Margaret Ella May Mackie

(1896 - 1953)

A photo of Margaret Ella May Mackie
Margaret Ella May Mackie
1896 - 1953
Born
1896
Death
1953
Sth Melb, Australia
Last Known Residence
Sth Melb, Australia
Summary
Margaret Ella May Mackie was born in 1896. She was born to Campbell James Mackie and Sarah Burke Mackie. She died in 1953 in Sth Melb, Australia at 57 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Biography
Margaret Ella May Mackie
Most commonly known name
Margaret Ella May Mackie
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Sth Melb, Australia
Last known residence
Female
Gender
Margaret Mackie was born in
Birth
Margaret Mackie died in in Sth Melb, Australia
Death
Margaret Mackie was born in
Margaret Mackie died in in Sth Melb, Australia
Birth
Death
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood
Obituary

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Life Expectancy

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Margaret Ella May Mackie passed away in 1953 in Sth Melb, Australia at 57 years old. She was born in 1896. She was born to Campbell James Mackie and Sarah Burke Mackie.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Margaret's lifetime.

In 1896, in the year that Margaret Ella May Mackie was born, in April, the first study on global warming due to CO2 - carbon dioxide - in the atmosphere was published by Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius. Arrhenius concluded that human activity due to the Industrial Revolution would amplify CO2 in the atmosphere, causing a greenhouse effect. His conclusions have been extensively tested in the ensuing 100+ years and are still seen to hold true.

In 1902, Margaret was merely 6 years old when the Aswan Low Dam (the old Aswan Dam) began construction in Egypt in 1899 and was completed in 1902 - making it the largest masonry dam in the world at the time. The dam was built on the Nile River in order to conserve water and regulate flooding, allowing for population increase along the Nile.

In 1914, at the age of 18 years old, Margaret was alive when in only his second big-screen appearance, Charlie Chaplin played the Little Tramp, his most famous character. The silent film was made in January and released the following year. Of the character, Chaplin said: "On the way to the wardrobe I thought I would dress in baggy pants, big shoes, a cane and a derby hat. I wanted everything a contradiction: the pants baggy, the coat tight, the hat small and the shoes large." The moustache was added to age his 24-year-old face without masking his expressions.

In 1935, Margaret was 39 years old when the BOI's name (the Bureau of Investigation) was changed to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) and it officially became a separate agency with the Department of Justice. J. Edgar Hoover, the Chief of the BOI, continued in his office and became the first Director of the FBI. The FBI's responsibility is to "detect and prosecute crimes against the United States".

In 1953, in the year of Margaret Ella May Mackie's passing, actress and comedian Lucille Ball gave birth to Desi Arnaz, Jr on January 19th. On the same day on "I Love Lucy", the fictional Little Ricky was born as well. Baby Desi graced the cover of the first TV Guide magazine with a headline that read ""Lucy's $50,000,000 baby" - because the commercial revenue from his birth was expected to be that amount.

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1942 - 1983 1942 - 1983
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1909 - 1983 1909 - 1983
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1909 - 1983 1909 - 1983
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