Donald Miller (1900 - 1966)

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Donald Miller
1900 - 1966
Born
December 12, 1900
Death
September 1966
Last Known Residence
zip code 92667
Summary
Donald Miller was born on December 12, 1900. He died in September 1966 at 65 years old. We know that Donald Miller had been residing in zip code 92667.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Donald Miller
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zip code 92667
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Donald Miller died in September 1966 at age 65. He was born on December 12, 1900. We are unaware of information about Donald's family. We know that Donald Miller had been residing in zip code 92667.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Donald's lifetime.

In 1900, in the year that Donald Miller was born, the unemployment rate in the U.S. was 5.0% and the cost of a first-class stamp was $0.02. 31% of all workers were employed in the public service sector, 19% of women were employed (1 percent of all lawyers and 6 percent of physicians were women), 6% of the workforce were children, and 14% of the workforce was "non-white."

In 1927, when he was 27 years old, the first "talkie" (a movie with music, songs, and talking), The Jazz Singer, was released. Al Jolson starred as a cantor's son who instead of following in his father's footsteps as expected, becomes a singer of popular songs. Banished by his father, they reconcile on his father's deathbed. It was a tear-jerker and audiences went wild - especially when they heard the songs. Thus begun the demise of silent films and the rise of "talkies".

In 1931, Donald was 31 years old when in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1951, he was 51 years old when on June 25th, CBS began broadcasting in color. There were well over 10 million televisions by that time. The first show in color was a musical variety special titled "Premiere". Hardly anyone had a color TV that could see the show.

In 1966, in the year of Donald Miller's passing, on July 1st, Medicare became available after President Johnson signed into law the Medicare Act in 1965. President Truman had received the first Medicare card since he had been the first to propose national healthcare law. insurance.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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