John Lear (1865 - 1922)

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John Lear
1865 - 1922
Born
1865
Death
1922
Mpna, Australia
Last Known Residence
Mpna, Australia
Summary
John Lear was born in 1865. He was born to Lear Henry Lear and Agnes Jane Mcgregor Lear. He died in 1922 in Mpna, Australia at age 57.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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John Lear
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John Lear
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Mpna, Australia
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John Lear died in in Mpna, Australia
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John Lear was born in
John Lear died in in Mpna, Australia
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John Lear died in 1922 in Mpna, Australia at age 57. He was born in 1865. He was born to Lear Henry Lear and Agnes Jane Mcgregor Lear.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during John's lifetime.

In 1865, in the year that John Lear was born, on April 14th, President Abraham Lincoln was shot while attending a comedy at Ford's Theatre - Our American Cousin - in Washington, D.C. Actor and Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth shot him 4 days after Lee had surrendered. The President died the next day. At almost the same time that Lincoln was shot, US Secretary of State William H. Seward and his family were attacked at home by another conspirator and Confederate sympathizer.

In 1897, John was 32 years old when on September 21st, editor and publisher Francis P. Church responded to a letter to the editor from Virginia O'Hanlon, 8 years old. Virginia's father had told her that "If you see it in The Sun, it's so." So she wrote to the Sun, asking if there was a Santa Claus. Church responded with the now famous editorial "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus".

In 1906, by the time he was 41 years old, President Theodore Roosevelt received the Nobel Prize for Peace. The award was considered controversial at the time because many thought that he was an imperialist. But he had brokered peace between Russia and Japan a year previous and had allowed a dispute between Mexico and the U.S. to go to arbitration, resolving the issue peacefully rather than resorting to military conflict. For these two reasons, the Nobel Prize committee chose him for the Peace Prize.

In 1917, when he was 52 years old, "I Want You" became famous. James Montgomery Flagg's poster, featuring Uncle Sam and based on a 1914 British poster, attracted thousands of U.S. recruits to WWI duty. Over 4 million posters were printed in 1917 and 1918.

In 1922, in the year of John Lear's passing, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. on May 30th. More than 35,000 people attended the dedication including Lincoln's son, Robert Todd Lincoln, and many Union and Confederate veterans - although the audience was segregated. The Memorial took 10 years to complete.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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