Ethel French (1902 - 1966)

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Ethel French
1902 - 1966
Born
May 30, 1902
Death
October 1966
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16505
Summary
Ethel French was born on May 30, 1902. She died in October 1966 at 64 years of age. We know that Ethel French had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16505.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Ethel French
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16505
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Ethel French passed away in October 1966 at 64 years of age. She was born on May 30, 1902. There is no information about Ethel's family. We know that Ethel French had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16505.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ethel's lifetime.

In 1902, in the year that Ethel French was born, the first Rose Bowl game was played in Pasadena, California. Called the "Tournament East–West football game" at the time, the Michigan Wolverines (East) played the Stanford Indians (West) - the Wolverines won 49 - 0. (The Stanford captain requested an end to the game with 8 minutes remaining.) The Tournament of Roses Parade began in 1890 and the football game began as a way to boost tourism in the area.

In 1919, at the age of 17 years old, Ethel was alive when on January 6th, President Theodore Roosevelt died. Having gone to bed the previous night after being treated for breathing problems, the ex-President died in his sleep from a clot that had traveled to his lungs. He was 60. After a simple service, Roosevelt was buried on a hillside overlooking Oyster Bay.

In 1941, when she was 39 years old, on June 25th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802, prohibiting racial discrimination in the defense industry. EO 8802 was the first federal action to prohibit employment discrimination - without prejudice as to "race, creed, color, or national origin" - in the U.S. Civil Rights groups had planned a march on Washington D.C. to protest for equal rights but with the signing of the Order, they canceled the March.

In 1952, when she was 50 years old, on July 2, Dr. Jonas E. Salk tested the first dead-virus polio vaccine on 43 children. The worst epidemic of polio had broken out that year - in the U.S. there were 58,000 cases reported. Of these, 3,145 people had died and 21,269 were left with mild to disabling paralysis.

In 1966, in the year of Ethel French's passing, on September 8th, the first Star Trek episode, "The Man Trap," was broadcast on NBC. The plot concerned a creature that sucked salt from human bodies. The original series only aired for 3 seasons due to low ratings.

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