John Henry Thoma Topp (1890 - 1962)

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John Henry Thoma Topp
1890 - 1962
Born
1890
Death
1962
Toni, Australia
Last Known Residence
Toni, Australia
Summary
John Henry Thoma Topp was born in 1890. He was born to John Henry Topp. He died in 1962 in Toni, Australia at 72 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Henry Thoma Topp
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John Henry Thoma Topp
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Toni, Australia
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John Topp died in in Toni, Australia
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John Topp died in in Toni, Australia
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John Henry Thoma Topp died in 1962 in Toni, Australia at 72 years of age. He was born in 1890. He was born to John Henry Topp.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1890, in the year that John Henry Thoma Topp was born, on December 29th, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred in South Dakota on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation . The U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment said that they rode into the Lakota camp "trying to disarm" the inhabitants. One person, Black Coyote - who was deaf - held onto his rifle, saying that he paid a lot of money for it. Shots rang out and by the end at least 153 Lakota Sioux - some estimates say 300 - and 25 troops had died. The site of the massacre is a National Historic Landmark.

In 1926, at the age of 36 years old, John was alive when on November 15th, NBC was founded. It was the U.S.'s first major broadcast network. Ownership of the network was split between RCA (a majority partner at 50%), its founding corporate parent General Electric (which owned 30%), and Westinghouse (which owned the remaining 20%).

In 1931, John was 41 years old when on May 1st, the Empire State Building opened in New York City. At 1,454 feet (including the roof and antenna), it was the tallest building in the world until the World Trade Center's North Tower was built in 1970. (It is now the 34th tallest.) Opening at the beginning of the Great Depression, most of the offices in the Empire State Building remained unoccupied for years and the observation deck was an equal source of revenue and kept the building profitable.

In 1951, he was 61 years old when on February 27th, the 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution (which limited the number of terms a president may serve to two) was ratified by 36 states, making it a part of the U.S. Constitution. The Amendment was both a reaction to the 4 term Roosevelt presidency and also the recognition of a long-standing tradition in American politics.

In 1962, in the year of John Henry Thoma Topp's passing, on October 1st, African-American James H. Meredith, escorted by federal marshals, registered at the University of Mississippi - becoming the first African-American student admitted to the segregated college. He had been inspired by President Kennedy's inaugural address to apply for admission.

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