John Alfred Arnett (1927 - 1970)

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John Alfred Arnett
1927 - 1970
Born
1927
Death
1970
Cheltenham, Australia
Last Known Residence
Cheltenham, Australia
Summary
John Alfred Arnett was born in 1927. He was born to Alfred Thoma Arnett and Ethel Beatrice Luton Arnett. He died in 1970 in Cheltenham, Australia at 43 years of age.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Alfred Arnett
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John Alfred Arnett
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Cheltenham, Australia
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John Arnett died in in Cheltenham, Australia
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John Arnett was born in
John Arnett died in in Cheltenham, Australia
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John Alfred Arnett died in 1970 in Cheltenham, Australia at 43 years old. He was born in 1927. He was born to Alfred Thoma Arnett and Ethel Beatrice Luton Arnett.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1927, in the year that John Alfred Arnett was born, aviator and media darling Charles Lindbergh, age 25, made the first successful solo TransAtlantic flight. "Lucky Lindy" took off from Long Island in New York and flew to Paris, covering  3,600 statute miles and flying for 33 1⁄2-hours. His plane "The Spirit of St. Louis" was a fabric-covered, single-seat, single-engine "Ryan NYP" high-wing monoplane designed by both Lindbergh and the manufacturer's chief engineer.

In 1935, he was only 8 years old when on September 8th, Louisiana Senator Huey Long was shot by Dr. Carl Weiss. Weiss was shot and killed immediately by Long's bodyguards - Long died two days later from his injuries. Long had received many death threats previously, as well as threats against his family. He was a powerful and controversial figure in Louisiana politics (and probably gained power through multiple criminal acts). His opponents became frustrated with their attempts to oust him and Dr. Weiss was the son-in-law of one of those opponents. His funeral was attended by 200,000 mourners.

In 1941, John was just 14 years old when on June 25th, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802, prohibiting racial discrimination in the defense industry. EO 8802 was the first federal action to prohibit employment discrimination - without prejudice as to "race, creed, color, or national origin" - in the U.S. Civil Rights groups had planned a march on Washington D.C. to protest for equal rights but with the signing of the Order, they canceled the March.

In 1950, at the age of 23 years old, John was alive when on October 2, Charlie Brown appeared in the first Peanuts comic strip - created by Charles Schultz - and he was the only character in that strip. That year, Schultz said that Charlie was 4 years old, but Charlie aged a bit through the years.

In 1970, in the year of John Alfred Arnett's passing, on April 10th, Paul McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles. (John Lennon had previously told the band that he was leaving but hadn't publicly announced it.) By the end of the year, each Beatle had his own album.

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