Edwin Binstab Wood (1834 - 1890)

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Edwin Binstab Wood
1834 - 1890
Born
1834
Death
1890
Wms Town, Australia
Last Known Residence
Wms Town, Australia
Summary
Edwin Binstab Wood was born in 1834. He was born to John Wood and Ann Mary Wood. He died in 1890 in Wms Town, Australia at 56 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Edwin Binstab Wood
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Edwin Binstab Wood
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Wms Town, Australia
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Edwin Wood died in in Wms Town, Australia
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Edwin Binstab Wood passed away in 1890 in Wms Town, Australia at 56 years old. He was born in 1834. He was born to John Wood and Ann Mary Wood.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Edwin's lifetime.

In 1834, in the year that Edwin Binstab Wood was born, on July 15th, the Spanish Inquisition - which began in the 15th century - was abolished by the royal decree of Isabella II. The last known person to be hung by the Inquisition was Cayetano Ripoll - in 1826 - who was a school teacher. He was accused of teaching "deist principles" - which posits that God does not interfere directly with the world.

In 1841, at the age of just 7 years old, Edwin was alive when on February 4th, James Morris wrote about Groundhog Day in his diary - the first known reference to the day in North America. He wrote: "Last Tuesday, the 2nd, was Candlemas day, the day on which, according to the Germans, the Groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and if he sees his shadow he pops back for another six weeks nap, but if the day be cloudy he remains out, as the weather is to be moderate."

In 1868, at the age of 34 years old, Edwin was alive when on July 9th, The Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution was ratified. The Fourteenth Amendment guaranteed African Americans full citizenship and equal protection under the law. It also gave all persons in the United States due process of law. The former Confederate states hotly contested the amendment but were forced to go along so that they could regain representation in Congress

In 1889, when he was 55 years old, on May 31st, the South Fork Dam collapsed. Located in western Pennsylvania, the dam failed - sending more than 20 million tons of water into the towns below it. The flood killed more than 2,200 people in and around Johnstown. The newly formed Red Cross responded to the disaster.

In 1890, in the year of Edwin Binstab Wood's passing, on January 2nd, Alice Sanger became the first female staffer to work in the White House. She was hired as a stenographer and, as such, took dictation.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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