Kenneth H Banister (1916 - 2011)

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Kenneth H Banister
1916 - 2011
Born
April 9, 1916
Death
April 8, 2011
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16502
Summary
Kenneth H Banister was born on April 9, 1916. He died on April 8, 2011 at age 94. We know that Kenneth H Banister had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16502.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Kenneth H Banister
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16502
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Kenneth H Banister passed away on April 8, 2011 at 94 years of age. He was born on April 9, 1916. We are unaware of information about Kenneth's family. We know that Kenneth H Banister had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16502.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Kenneth's lifetime.

In 1916, in the year that Kenneth H Banister was born, in June, the U.S. Congress authorized a plan to expand the armed forces over the next five years. Called the National Defense Act of 1916, the national law expanded the National Guard and Army (the Army added an aviation unit), created the Reserves, and gave the President expanded authority to federalize the National Guard. It also allowed the government to stockpile, in advance, materiel to be used in wartime.

In 1922, at the age of just 6 years old, Kenneth was alive when the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. on May 30th. More than 35,000 people attended the dedication including Lincoln's son, Robert Todd Lincoln, and many Union and Confederate veterans - although the audience was segregated. The Memorial took 10 years to complete.

In 1963, when he was 47 years old, on November 22nd, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson became the 36th President of the United States when President John Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, Texas. Johnson was sworn in on the plane carrying Kennedy's body back to Washington D.C.

In 1970, by the time he was 54 years old, on May 4th, four students at Kent State University in Ohio were shot and killed by National Guardsmen. The students were at a peaceful demonstration protesting the invasion of Cambodia by US forces. There had been precedent for the killing of American college students. The previous year, on May 15th, Alameda County Sheriffs used shotguns against U.C. Berkeley students at a protest for People's Park. One student died, one was blinded, 128 were injured.

In 1984, by the time he was 68 years old, due to outrage about "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (it seemed too "dark" to many and it was rated PG), a new rating was devised - PG-13. The first film rated PG-13 was "Red Dawn".

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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