Elsie Ruff (1890 - 1967)

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Elsie Ruff
1890 - 1967
Born
January 4, 1890
Death
July 1967
Last Known Residence
Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin 53404
Summary
Elsie Ruff was born on January 4, 1890. She died in July 1967 at 77 years old. We know that Elsie Ruff had been residing in Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin 53404.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Elsie Ruff
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Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin 53404
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Elsie Ruff died in July 1967 at age 77. She was born on January 4, 1890. There is no information about Elsie's surviving family. We know that Elsie Ruff had been residing in Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin 53404.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Elsie's lifetime.

In 1890, in the year that Elsie Ruff was born, on January 2nd, Alice Sanger became the first female staffer to work in the White House. She was hired as a stenographer and, as such, took dictation.

In 1907, Elsie was 17 years old when the showman Florenz Ziegfeld introduced his Ziegfeld Follies. Ziegfeld was inspired by the Folies Bergère of Paris and the show was a step up from the then current vaudeville shows. The top entertainers of the time played in the Follies but the stars were the Ziegfeld girls - beautiful chorus girls in elaborate costumes. For almost a quarter of a century, the Ziegfeld follies were the toast of Broadway.

In 1928, at the age of 38 years old, Elsie was alive when Mickie Mouse was born! He first appeared in Disney's Steamboat Willie, along with Minnie. Although they were in two previous shorts, this was the first to be distributed. Steamboat Willie took advantage of the new technology and was a "talkie" - music was coordinated with the animation. It became the most popular cartoon of its day.

In 1941, when she was 51 years old, on June 25th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802, prohibiting racial discrimination in the defense industry. EO 8802 was the first federal action to prohibit employment discrimination - without prejudice as to "race, creed, color, or national origin" - in the U.S. Civil Rights groups had planned a march on Washington D.C. to protest for equal rights but with the signing of the Order, they canceled the March.

In 1967, in the year of Elsie Ruff's passing, on November 7th, President Johnson signed legislation passed by Congress that created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), which would later become PBS and NPR. The legislation required CPB to operate with a "strict adherence to objectivity and balance in all programs or series of programs of a controversial nature".

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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