Harriet Montague (1837 - 1920)

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Harriet Montague
1837 - 1920
Born
1837
Death
1920
Geelong, Australia
Last Known Residence
Geelong, Australia
Summary
Harriet Montague was born in 1837. She died in 1920 in Geelong, Australia at 83 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Harriet Montague
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Harriet Montague
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Geelong, Australia
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Harriet Montague died in in Geelong, Australia
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Harriet Montague was born in
Harriet Montague died in in Geelong, Australia
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Harriet Montague passed away in 1920 in Geelong, Australia at age 83. She was born in 1837. We are unaware of information about Harriet's family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Harriet's lifetime.

In 1837, in the year that Harriet Montague was born, on February 25th, in Philadelphia, the Institute for Colored Youth (ICY) - the oldest African-American university in the United States - was founded. It was the first institution for the higher education of black people in the United States. Founded by Quaker Richard Humphreys who gave $10,000 to establish the school, it still exists today - although the location has moved and it has been renamed Cheyney University. Humphreys was concerned about the struggles of free African Americans to make a living.

In 1878, when she was 41 years old, on June 15th, photographer Eadweard Muybridge - at the request of Leland Stanford - produced the first sequence of stop-motion still photographs. Stanford contended that a galloping horse had all four feet off the ground. Only photos of a horse at a gallop would settle the question and, using 12 cameras and a series of photos, Muybridge settled the question: Stanford was right. Muybridge's use of several cameras and stills led to motion pictures.

In 1885, by the time she was 48 years old, Germany's Karl Benz built the Benz Patent-Motorwagen, which had an internal combustion engine. It is considered to be the world's first automobile. The Benz cost $150 - just under $4,000 in today's money.

In 1903, when she was 66 years old, the United States Department of Commerce and Labor was created by President Theodore Roosevelt to control the excesses of big business. Renamed the Department of Commerce 10 years later, many departments concerned with workers were transferred to the Department of Labor at that time. Another spin-off, the Bureau of Corporations, became the Federal Trade Commission.

In 1920, in the year of Harriet Montague's passing, on November 2, radio station KDKA began broadcasting in Pittsburgh, PA. This was the first commercial radio broadcast in the United States. Westinghouse, a leading manufacturer of radios and the backer of the station, chose the date because of the Presidential election. People liked it because they could hear about the results of the election between Harding and Cox before the morning papers arrived. Four years later, there were 600 commercial stations broadcasting in the U.S.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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