Joseph Nies (1900 - 1980)

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Joseph Nies
1900 - 1980
Born
March 4, 1900
Death
May 1980
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
Summary
Joseph Nies was born on March 4, 1900. He died in May 1980 at age 80. We know that Joseph Nies had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Joseph Nies
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504
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Joseph Nies passed away in May 1980 at age 80. He was born on March 4, 1900. There is no information about Joseph's family or relationships. We know that Joseph Nies had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16504.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Joseph's lifetime.

In 1900, in the year that Joseph Nies was born, the Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud published his book (written in 1899) "The Interpretation of Dreams". Sigmund Freud, born Sigismund Schlomo Freud in May of 1856, is the "father of psychoanalysis". Although he was a medical doctor, he was fascinated with the psyche and hypothesized the existence of the id, the ego, the superego, the libido, the unconscious, the Oedipus complex, and more. These are concepts that are still used by modern psychology.

In 1938, when he was 38 years old, on June 25th (a Saturday) the Fair Labor Standards Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt (along with 120 other bills). The Act banned oppressive child labor, set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and established the maximum workweek at 44 hours. It faced a lot of opposition and in fighting for it, Roosevelt said "Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day, ...tell you...that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry."

In 1954, when he was 54 years old, on May 17th, the Supreme Court released a decision on Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. The ruling stated that state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students was unconstitutional thus paving the way for integration in schools.

In 1978, at the age of 78 years old, Joseph was alive when on July 25th, Louise Brown, the first "test-tube baby", was born at Oldham Hospital in London. Louise was conceived through IVF (in vitro fertilization), a controversial and experimental procedure at the time.

In 1980, in the year of Joseph Nies's passing, on December 8th, ex-Beatle John Lennon was shot and killed by Mark David Chapman in front of his home - the Dakota - in New York City. Chapman was found guilty of murder and still remains in jail.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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