Charles G Drew (1858 - 1899)

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Charles G Drew
1858 - 1899
Born
c. 1858
Death
August 17, 1899
Queens County, New York United States
Summary
Charles G Drew was born c. 1858. He died on August 17, 1899 in New York at age 41.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Charles G Drew
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Charles Drew died on in Queens County, New York United States
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Charles Drew was born
Charles Drew died on in Queens County, New York United States
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Charles G Drew died on August 17, 1899 in New York at age 41. He was born c. 1858. We have no information about Charles's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Charles' lifetime.

In 1858, in the year that Charles G Drew was born, in July, the "Fifty-Niners" began the Pike's Peak Gold Rush. Lasting until about 1861, gold fever hit western Kansas Territory and southwestern Nebraska Territory.

In 1860, at the age of just 2 years old, Charles was alive when on February 26th, near Eureka California, white settlers attacked a tribe of Wiyot Indians on Indian Island. Over 60 women, children and older people died. Bret Harte - a writer and friend of Mark Twain - reported the news about the massacre to the papers in San Francisco.

In 1877, by the time he was 19 years old, on July 14th, strikes and resulting riots began at the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad. A sympathy strike and rioting began in Pittsburgh and a worker's rebellion began in St. Louis, then spread to other cities. 100 people were killed before the strikes ended when President Rutherford B. Hayes sent federal troops to each of the cities involved.

In 1884, at the age of 26 years old, Charles was alive when on August 5th, the cornerstone for the base of the Statue of Liberty - a gift from the people of France - was laid. 120,000 people - most donations were $1 - donated to the completion of the base. An 1883 poem by Emma Lazarus was also written to raise funds. That poem was included in the base of the statue and is well known today. The most famous phrase: "Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

In 1899, in the year of Charles G Drew's passing, the meaning of Chinese "oracle bones" was rediscovered. Farmers in China had been turning up the bones in their fields for generations but most often they were ground up and sold as medicine. The chancellor of the Imperial Academy and a friend noticed, before they ground the bones, that they had writing. The bones had been used around the second millennium BC for divination.

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