Flora Hamill (1889 - 1960)

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Flora Hamill
1889 - 1960
Born
1889
Death
1960
Heidelberg, Australia
Last Known Residence
Heidelberg, Australia
Summary
Flora Hamill was born in 1889. She was born to Sparks Hamill and Sarah York Hamill. She died in 1960 in Heidelberg, Australia at age 71.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Flora Hamill
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Flora Hamill
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Heidelberg, Australia
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Female
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Flora Hamill died in in Heidelberg, Australia
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Flora Hamill was born in
Flora Hamill died in in Heidelberg, Australia
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Flora Hamill died in 1960 in Heidelberg, Australia at 71 years of age. She was born in 1889. She was born to Sparks Hamill and Sarah York Hamill.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Flora's lifetime.

In 1889, in the year that Flora Hamill was born, on May 31st, the South Fork Dam collapsed. Located in western Pennsylvania, the dam failed - sending more than 20 million tons of water into the towns below it. The flood killed more than 2,200 people in and around Johnstown. The newly formed Red Cross responded to the disaster.

In 1932, Flora was 43 years old when five years to the day after Lindbergh crossed the Atlantic, Amelia Earhart flew solo from Newfoundland to Ireland, the first woman to cross the Atlantic solo and the first to replicate Lindbergh's feat. She flew over 2,000 miles in just under 15 hours.

In 1945, at the age of 56 years old, Flora was alive when on June 22nd, the Battle of Okinawa ended. A joint Army and Marine campaign, supported by the Navy, the Battle of Okinawa went on for 82 days. The last Japanese resistance on Okinawa was defeated. 4,907 Navy, 4,675 Army, and 2,938 Marine Corps personnel were killed in the battle on the US side. It is estimated that 110,071 on the Japanese side were killed - the estimate includes Okinawan citizens who were pressed into service and includes children. With the win of Okinawa, the United States gained an important base of operations in the Pacific.

In 1957, when she was 68 years old, on September 24th, the "Little Rock Nine" (nine African-American students) entered Little Rock High School. Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus had previously prevented the students from entering the school at the beginning of the term with the Arkansas National Guard - they blocked the door. President Eisenhower ordered federal troops - the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army - to guard the students and allow them entry.

In 1960, in the year of Flora Hamill's passing, on September 26th, the first televised debate for a Presidential campaign in the United States - Kennedy vs Nixon - was held. Seventy million people watched the debate on TV. The debate pre-empted the very popular Andy Griffith Show.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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