Marcus Mann (1845 - 1933)

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Marcus Mann
1845 - 1933
Born
c. 1845
Death
January 16, 1933
Queens County, New York United States
Summary
Marcus Mann was born c. 1845. He died on January 16, 1933 in New York at age 88.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Marcus Mann
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Marcus Mann died on in Queens County, New York United States
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Marcus Mann was born
Marcus Mann died on in Queens County, New York United States
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Marcus Mann died on January 16, 1933 in New York at age 88. He was born c. 1845. There is no information about Marcus's family or relationships.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Marcus' lifetime.

In 1845, in the year that Marcus Mann was born, on December 29th, Texas was admitted as the 28th state. Formerly part of Mexico, then an independent Republic, Texas consisted mainly of American settlers - English speaking - in the north and former Mexican citizens - Spanish speaking - in the south and west when admitted to the Union.

In 1856, at the age of only 11 years old, Marcus was alive when on May 21st, Lawrence Kansas was ransacked and burned by pro-slavery forces. Called the "Sacking of Lawrence", it was part of the "Bleeding Kansas" war between pro-slavery and antislavery settlers.

In 1906, at the age of 61 years old, Marcus was alive when abolitionist and suffragette leader Susan B. Anthony died, before women's right to vote nationally was realized (in 1920). She, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, founded the National American Woman Suffrage Association which later became the League of Women Voters. She died at the age of 86 of heart failure and pneumonia in her home in New York.

In 1910, at the age of 65 years old, Marcus was alive when Angel Island, which is in San Francisco Bay, became the immigration center for Asians entering U.S. It was often referred to as "The Ellis Island of the West". Due to restrictive laws against Chinese immigration, many immigrants spent years on the island.

In 1933, in the year of Marcus Mann's passing, Frances Perkins became the first woman to hold a cabinet-level position, appointed by President Roosevelt to serve as Secretary of Labor. She told him that her priorities would be a 40-hour work week, a minimum wage, unemployment compensation, worker’s compensation, abolition of child labor, direct federal aid to the states for unemployment relief, Social Security, a revitalized federal employment service, and universal health insurance. President Roosevelt approved of all of them and most them were implemented during his terms as President. She served until his death in 1945.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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