown as residing on Lincoln Street and owning their home. Susan was shown as being one year younger than her actual age, the mother of ten children, nine still living. According to their granddaughter Grace Thompson, he sent money home to his parents, and made five trips back to England in his lifetime. The Blair (Nebraska) Courier published the following article on Feb 20, 1907: "The Thompson Golden Wedding. "Mr. and Mrs. John Thompson on last Saturday, February 16th, celebrated their golden wedding. It was celebrated at the old homestead two miles south of Blair. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson came from the East to Nebraska along in the fifties and have lived in this county a greater part of the time. About four years ago they moved from the farm to Blair, where they now reside. "Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have nine children, all of whom were present. Mrs. Rose of Lyons, Neb., Mrs. Henry Leach, Mrs. Frank Brooks, Mrs. U. S. Cornwall, Messrs. John, Daniel, William, Frank and James of Blair. The children presented their parents with a gold chain and a pair of spectacles; Mr. and Mrs. John McDonald, gold brooch and cuff buttons; Mrs. Schmidt, ferns and cut flowers, Rose Dowden, flowers. "The following friends and relatives were present: Mr. Henry Leach and family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. U. S. Cornwall, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thompson, Mr. Daniel Thompson and family, Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt, Mr. and Mrs. Hindley, Mr. and Mrs. Barry, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, Mr. Pat. Murray, Misses Rose Dowden, Lizzie Beals, Mayme Barry and Mr. Carl Schmidt. "At 12:30 dinner was served and a more sumptuous repast could not be served. The table was loaded down with good things and every one did ample justice to them. "Too much credit could not be given to the ladies who served and waited on the table and catered to the wants of every one present. One of the platters used on this occassion was used fifty years ago on their wedding day. Mr. Thompson also wore the same gloves which he wore on their wedding day fifty years ago. "Mr. Thompson has just passed his 78th year and Mrs. Thompson her 68th. In the afternoon music, singing and dancing were indulged in and every one present enjoyed themselves immensely. It was a day long to be remembered by all. "At five o'clock Mr. Mangold, Blair's favorite photographer, was on deck and took the family group. When departing for their homes every one said they had an enjoyable time, and wished Mr. and Mrs. Thompson many years added to their life." John Thompson's will was written as follows: "In the name of God Amen. "I, John Thompson, of the County of Washington and State of Nebraska, considering the uncertainty of this mortal life, and being of sound mind and memory, do make and publis this my last will and testament, in manner and form following, that is to Say: "First -- I direct that my funeral charges, the expenses of administering my estate, and all my just debts be paid out of my personal property, if that be insufficient I authorise my executors hereafter named, to sell so much of my real estate as may be necessary for that purpose, "Second -- I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Susan Thompson all of my real and personal property of which I may die seized, to have and to hold for her use and benefit during her natural life. "Third -- I hereby give and bequeath all of my real and personal property which may be left after the death of Said Susan Thompson, to my children or their decendants, to share and share alike. "Fourth -- I hereby appoint my beloved wife Susan Thompson Executor of this my Last Will and Testament. "In witness whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this 23d day of February 1891. John Thompson "We whose names are hereto subscribed, do hereby certify that John Thompson the Testator, subscribed his name to this instrument in our presence and in the presence of each of us, and declared at the same time in our presence and hearing that this instrument was his last will and testament. And we at his request Sign our names hereto in his presence as attesting witnesses. "Stacey? O. Perkins of Blair Neb. Clark O Hanlon of Blair Nebr." His death certificate showed his place of death as Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, on Feb 29, 1908. His birth was shown as Jun 4, 1829, birthplace England, father's name Daniel Thompson, mother's name Isabella Mawson, both parents born in England. His occupation was listed as blacksmith. He died at 7 a.m. at the age of 78 years, 8 months, and 25 days of nephritis prostatitis, of some months duration, contributing was eremia and heart failure for about 10 days. His daughter Susan Cornwell of Herman, Nebraska provided the data on his parents and birth. He was buried in Blair on Mar 2, 1908. His obituary appeared in the Blair Democrat on that day: "OBITUARY "John F. Thompson was born at Kendal, Westmoreland county, England, June 4, 1829, and died February 29th, 1908, at Blair, aged 78 years, eight months and twenty-five days. "Mr. Thompson came to America in 1851, stopping first at Cleveland [Cuhohoga County] Ohio, and going to Chicago a few years later, where he lived during the civil war. He was married to Susan Elizabeth Saunders on February 16, 1857, and in 1866 moved to Omaha with his family. He was one of the pioneer blacksmiths in the U. P. shops and remained in Omaha for a number of years. "About thirty-five years ago Mr. Thompson moved on a 160-acre farm two mIles south of Blair, which time has been spent on the farm and in this city. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were the parents of ten children, one, a girl, having died in infancy, the balance living in this state. J. F. lives in Blair, Dan E., Wm. E., Frank C. and Jas. S. live on farms near Blair, Mrs. A. W. Rose living at Rosalie, Mrs. H. S. Leach living west of Blair, Mrs. W. F. Brooks living in Blair and Mrs. U. S. Cornwall, living on a farm near Herman. These, with two brothers, one in Omaha and the other in England, besides his bereaved wife are all of the deceased's near kin. "On the 16th of February, 1907, Mr. Thompson and his wife celebrated their golden wedding, and all the children and their families were present. His life was an eventful one. Robust in health, never knowing what sickness was, he had traveled a great deal in the early days, twice going back to England. He worked in Idaho and Texas; was a good provIder for his family and never neglected his duties as a husband and father. "The immediate cause of Mr. Thompson's death was bladder trouble and Saturday morning with no one present except the family physician and his devoted wife his spirit returned to the one who gave it. "Funeral services were held from the Episcopal church Monday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. A. E. March officiating. The funeral was largely attended by neighbors, friends and grief-stricken relatives to pay their last sad respects to a good neighbor, good father and a devoted husband. "The entire community sympathizes with the heartbroken wife who for over fifty years was the help mate of the deceased." John Thompson was buried in the Blair cemetery in Block 7, Lot 3, Graves 1 and 2. His cemetery records shows accurate birth and death dates, age 78. Place of death and parentage were not shown. The children of John F. Thompson and Susan Elizabeth Sanders were: i Isabella, b. Aug 13, 1858, m. A. W. Rose ii John F., b. Aug 20, 1860 iii Jane, b. Sep 20, 1862, m. after 1880 to Henry S. Leach iv Elizabeth, b. Jan 8, 1865, m. W. Frank Brooks v Esther, b. Oct 2, ca. 1867, d. Aug 20, ca. 1870 vi Daniel Edward, b. Jan 15, 1870, m. Mollie Victoria Blankenbeckler on Nov 1, 1899, d. Jun 29, 1961 *vii Susan, b. Mar 7, 1873, m. Ulysses Simpson Cornwell on Dec 31, 1890, d. Jan 15, 1937 viii William E., b. Dec 25, 1875 ix Frank C., b. Dec 6, 1879 x James S., b. May 31, 1883
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Jan Strycker was born between Oct 10 and Dec 31, 1614 in Ruinen, Province of Drenthe, the Netherlands, and died Mar 3, 1697 in Midwout, Long Island, New York, at 82. His first wife was Lambertje Roelofse Seubering. She was born in 1616 in the Netherlands, the daughter of Roelof Lukassen Seubering. She died in Jun 1675. His second wife was Swantje Jans, the widow of Cornelis de Potter, whom he married Apr 30, 1679. She died in 1686. His third wife was Teuntje Teunis, whom he married on Mar 31, 1687 in New York. She was the widow of Jacob Hellakers, alias Swart or Swartout. In Jan 1643, the States General of the Netherlands offered a grant of land in New Amsterdam (New York) to Jan and Jacobus Strycker, provided they took twelve families from the Netherlands with them to America. They accepted the grant eight years later when Jacobus, in 1651, came to America, followed by Jan in 1652. On Dec 11, 1653, Jan Strycker was one of 19 men who signed a petition against the conduct of Director Peter Stuyvesant of the Council in New York, to the States General in the Netherlands. They signed on behalf of the colonies and villages of the province of New Netherland. In 1654, Jan Strycker took the lead in forming a Dutch colony on Long Island, or Middlewoods (now Flatbush, a section of Brooklyn), and was selected as the chief magistrate of Midwout that year. He held this office for most of the next twenty years. On Dec 17, l654, he was appointed one of two commissioners to build the Dutch Church there, the first erected on Long Island. The church was designed to be 60 feet by 20 feet and 12 feet high. In 1655, Jan's brother Jacobus painted a picture of him. A photo of this picture is in the New York Historical Society Quarterly Bulletin Index, volume X, Apr, 1926- Jan, 1927, page 85. As of 1945, the original hung in the National Art Gallery in Washington, D.C. On Apr 10, 1664, he represented Midwout in the Landtdag, a general assembly called by the burgomasters, which was held at the city hall in New Amsterdam, to consider the precarious condition of the country. On Aug 28, l664, Director Peter Stuyvesant addressed a letter to the Dutch towns on Long Island, calling upon them "to send every third man to defend the Capital from the English now arriving at the Narrows." Jan Strycker answered for Midwout that it was impossible to comply with his demands as "we must leave wives and children seated here in fear and trembling, which our hearts fail to do -- as the English are themselves hourly expected there." In 1665, he was one of the representatives in the Hempstead Convention. On Aug 18, 1673, he attended the Council of War in Fort William Hendrick and was elected "schepen." On Oct 25, 1673, Captain Jan Strycker was appointed in charge of the militia for the town of Midwout (Flatbush), Long Island. (New York Colonial Muster Rolls 1664-1775, Vol 1, page 188, Annual Report of the State Historian, page 384)His brother Jacobus administered the oath and installed him into office. On Mar 26, 1674, he and 12 others were named to representMidwout in a conference to be held in New Orange (now Albany) to confer with Governor Colve on the state of the Country. (Caspar Steynmets was also one of the thirteen.) In 1675, he was taxed for 3 persons, 4 horses, 22 cows, 2 hogs, and 30 morgen of land and valley. On Oct 10, 1677, Jan Strycker certified that he was 64 years old and had the occupation of armoror (gunsmith). In Sep, 1687, he took the oath of allegiance in Kings County, declaring that he had been in this country 35 years. He was buried in the rear churchyard at the corner of Flatbush Avenue and Church Lane (now Church Avenue), presently a ghetto area. Members of the National Society, Daughters of the American Colonists, who claimed Jan Strycker as their ancestor for membership, include Miss Katharine Naomi Stryker, membership number 911, Mrs. Sarah Wilson Allen, 1087, Miss Loretta Schenck, 2437, Mrs. Helen Stryker Pursel, 8510, and Miss Mildred Tulley, 10364. The children of Jan Strycker and Lambertje Roelofse Seubering were: i Altje, b. ca. 1632, m. Abraham Jorise Brinckerhoff on May 20, 1660 ii Jannetje, m. 1st, Cornelius Jansen Berrien in1652; 2nd, Samuel Edsall in 1689 iii Garrit Janse, b. 1652, m. Styntie Gerritse Dorland on Dec 25 or 28, 1683, d. 1695. 4 children iv Angenietje, b. ca. 1650, m. 1st, Jan Cornelise Boomgaert (Bougaert) in 1674; 2nd, Claes Tysen v Hendrick, m. Catherine Kip on Feb 11, 1687, d. Jan 23, 1687/8 vi Eytje (Ida), m. Stoffel Probasco, d. Sep 29, 1687 *vii Pieter, b. Nov 1, 1653, m. 1st, Annetje Barends on May 29, 1681; 2nd, Aertje Bogart, d. Jun 11, 1741. 11 children viii Sarah, b. 1655, m. Joris Hansen Bergen, Sr. on Aug 11, 1678
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Francis Lambert Kerr graduated from the first high school class of Manilla, Crawford Co, Iowa in 1904, and Iowa State College in 1909. When the U. S. needed men who had experience with horses, motors, and mathematics, he entered the U.S. Army on Oct 29, 1918 and was assigned to the 9th Observation Battery, preliminary to entering the field artillery officers training school at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, KY. The armistice was signed 13 days later, and he was discharged on Dec 5, 1918.
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On the right, Lt. William Glen Cornwell, United States Army Air Corps, Postal Officer, Amarillo Army Air Field, Texas, 1945
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Cadet William Glen Cornwell, Reserve Officer Training Corps, Iowa State College, 1937
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Captain William Glen Cornwell, Postal Officer, United States Army Air Corps, Amarillo Army Air Field, Amarillo, Texas, 1945
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Six daughters of Albert Miner Chambers and Mary Grier. Alberta Mary, m. Christopher Wilson; Mabel Leora, m. Harry Wilkins; Alta Emily, m. William Ulysses Cornwell; Myrtle Marie, m. Hans Marius Nelsen; Nellie Elizabeth, m. Herman Dais; Ruby Estelle, m. Ted Maslonka.
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These four were the children of James Grier and Emily Jane Jenkins. James Arthur (Art) married Adale J. Donovan, and died Jun 10, 1964. Emma married --Street. Mary married Albert Miner Chambers on Mar 11, 1890 and died Apr 7, 1954. Albert (Bert) married Clara Belle Donovan on Dec 18, 1894 and died Dec 31, 1937.
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Albert Grier was the son of James Grier and Emily Jane Jenkins. He married Clara Belle Donovan on Dec 18, 1894, and died Dec 31, 1937.
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Larry Cornwell Man on the left in picture is unknown. Man on the right is William Glen Cornwell
Jul 28, 2013 · posted to the person William Glen Cornwell