Jennie Lada (1900 - 1981)

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Jennie Lada
1900 - 1981
Born
October 5, 1900
Death
December 1981
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16503
Summary
Jennie Lada was born on October 5, 1900. She died in December 1981 at 81 years old. We know that Jennie Lada had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16503.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Jennie Lada
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16503
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Jennie Lada died in December 1981 at age 81. She was born on October 5, 1900. We are unaware of information about Jennie's family or relationships. We know that Jennie Lada had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16503.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Jennie's lifetime.

In 1900, in the year that Jennie Lada was born, the U.S. helped put down Boxer Rebellion. The Boxer Rebellion took place in China, where the presence of "outsiders" (foreigners) was resented. The United States, along with Austria-Hungary, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, and Russia, had business interests in China and these countries all sent troops to put down the Rebellion and keep China open to their presence and to Christian missionaries.

In 1916, at the age of 16 years old, Jennie was alive when the Battle of Verdun was fought from February through December. It was the largest and longest battle of World War I, lasting 303 days. The original estimates were 714,231 casualties - 377,231 French and 337,000 German, an average of 70,000 casualties a month. Current estimates are even larger. The Battle of the Somme was also fought from July through September of the same year. Original estimates were 485,000 British and French casualties and 630,000 German casualties.

In 1946, when she was 46 years old, pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock's book "The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care" was published. It sold half a million copies in the first six months. Aside from the Bible, it became the best selling book of the 20th century. A generation of Baby Boomers were raised by the advice of Dr. Spock.

In 1978, by the time she was 78 years old, on July 25th, Louise Brown, the first "test-tube baby", was born at Oldham Hospital in London. Louise was conceived through IVF (in vitro fertilization), a controversial and experimental procedure at the time.

In 1981, in the year of Jennie Lada's passing, on January 20th, Ronald Reagan became the 40th President of the United States. He ran against the incumbent, Jimmy Carter, and won 50.7% of the popular vote to Carter's 41.0%.

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