George Robert Collett (1900 - 1976)

A photo of George Robert Collett
Add photo
George Robert Collett
1900 - 1976
Born
1900
Marysborough, Australia
Death
1976
Geelong, Australia
Last Known Residence
Marysborough, Australia
Summary
George Robert Collett was born in 1900 in Marysborough, Australia. He was born to William Henry Collett and Emily Corey Collett. He died in 1976 in Geelong, Australia at 76 years old.
Updated: August 1, 2019
ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
Show & Tell His Story
Share your memories, stories, and photos so that George is always remembered.
Update biobiography
What's this?

This collaborative biography is for you to show & tell George's life so that he is always remembered.

Biography
George Robert Collett
Most commonly known as
George Robert Collett
Full name
Other names or aliases
Marysborough, Australia
Last known residence
Male
Gender
George Collett was born in in Marysborough, Australia
Birth
George Collett died in in Geelong, Australia
Death
George Collett was born in in Marysborough, Australia
George Collett died in in Geelong, Australia
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Looking for a different George Collett?
View other bios of people named George Collett

Friends

Friends can be as close as family. Add George's family friends, and his friends from childhood through adulthood.

Add bio

Leave a comment to ask questions, share information, or simply to show that you care about George.

Cancel

Share George's obituary or write your own to preserve his legacy.

George Robert Collett died in 1976 in Geelong, Australia at 76 years of age. He was born in 1900 in Marysborough, Australia. He was born to William Henry Collett and Emily Corey Collett.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during George's lifetime.

In 1900, in the year that George Robert Collett was born, the Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud published his book (written in 1899) "The Interpretation of Dreams". Sigmund Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud in May of 1856, is the "father of psychoanalysis". Although he was a medical doctor, he was fascinated with the psyche and hypothesized the existence of the id, the ego, the superego, the libido, the unconscious, the Oedipus complex, and more. These are concepts that are still used by modern psychology.

In 1929, George was 29 years old when on March 4th, Herbert Hoover became the 31st President of the United States. Early in his presidency, the October stock market crash - "Black Tuesday" - occurred, which lead to the Great Depression. None of his economic policies were able to make a dent in the Depression. This lead to one term and the election of Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt winning the 1933 election in a landslide.

In 1959, by the time he was 59 years old, on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

In 1969, George was 69 years old when one hundred countries, along with the United States and the Soviet Union signed the nuclear nonproliferation treaty (NPT). It called for stopping the spread of nuclear weapons, the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and the goal of nuclear disarmament.

In 1976, in the year of George Robert Collett's passing, on August 4th, a mysterious illness struck an American Legion convention in Philadelphia. Within a week, 25 people had died and 130 people had been hospitalized. It was the first known instance of what came to be called "Legionnaires Disease."

Other George Colletts

Other Colletts

Other Bios

Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
See Success Stories
"Thank you for helping me find my family & friends again so many years after I lost them. I get the chance to remember them all this time later."

Highlights of just a few of the many successes of sharing memories on AncientFaces. From reuniting lost or 'orphan' photos with their families, seeing faces of relatives for the first time, to the many connections made with family & friends.

These special moments are why it's important we share.
Back to Top