Lottie Wood (1877 - 1969)

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Lottie Wood
1877 - 1969
Born
March 10, 1877
Death
April 1969
Last Known Residence
Holdrege, Phelps County, Nebraska 68949
Summary
Lottie Wood was born on March 10, 1877. She died in April 1969 at 92 years of age. We know that Lottie Wood had been residing in Holdrege, Phelps County, Nebraska 68949.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Lottie Wood
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Holdrege, Phelps County, Nebraska 68949
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Lottie Wood passed away in April 1969 at age 92. She was born on March 10, 1877. We are unaware of information about Lottie's family or relationships. We know that Lottie Wood had been residing in Holdrege, Phelps County, Nebraska 68949.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Lottie's lifetime.

In 1877, in the year that Lottie Wood was born, on July 14th, strikes and resulting riots began at the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad. A sympathy strike and rioting began in Pittsburgh and a worker's rebellion began in St. Louis, then spread to other cities. 100 people were killed before the strikes ended when President Rutherford B. Hayes sent federal troops to each of the cities involved.

In 1902, at the age of 25 years old, Lottie was alive when about 150 thousand United Mine Workers went on strike in eastern Pennsylvania for a wage increase and more suitable hours. They eventually got a 10% raise and their workday was reduced from 10 hours to 9. Because winter was coming and most people at the time heated their homes with coal, President Teddy Roosevelt arbitrated between the owners and the workers - the first time that the Federal government arbitrated in a strike.

In 1919, when she was 42 years old, Indian lawyer Mahatma Gandhi initiated the Satyagraha campaigns, beginning the nonviolent resistance movement against British rule of India. Satyagraha means "holding onto truth" and the campaign for India independence, which was eventually obtained, called for "self-suffering" rather than inflicting suffering (i.e., violence) on others.

In 1947, by the time she was 70 years old, on November 25th, the Hollywood "Black List" was created by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Ten Hollywood writers and directors had refused to testify to the Committee regarding "Communists" or "Reds" in the movie industry. The next day, the blacklist was created and they were fired.

In 1969, in the year of Lottie Wood's passing, on July 20th, the first men walked on the moon. Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. both walked on the moon but it was Armstrong who first stepped on the moon. They fulfilled the promise of President Kennedy's commitment in 1961 to put a man on the moon before the end of the decade.

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