Jack Rotar

(1884 - 1977)

A photo of Jack Rotar
Jack Rotar
1884 - 1977
Born
July 13, 1884
Death
April 1977
Last Known Residence
Enumclaw, King County, Washington 98022
Summary
Jack Rotar was born on July 13, 1884. He died in April 1977 at age 92. We know that Jack Rotar had been residing in Enumclaw, King County, Washington 98022.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Biography
Jack Rotar
Most commonly known name
Jack Rotar
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Enumclaw, King County, Washington 98022
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Jack Rotar was born on
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Jack Rotar passed away in April 1977 at 92 years of age. He was born on July 13, 1884. We are unaware of information about Jack's immediate family. We know that Jack Rotar had been residing in Enumclaw, King County, Washington 98022.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Jack's lifetime.

In 1884, in the year that Jack Rotar was born, on May 1st, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions - a US association - first resolved that "eight hours shall constitute a legal day's labour from and after May 1, 1886, and that we recommend to labour organisations throughout this jurisdiction that they so direct their laws as to conform to this resolution by the time named." Previously, workdays would consist of 10 to 16 hours a day - 6 days a week. It would take years before the 8 hour workday became common practice - and longer before it became a law.

In 1919, at the age of 35 years old, Jack was alive when in the summer and early autumn, race riots erupted in 26 U.S. cities, resulting in hundreds of deaths and even more people being badly hurt. In most cases, African-Americans were the victims. It was called the "Red Summer". Men who were returning from World War I needed jobs and there was competition for those jobs among the races. Tension was heightened by the use by many companies of blacks as strikebreakers.

In 1954, by the time he was 70 years old, on May 17th, the Supreme Court released a decision on Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. The ruling stated that state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students was unconstitutional thus paving the way for integration in schools.

In 1966, by the time he was 82 years old, on September 8th, the first Star Trek episode, "The Man Trap," was broadcast on NBC. The plot concerned a creature that sucked salt from human bodies. The original series only aired for 3 seasons due to low ratings.

In 1977, in the year of Jack Rotar's passing, on January 21st, President Carter pardoned "draft dodgers" - men who avoided the draft during the Vietnam War. He fulfilled a campaign promise with the pardon. But it only applied to civilian evaders - the estimated 500,000 to 1 million active-duty personnel who went AWOL were not included.

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c. 1937 - Unknown 1937 - ?
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c. 1969 - Unknown 1969 - ?
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c. 1979 - Unknown 1979 - ?
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Nov 8, 1916 - Jun 22, 2012 1916 - 2012

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