Francesco Giandinoto (1913 - 1975)

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Francesco Giandinoto
1913 - 1975
Born
1913
Death
1975
Fitzroy, Australia
Last Known Residence
Fitzroy, Australia
Summary
Francesco Giandinoto was born in 1913. He was born to Greg Giandinoto and Angela Morando Giandinoto. He died in 1975 in Fitzroy, Australia at age 62.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Francesco Giandinoto
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Francesco Giandinoto
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Fitzroy, Australia
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Francesco Giandinoto died in in Fitzroy, Australia
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Francesco Giandinoto was born in
Francesco Giandinoto died in in Fitzroy, Australia
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Francesco Giandinoto died in 1975 in Fitzroy, Australia at 62 years of age. He was born in 1913. He was born to Greg Giandinoto and Angela Morando Giandinoto.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Francesco's lifetime.

In 1913, in the year that Francesco Giandinoto was born, Henry Ford installed the first moving assembly line for the mass production of an entire automobile. It had previously taken 12 hours to assemble a whole vehicle - now it took only two hours and 30 minutes! Inspired by the production lines at flour mills, breweries, canneries and industrial bakeries, along with the disassembly of animal carcasses in Chicago’s meat-packing plants, Ford created moving belts for parts and the assembly line was born.

In 1926, he was just 13 years old when on November 15th, NBC was founded. It was the U.S.'s first major broadcast network. Ownership of the network was split between RCA (a majority partner at 50%), its founding corporate parent General Electric (which owned 30%), and Westinghouse (which owned the remaining 20%).

In 1952, when he was 39 years old, on July 2, Dr. Jonas E. Salk tested the first dead-virus polio vaccine on 43 children. The worst epidemic of polio had broken out that year - in the U.S. there were 58,000 cases reported. Of these, 3,145 people had died and 21,269 were left with mild to disabling paralysis.

In 1961, he was 48 years old when on August 13th, East Germany began erection of what would become the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin. In one day, they installed barbed wire entanglements and fences (called Barbed Wire Sunday in Germany). On August 17th, the first concrete elements and large blocks were put in place.

In 1975, in the year of Francesco Giandinoto's passing, on September 5th, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme tried to assassinate President Ford in Sacramento, California. She failed when her gun wouldn't fire. President Ford escaped a second assassination attempt 17 days later on September 22 when Sarah Jane Moore tried to shoot him in San Francisco. A bystander saw her raise her arm, grabbed it, and the shot went wild.

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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