Frederick Philli Doig (1904 - 1961)

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Frederick Philli Doig
1904 - 1961
Born
1904
Death
1961
Yall, Australia
Last Known Residence
Yall, Australia
Summary
Frederick Philli Doig was born in 1904. He was born to James Smith Doig and Anne Phillip Phillip Doig. He died in 1961 in Yall, Australia at age 57.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Frederick Philli Doig
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Frederick Philli Doig
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Yall, Australia
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Frederick Doig died in in Yall, Australia
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Frederick Doig was born in
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Frederick Philli Doig died in 1961 in Yall, Australia at age 57. He was born in 1904. He was born to James Smith Doig and Anne Phillip Phillip Doig.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Frederick's lifetime.

In 1904, in the year that Frederick Philli Doig was born, the United States acquired the Panama Canal Zone. Now an unincorporated territory of the U.S., the Canal Zone had been previously held by the French, who were constructing a canal. The U.S. took over the construction of the Panama Canal and it was finally finished in 1914, when it was opened to commercial shipping. The United States held the Canal Zone until 1979.

In 1911, he was only 7 years old when Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole, along with four fellow Norwegian explorers. After hearing that Peary had beaten him to the North Pole, Amundsen decided to tackle the South Pole. On December 14th, he succeeded.

In 1934, at the age of 30 years old, Frederick was alive when on July 22nd, gangster John Dillinger was killed in Chicago. His gang had robbed banks and police stations, among other charges, and he was being hunted by J. Edgar Hoover, head of the FBI - although many in the public saw him as a "Robin Hood". A madam from a brothel in which he was hiding became an informer for the FBI and, after a shootout with FBI agents, Dillinger was shot and died.

In 1946, he was 42 years old when pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock's book "The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care" was published. It sold half a million copies in the first six months. Aside from the Bible, it became the best selling book of the 20th century. A generation of Baby Boomers were raised by the advice of Dr. Spock.

In 1961, in the year of Frederick Philli Doig's passing, on April 17th, about 1,000 CIA trained Cuban exiles invaded Cuba with the intention of igniting a rebellion and overthrowing Castro. They were defeated within three days. Although the operation began under Eisenhower, Kennedy approved it and the operation, named the Bay of Pigs for the beach where they landed, was a humiliation for the United States.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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