August Geissel

(1827 - 1901)

A photo of August Geissel
August Geissel
1827 - 1901
Born
c. 1827
Death
January 12, 1901
Richmond County, New York United States
Summary
August Geissel was born c. 1827. He died on January 12, 1901 in New York at 74 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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August Geissel
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August Geissel
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August Geissel died on in Richmond County, New York United States
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August Geissel was born
August Geissel died on in Richmond County, New York United States
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August Geissel passed away on January 12, 1901 in New York at 74 years of age. He was born c. 1827. We have no information about August's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during August's lifetime.

In 1827, in the year that August Geissel was born, Englishman John Walker invented the first friction match, which he named Lucifer. The match consisted of a wooden stick coated with sulphur and tipped with a mixture of sulphide of antimony, chlorate of potash, and gum. A box of 50 matches was one shilling and came with folded sandpaper to use to strike a match.

In 1856, at the age of 29 years old, August was alive when on January 26th the Battle of Seattle occurred. Marines from the ship the USS Decatur, stationed in Elliott Bay, along with about 50 Seattle settlers, fought Native Americans in the area. Territorial Governor Isaac Stevens had declared a "war of extermination" on Native communities 5 days before.

In 1878, by the time he was 51 years old, on June 15th, photographer Eadweard Muybridge - at the request of Leland Stanford - produced the first sequence of stop-motion still photographs. Stanford contended that a galloping horse had all four feet off the ground. Only photos of a horse at a gallop would settle the question and, using 12 cameras and a series of photos, Muybridge settled the question: Stanford was right. Muybridge's use of several cameras and stills led to motion pictures.

In 1896, by the time he was 69 years old, on May 18th, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson. By a vote of 7 to 1, the Court upheld state racial segregation laws, introducing the idea of "separate but equal" facilities for races.

In 1901, in the year of August Geissel's passing, John Pierpont "J. P." Morgan created U.S. Steel. J.P. Morgan was an American banker and financier who dominated U.S. business at this time. He had previously overseen the creation of General Electric, as well as International Harvester and AT&T. He has been referred to as America's greatest banker. U.S. Steel was the first billion dollar company in the world, worth $1.4 billion in 1901.

Other August Geissels

Bio
c. 1857 - Nov 21, 1928 1857 - 1928

Other Geissels

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c. 1857 - Nov 21, 1928 1857 - 1928
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c. 1860 - May 29, 1906 1860 - 1906
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c. 1858 - Nov 17, 1926 1858 - 1926
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c. 1838 - Nov 28, 1911 1838 - 1911
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c. 1851 - Apr 7, 1934 1851 - 1934
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Other Bios

Bio
c. 1857 - Nov 21, 1928 1857 - 1928
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c. 1863 - Aug 19, 1918 1863 - 1918
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c. 1837 - Nov 1, 1901 1837 - 1901
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c. 1860 - May 29, 1906 1860 - 1906
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c. 1858 - Nov 17, 1926 1858 - 1926
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c. 1838 - Nov 28, 1911 1838 - 1911
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c. 1851 - Apr 7, 1934 1851 - 1934
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c. 1897 - Jul 16, 1898 1897 - 1898
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c. 1873 - Dec 27, 1931 1873 - 1931
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c. 1873 - Jan 8, 1947 1873 - 1947
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c. 1847 - Dec 15, 1925 1847 - 1925
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c. 1849 - May 3, 1927 1849 - 1927
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c. 1893 - Nov 15, 1948 1893 - 1948
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c. 1864 - Sep 4, 1929 1864 - 1929
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c. 1874 - Jun 15, 1912 1874 - 1912
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c. 1923 - Jan 8, 1929 1923 - 1929
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c. 1923 - Jan 8, 1929 1923 - 1929
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c. 1866 - Aug 9, 1916 1866 - 1916
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c. 1870 - Jul 2, 1929 1870 - 1929
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