Helen O'Brien (1918 - 1919)

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Helen O'Brien
1918 - 1919
Born
March 11, 1918
Death
January 22, 1919
Summary
Helen O'Brien was born on March 11, 1918. She died on January 22, 1919 before her first birthday.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Biography
Helen O'Brien
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Helen O'Brien
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Helen O'Brien died on
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Helen O'Brien was born on
Helen O'Brien died on
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Long Island National Cemetery Section Y Site 3645 2040 Wellwood Avenue, in Farmingdale, New York 11735
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Branch of service: Us Army
Rank attained: CPL
Wars/Conflicts: World War I

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Helen O'Brien died on January 22, 1919 before her first birthday. She was buried in Long Island National Cemetery Section Y Site 3645, Farmingdale, New York. She was born on March 11, 1918. We have no information about Helen's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Helen's lifetime.

In 1918, in the year that Helen O'Brien was born, in January, President Wilson presented his Fourteen Points, which assured citizens that World War I was being fought for a moral cause and outlined a plan for postwar peace in Europe. The only leader of the Allies to present such a plan, the Europeans thought Wilson was being too idealistic. The points included free trade, open agreements, democracy and self-determination. They were based on the research and suggestions of 150 advisors.

In 1919, in the year of Helen O'Brien's passing, in January, Nebraska was the 36th state to ratify the 18th Amendment, making it the law of the land. The 18th Amendment established Prohibition - a law against the production, transport, and sale of alcohol. Private consumption and possession were not prohibited. Several months later, the Volstead Act was passed, creating laws to enforce the Amendment. Bootlegging and bathtub gin followed.

In 1920, by the time she was just 2 years old, in September, a bomb exploded in the J.P. Morgan bank building in New York City, killing 30 people immediately - 8 later died due to their injuries - and injuring another 200. Killing more people than the 1910 bombing of the LA Times (the deadliest terrorist act up until then), no one took responsibility and the perpetrators were never found. Italian anarchists were suspected of the bombing.

In 1926, when she was merely 8 years old, on November 15th, NBC was founded. It was the U.S.'s first major broadcast network. Ownership of the network was split between RCA (a majority partner at 50%), its founding corporate parent General Electric (which owned 30%), and Westinghouse (which owned the remaining 20%).

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