Ethel Mary Eva (1896 - 1960)

A photo of Ethel Mary Eva
Add photo
Ethel Mary Eva
1896 - 1960
Born
1896
Death
1960
Ballarat, Australia
Last Known Residence
Ballarat, Australia
Summary
Ethel Mary Eva was born in 1896. She was born to Scarff James Eva and Emily Mary Brown Eva. She died in 1960 in Ballarat, Australia at age 64.
Updated: February 6, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Show & Tell Her Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that Ethel is always remembered.
Update biobiography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell Ethel's life so that she is always remembered.

Biography
Ethel Mary Eva
Most commonly known as
Ethel Mary Eva
Full name
Other names or aliases
Ballarat, Australia
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Ethel Eva was born in
Birth
Ethel Eva died in in Ballarat, Australia
Death
Ethel Eva was born in
Ethel Eva died in in Ballarat, Australia
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Looking for a different Ethel Eva?
View other bios of people named Ethel Eva

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add Ethel's family friends, and her friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

There are no photos of Ethel Mary Eva! Please share photos of Ethel and the Eva family.
Photo

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about Ethel.

Cancel

Share Ethel's obituary or write your own to preserve her legacy.

Ethel Mary Eva passed away in 1960 in Ballarat, Australia at age 64. She was born in 1896. She was born to Scarff James Eva and Emily Mary Brown Eva.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ethel's lifetime.

In 1896, in the year that Ethel Mary Eva was born, on January 4th, Utah became the 45th state in the United States. After the LDS Church banned polygamy in 1890, Utah's application for statehood became acceptable to Congress and the Utah Territory became Utah..

In 1901, when she was merely 5 years old, Edward VII succeeded Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria of England had become Queen in 1837 and reigned until her death in 1901. Her 63 year reign was the longest in history prior to Elizabeth II who recently broke her record. The time during which she led the country was known as the Victorian era and she presided over great changes in the United Kingdom, including the expansion of the British Empire and the Industrial Revolution.

In 1933, at the age of 37 years old, Ethel was alive when on December 5th, the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified. The 21st Amendment said "The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed." Alcohol was legal again! It was the only amendment to the Constitution approved for the explicit purpose of repealing a previously existing amendment. South Carolina was the only state to reject the Amendment.

In 1951, she was 55 years old when on February 27th, the 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution (which limited the number of terms a president may serve to two) was ratified by 36 states, making it a part of the U.S. Constitution. The Amendment was both a reaction to the 4 term Roosevelt presidency and also the recognition of a long-standing tradition in American politics.

In 1960, in the year of Ethel Mary Eva's passing, on May 1st, an American CIA U-2 spy plane, piloted by Francis Gary Powers, was shot down by a surface-to-air missile over the Soviet Union. Powers ejected and survived but was captured. The U.S. claimed that the U-2 was a "weather plane" but Powers was convicted in the Soviet Union of espionage. He was released in 1962 after 1 year, 9 months and 10 days in prison.

Other Ethel Evas

Other Evas

Other Bios

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top