Lon Tappen Collier

(1931 - 1994)

A photo of Lon Tappen Collier
Lon Tappen Collier
1931 - 1994
Born
October 5, 1931
Death
July 11, 1994
Last Known Residence
zip code 22024
Summary
Lon Tappen Collier was born on October 5, 1931. He died on July 11, 1994 at 62 years old. We know that Lon Tappen Collier had been residing in zip code 22024.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Biography
Lon Tappen Collier
Most commonly known name
Lon Tappen Collier
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
zip code 22024
Last known residence
Male
Gender
Lon Collier was born on
Birth
Lon Collier died on
Death
Lon Collier was born on
Lon Collier died on
Birth
Death
Quantico National Cemetery Section 6 Site 305 18424 Joplin Road (route 619), in Triangle, Virginia 22172
Burial / Funeral
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Military Service

Branch of service: Us Air Force
Rank attained: SSGT
Wars/Conflicts: Vietnam
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

Lon's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Collier family tree.

Lon's Family

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Lon Tappen Collier
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Lon Tappen Collier passed away on July 11, 1994 at 62 years old. He was buried in Quantico National Cemetery Section 6 Site 305, Triangle, Virginia. He was born on October 5, 1931. There is no information about Lon's family or relationships. We know that Lon Tappen Collier had been residing in zip code 22024.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Lon's lifetime.

In 1931, in the year that Lon Tappen Collier was born, in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1949, at the age of 18 years old, Lon was alive when comedian Milton Berle hosted the first telethon show. It raised $1,100,000 for cancer research and lasted 16 hours. The next day, newspapers, in writing about the event, first used the word "telethon."

In 1966, at the age of 35 years old, Lon was alive when on September 8th, the first Star Trek episode, "The Man Trap," was broadcast on NBC. The plot concerned a creature that sucked salt from human bodies. The original series only aired for 3 seasons due to low ratings.

In 1971, Lon was 40 years old when in March, Intel shipped the first microprocessor to Busicom, a Japanese manufacturer of calculators. The microprocessor has since allowed computers to become smaller and faster, leading to smaller and more versatile handheld devices, home computers, and supercomputers.

In 1994, in the year of Lon Tappen Collier's passing, on May 6th, the Channel Tunnel or "Chunnel" was officially opened. The Chunnel is a railway tunnel beneath the English Channel that connects Great Britain to mainland France. Original plans for such a tunnel were developed in 1802 and approved by Napoleon Bonaparte but the British rejected the plan fearing that Napoleon would use the railway to invade.

Other Colliers

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Nov 3, 1931 - Feb 24, 2003 1931 - 2003
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Aug 29, 1930 - Aug 1974 1930 - 1974
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Jul 19, 1930 - Mar 1987 1930 - 1987
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Mar 13, 1931 - May 11, 2007 1931 - 2007
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Jun 9, 1919 - Sep 29, 2003 1919 - 2003
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Jul 10, 1897 - Dec 1983 1897 - 1983
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Feb 12, 1933 - May 1, 1990 1933 - 1990
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Feb 23, 1887 - Aug 1976 1887 - 1976
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May 25, 1895 - Jun 1984 1895 - 1984
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May 15, 1899 - Aug 1978 1899 - 1978
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Jan 13, 1933 - Mar 21, 2007 1933 - 2007
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Jan 6, 1932 - Jun 15, 1992 1932 - 1992
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Oct 4, 1934 - Jul 26, 2010 1934 - 2010
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May 16, 1935 - Aug 1, 2000 1935 - 2000
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Apr 18, 1901 - Oct 1974 1901 - 1974
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May 9, 1935 - Sep 8, 2005 1935 - 2005
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Feb 4, 1933 - Nov 4, 2007 1933 - 2007
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Aug 29, 1933 - May 22, 2011 1933 - 2011

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Jan 1, 1930 - Feb 15, 1992 1930 - 1992
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Jan 2, 1902 - Aug 1980 1902 - 1980
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May 5, 1899 - Aug 1977 1899 - 1977
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Aug 15, 1909 - Jul 1, 1999 1909 - 1999
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Dec 4, 1927 - Dec 6, 1997 1927 - 1997
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Apr 2, 1884 - Apr 15, 1973 1884 - 1973
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Oct 1, 1919 - Feb 26, 1998 1919 - 1998
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Jul 1, 1923 - Jan 16, 2006 1923 - 2006
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Jun 14, 1914 - Jun 1981 1914 - 1981
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Jan 18, 1897 - Nov 1979 1897 - 1979
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Sep 26, 1879 - Mar 1964 1879 - 1964
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Dec 27, 1924 - Jun 15, 1995 1924 - 1995
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Jun 4, 1922 - Oct 5, 2006 1922 - 2006
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Jun 12, 1878 - May 1967 1878 - 1967
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Nov 16, 1930 - Nov 4, 2007 1930 - 2007
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Sep 17, 1929 - Feb 18, 2006 1929 - 2006
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Sep 24, 1931 - Mar 7, 2007 1931 - 2007
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Jan 11, 1930 - Oct 8, 2001 1930 - 2001
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Oct 19, 1900 - Dec 1986 1900 - 1986
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