Leo Laughlin (1890 - 1975)

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Leo Laughlin
1890 - 1975
Born
February 27, 1890
Death
February 1975
Last Known Residence
Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16511
Summary
Leo Laughlin was born on February 27, 1890. He died in February 1975 at 84 years of age. We know that Leo Laughlin had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16511.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16511
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Leo Laughlin died in February 1975 at 84 years old. He was born on February 27, 1890. There is no information about Leo's surviving family. We know that Leo Laughlin had been residing in Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania 16511.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Leo's lifetime.

In 1890, in the year that Leo Laughlin was born, on October 9th, in Satory, France, the first fixed-wing, steam powered aircraft flew. "Ader √Čole" flew, uncontrolled, for about 160 ft. at a height of just under 8 inches off the ground.

In 1905, Leo was only 15 years old when the Niagara Falls conference was held in Fort Erie, Ontario. Led by W.E.B. Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter, a group of African-American men met in opposition to racial segregation and disenfranchisement. Booker T. Washington had been calling for policies of accommodation and conciliation and these two men, along with the others who attended the conference, felt that this was accomplishing nothing. The group was the precursor to the NAACP.

In 1938, he was 48 years old when on June 25th (a Saturday) the Fair Labor Standards Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt (along with 120 other bills). The Act banned oppressive child labor, set the minimum hourly wage at 25 cents, and established the maximum workweek at 44 hours. It faced a lot of opposition and in fighting for it, Roosevelt said "Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day, ...tell you...that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry."

In 1952, Leo was 62 years old when on July 2, Dr. Jonas E. Salk tested the first dead-virus polio vaccine on 43 children. The worst epidemic of polio had broken out that year - in the U.S. there were 58,000 cases reported. Of these, 3,145 people had died and 21,269 were left with mild to disabling paralysis.

In 1975, in the year of Leo Laughlin's passing, in January, Popular Mechanics featured the Altair 8800 on it's cover. The Altair home computer kit allowed consumers to build and program their own personal computers. Thousands were sold in the first month.

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