John Grace (1861 - 1933)

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John Grace
1861 - 1933
Born
1861
Death
1933
Fitzroy, Australia
Last Known Residence
Fitzroy, Australia
Summary
John Grace was born in 1861. He was born to Grace Martin Grace and Margaret Dalton Grace. He died in 1933 in Fitzroy, Australia at age 72.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Grace
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John Grace
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Fitzroy, Australia
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John Grace died in in Fitzroy, Australia
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John Grace was born in
John Grace died in in Fitzroy, Australia
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John Grace passed away in 1933 in Fitzroy, Australia at 72 years of age. He was born in 1861. He was born to Grace Martin Grace and Margaret Dalton Grace.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1861, in the year that John Grace was born, on January 9th, Mississippi became the second state to secede from the Union. Within the same month, 5 more states seceded - Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Texas, and Louisiana - and Jefferson Davis, age 52, resigned as a U.S. Senator.

In 1884, at the age of 23 years old, John was alive when on May 1st, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions - a US association - first resolved that "eight hours shall constitute a legal day's labour from and after May 1, 1886, and that we recommend to labour organisations throughout this jurisdiction that they so direct their laws as to conform to this resolution by the time named." Previously, workdays would consist of 10 to 16 hours a day - 6 days a week. It would take years before the 8 hour workday became common practice - and longer before it became a law.

In 1902, by the time he was 41 years old, about 150 thousand United Mine Workers went on strike in eastern Pennsylvania for a wage increase and more suitable hours. They eventually got a 10% raise and their workday was reduced from 10 hours to 9. Because winter was coming and most people at the time heated their homes with coal, President Teddy Roosevelt arbitrated between the owners and the workers - the first time that the Federal government arbitrated in a strike.

In 1922, by the time he was 61 years old, the Reparations Commission assessed German liability for World War 1 at 132 billion gold marks (over $32 billion U.S. dollars at the time). This led to hyperinflation in Germany and created the political and social atmosphere in which Hitler was able to rise to power.

In 1933, in the year of John Grace's passing, Frances Perkins became the first woman to hold a cabinet-level position, appointed by President Roosevelt to serve as Secretary of Labor. She told him that her priorities would be a 40-hour work week, a minimum wage, unemployment compensation, worker’s compensation, abolition of child labor, direct federal aid to the states for unemployment relief, Social Security, a revitalized federal employment service, and universal health insurance. President Roosevelt approved of all of them and most them were implemented during his terms as President. She served until his death in 1945.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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