Avery Greenside

(1906 - 1968)

A photo of Avery Greenside
Avery Greenside
1906 - 1968
Born
February 7, 1906
Death
March 1968
Summary
Avery Greenside was born on February 7, 1906. He died in March 1968 at 62 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Avery Greenside
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Avery Greenside died in March 1968 at 62 years of age. He was born on February 7, 1906. We are unaware of information about Avery's family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Avery's lifetime.

In 1906, in the year that Avery Greenside was born, author Upton Sinclair exposed the public-health threat of the meat-packing industry in his book The Jungle. While his intent was to show the lives of exploited lives of immigrants in Chicago and other industrialized cities, most people were horrified by how the meat that ended up on their tables was handled. There was such an outcry that legislation was passed to regulate meat packing. Sinclair said " "I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach."

In 1919, he was merely 13 years old when on January 6th, President Theodore Roosevelt died. Having gone to bed the previous night after being treated for breathing problems, the ex-President died in his sleep from a clot that had traveled to his lungs. He was 60. After a simple service, Roosevelt was buried on a hillside overlooking Oyster Bay.

In 1930, when he was 24 years old, as head of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, William Hays established a code of decency that outlined what was acceptable in films. The public - and government - had felt that films in the '20's had become increasingly risque and that the behavior of its stars was becoming scandalous. Laws were being passed. In response, the heads of the movie studios adopted a voluntary "code", hoping to head off legislation. The first part of the code prohibited "lowering the moral standards of those who see it", called for depictions of the "correct standards of life", and forbade a picture from showing any sort of ridicule towards a law or "creating sympathy for its violation". The second part dealt with particular behavior in film such as homosexuality, the use of specific curse words, and miscegenation.

In 1941, when he was 35 years old, on June 25th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802, prohibiting racial discrimination in the defense industry. EO 8802 was the first federal action to prohibit employment discrimination - without prejudice as to "race, creed, color, or national origin" - in the U.S. Civil Rights groups had planned a march on Washington D.C. to protest for equal rights but with the signing of the Order, they canceled the March.

In 1968, in the year of Avery Greenside's passing, on January 31st, the North Vietnamese launched the Tet Offensive, a turning point in the Vietnam War. 70,000 North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces swarmed into South Vietnam. The South Vietnamese and US troops held off the offensive but it was such fierce fighting that the U.S. public began to turn against the war.

Other Avery Greensides

Bio
c. 1906 - Unknown 1906 - ?

Other Greensides

Bio
Apr 24, 1904 - January 1984 1904 - 1984
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Dec 20, 1917 - Nov 27, 2004 1917 - 2004
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Sep 11, 1895 - January 1980 1895 - 1980
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Jan 3, 1905 - Dec 12, 1996 1905 - 1996
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Sep 23, 1927 - Jun 11, 2009 1927 - 2009
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May 8, 1921 - February 1992 1921 - 1992
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Oct 29, 1913 - Sep 18, 2007 1913 - 2007
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Aug 5, 1947 - August 1981 1947 - 1981
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Jun 13, 1882 - December 1968 1882 - 1968
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Sep 14, 1884 - December 1969 1884 - 1969
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c. 1949 - Unknown 1949 - ?
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c. 1950 - Unknown 1950 - ?
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c. 1922 - Unknown 1922 - ?
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c. 1938 - Unknown 1938 - ?
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c. 1868 - Sep 23, 1923 1868 - 1923
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c. 1888 - May 16, 1948 1888 - 1948
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c. 1869 - Apr 30, 1941 1869 - 1941
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c. 1847 - Apr 6, 1914 1847 - 1914
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c. 1894 - Aug 18, 1904 1894 - 1904
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c. 1857 - Oct 21, 1922 1857 - 1922

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