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Margaret Ermarth (1908 - 1977)

A photo of Margaret Ermarth
Margaret Lucille (Sittler) Ermarth Dr.
1908 - 1977
Born
September 7, 1908
Death
July 19, 1977
Saluda, North Carolina, United States
Other Names
Doctor Margaret Sittler Ermarth
Summary
Margaret Lucille (Sittler) Ermarth Dr. of Springfield, Clark County, Ohio was born on September 7, 1908, and died at age 68 years old on July 19, 1977 in Saluda, North Carolina United States.
Updated: August 31, 2022
Biography ID: 72534654

Margaret Ermarth's Biography

Family, friend, or fan this Collaborative Biography is for you to show & tell Margaret's life so that she is always remembered.
About Margaret

Introduction

Dr. Margaret Lucille (Sittler) Ermarth was born on Sep 7, 1908 to Dr. Joseph Andrew Sittler (Mar 3, 1876-Jun 26, 1961) and Minnie Lillian Veith (Jun 25, 1874-Jun 9, 1965). She had sister Mary Saler, and brothers Louis, Loring, Charles, Rev. Dr. Joseph, Edward, Karl, and Walter.

Dr. Margaret Sittler Ermarth was married to Dr. Fritz Ermarth and they had two sons Fritz and Dr. Michael Ermarth. See Marriage of Former Resident Announced for more details.

Dr. Ermarth began teaching at the Wittenberg university in 1953, became a professor of history in 1962, and retired in June 1974. She was very active in her community including at the Fourth Lutheran Church.

She was well travelled and worked at the University of Berlin, the University of Hamburg, and in Russia. She is the author of "Adam's Fractured Rib" published in 1970.

For a more complete list of Dr. Ermarth's impressive accomplishments see Margaret Ermarth: Obituary.
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Margaret Ermarth
Most commonly known as
Margaret Lucille (Sittler) Ermarth Dr.
Full legal name
Doctor Margaret Sittler Ermarth
Other names or aliases

Name & aliases

Springfield, Clark County, Ohio 45504
Last place lived

Last residence

September 7, 1908
Birthday
Unknown
Birth location

Birth details

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Ethnicity & Family History

Dr. Margaret Ermarth was Caucasian.

Nationality & Locations

Margaret moved around a lot including living in Springfield, Clark, Ohio, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, California, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Washington, District of Columbia, and Henderson, North Carolina. She also studied at the University of Berlin, the University of Hamburg, and in Russia.

Education

Dr. Margaret Ermarth graduated from Wittenberg College in Springfield Ohio, in 1930. The and following year in 1931, she traveled to Hamberg, Germany and became an exchange student at the University of Hamberg. She then studied and received her master's degree from Ohio State University in 1932.

Religion

dd/mm/yyyy
Baptism date
Unknown
Place of worship

Baptism date & location

Margaret was Lutheran and heavily involved with the church. Her book "Adam's Fractured Rib" was a result of her service as chairwoman of a group that had been studying the role of women in the church for the Lutheran Church in America. See Lutheran Church of America Convention June 29, 1970 for a copy of Margaret's speech at the Lutheran Convention in 1970.

Professions

From 1933 through 1936 Margaret was a research and editorial writer for the American Council of Learned Societies, and then from 1936 through 1938 was an historical analyst for the National Archives in Washington D.C. Dr. Margaret Sittler Ermarth was professor emerita of history and former member of the board of directors at Wittenberg University. She taught at the university from 1953 until June 1974. She was also the author of "Adam's Fractured Rib" published in 1970.

Personal Life

She was married Dr. Fritz Ermarth on Sep 2, 1935 in Grand Beach Michigan.

Military Service

Did Margaret serve in the military or did a war or conflict interfere with her life?
July 19, 1977
Death date
Lengthy illness
Cause of death
Saluda, North Carolina United States
Death location

Death details

dd/mm/yyyy
Funeral date
Grave or burial unknown
Burial location

Gravesite & burial

Obituary

The following appeared in Springfield News-Sun in Springfield Ohio on Wednesday July 20th 1977: Dr. Margaret Ermarth Dies At Age 68 Dr. Margaret Sittler Ermarth, professor emerita of history and former member of the board of directors at Wittenberg University, died at noon Tuesday in her home in Saluda, N.C., following a lengthy illness. She was 68. A 1930 graduate of Wittenberg, Dr. Ermarth returned to teach at the university in 1953 with the rank of associate professor of history. She was promoted to professor in 1962. In June of 1974, she retired from the university after 24 years of distinguished service which included selection as the first recipient of the Wittenberg Alumni Association's Distinguished Teaching Award in 1961. The Class of 1914 Meritorious Service Award was presented to her in 1972 in honor of her outstanding contributions to the life of Wittenberg. This past March she was awarded the Wittenberg Medal of Honor which recognizes persons who exhibit special dedication to the university as a liberal arts institution. Dr. Ermarth was an active participant in Springfield organizations and at Fourth Lutheran Church. The Pilot Club of Springfield named her "Woman of the Year" in 1973. Elected to the university's board of directors in 1974, she served until December, 1976. The Wittenberg University history department established the Margaret S. Ermarth Award in 1975 to recognize students of outstanding scholarship. The honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree was presented to Dr. Ermarth in 1972 by Fustavus Adolphus College of St. Peter, Minn., where she had taught for six years prior to joining the Wittenberg faculty. She was elected to the board of directors of Gustavus Adolphus in 1974. In addition to a master of arts degree earned at Ohio State University, Dr. Ermarth had also completed work at the University of Berlin, the University of Hamburg, and in Russia. She was the author of "Adam's Fractured Rib," published in 1970. The book was an outgrowth of her service as chairwoman of a group that had been studying the role of women in the church for the Lutheran Church in America. Her contributions to the church also included appointment to the Commission for Comprehensive Study of Doctrine of the Ministry of the Lutheran Church in America, and election to the LCA's Division for Mission in North America. Before entering the academic field, she served from 1933-1936 as a research and editorial writer for the American Council of Learned Societies, and from 1936 to 1938 as an historical analyst for the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Survivors include two sons, Fritz Ermarth of McLean, Va., and Dr. Michael Ermarth of Hanover, N.H.; two grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. Mary Saler of Tucson, Ariz., and four brothers, Louis Sitler of Springfield, Charles Sittler of Kansas City, Mo., and the Rev. Dr. Joseph Sittler and Loring Sittler, both of Chicago. Her husband, Fritz, died in 1947, and two brothers, Edward and Walter, also are deceased. Private funeral services will be held in Saluda, N.C. Her body will be cremated. A memorial service will be held at Wittenberg University's Weaver Chapel near the opening of fall term classes.

Average Age & Life Expectancy

Margaret Ermarth lived 9 years shorter than the average Sittler family member when she died at the age of 68.
The average age of a Sittler family member is 77.
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Memories: Stories & Photos

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1971 Wittenberg University - Dr. Margaret S. Ermarth
The 1971 Wittenberg University yearbook photo of Dr. Margaret S. Ermarth. It reads: Margaret S. Ermarth, Professor; M.A., Ohio State University.
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Dr. Margaret Sittler Ermarth Obituary Photo
Photo from her obituary in The Springfield Daily News published on Wednesday July 20, 1977. Read the article here: Margaret Ermarth: Obituary.
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1968 Professor at Wittenberg University
From the 1968 Wittenberg University yearbook, on the page for History and Political Science:
Margaret Ermarth, Professor: A.B., Wittenberg: MA. , Ohio State University
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Lutheran Church of America Convention June 29, 1970
The following is a transcription of Dr. Margaret Sittler Ermarth's speech given at the Lutheran Church of America Convention on June 29th 1970 provided by St. Olaf College at [external link]

Thank you, I should like permission to address the assembly for about three minutes. Before the debate on its recommendations begins, this commission should like once more, as it has already done in its hearing session, to attempt to put its work, its deliberations in proper perspective and to point out once more the main thrust of its effort. I think this is particularly necessary not only for this assembly but also for the members of the press. I realize that I am treading on delicate ground here, treading very lightly perhaps in very heavy footsteps made by a very prominent federal official. Nevertheless, I would recommend to the press that instead of zeroing in on the volatile and interesting and important issue of the ordination of women exclusively, that it pay some attention -- along with the delegates to this convention -- to the rich matrix out of which this whole issue arose and to the objectives of our study which go far beyond the issue that is at stake tonight. (applause) I recommend to the delegates that they study, preceding the recommendations, the position statements, which clarify the purposes and language of the recommendations. And following the recommendations, a short position paper entitled “The Role of Women in the Life of the Church,” which is the work of a subcommittee of the commission charged with the problem of reviewing the problem of the ordination of women. Now the subcommittee determined from the beginning that the matter of the ordination of women could not be discussed in isolation. Therefore, a complete study of the role of women in the life of the church was undertaken against the background of the tumultuous social and cultural revolutions in our own society and throughout the world -- revolutions which certainly more than touch the churches and touch especially the lives of one half the human beings who happen to be female. And who constitute, among other things, one third the labor force of this country, a large part of the support of our churches, and constitute, I might add, 100% of the mothers, sisters, wives, and daughters of everybody here. (laughter). I should also hastily add that the distribution of these functions I thoroughly approve and hope we will maintain by a vote if necessary.

Now, conscious of the requirements of simple justice not egality in the sense of sameness, but equality in the very real sense. Conscious of a concept, a very real concept, of the freedom of the Christian. Conscious of the concept of the sacredness of human personality and promise, conscious of the ongoingness of God’s creative activity in the world, and conscious that the voice of the holy spirit cannot be confined by tradition, culture, doctrine, or sex, the commission has arrived at its conclusions. It should be obvious that the target of our efforts lies beyond the problems of the ordination of women. We have a right to hold that the Spirit which now might move us to emancipate one half of our fellowship into the fullest possible service in the church will also give us so illuminated and transcendent a vision of true community that our church may be strengthened for the enormous tasks that lie before us. Indeed, in which we are immersed.

We do indeed have reason to worry about identities. Man-woman relationships. Father-mother family relationships. The image of the pastor. The image of the woman in her role as a church worker. But, if we can manage to concentrate upon our true Christian identity, these other relationships -- so filled with beauty and so fraught with danger -- may rise to heights of transcendent creativity and acquire their true perspective. The Holy Spirit may indeed teach all of us what it means to be truly human and to work in true community. This vision at least we share in common. And to conclude my remarks I should like to quote Dr. Schiotz’s remarks this morning that “A new era of vigorous discipleship seems to be about to dawn.” I hope that women participate in it to the fullest of their abilities and to the extent of your wishes.
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Marriage of Former Resident Announced
Written in the Lancaster Eagle-Gazette (Lancaster, Ohio) on Wednesday August 28, 1935:

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Sittler, 299 Fifteenth Ave, Columbus, formerly of Lancaster, are announcing the marriage of their daughter, Margaret Lucille, to Dr. Fritz Ermarth of Washington D.C. The ceremony was read Monday in Grand Beach Mich, by the bride's father, Rev. Mr, Sittler. After the first of September, Dr. Ermarth and his bride will make their home in Washington at 1620 Sixteenth St.

Mrs. Ermarth was graduated from Wittenberg College, Springfield O, in 1930, and the following year was an exchange student at the University of Hamberg, Germany. She received her master's degree at Ohio State University in 1932, and for the past two years has been editorial assistant with the Dictionary of American Biography, Washington D.C.

Dr. Ermarth a native of Karisrube, Germany is a graduate of Heidelberg University and later received his Ph.D. degree at Harvard Law School. At present, he is research assistant with the national resources commission of Washington.
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Family Tree & Friends

Margaret's immediate relatives including parents, siblings, partnerships and children in the Ermarth family tree.

Margaret's Family Tree

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1908 - 1977 World Events

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Margaret's lifetime.

In 1908, in the year that Margaret Ermarth was born, President Theodore Roosevelt held the White House Conservation Conference, which lead to the establishment of the National Conservation Commission. Preparing the first inventory of the United State's natural resources, the commission was divided into four parts: water, forests, lands, and minerals.

In 1912, Margaret was merely 4 years old when in October, former President Theodore Roosevelt was shot, but not killed, while campaigning for another term as President with the newly created Bull Moose (Progressive) Party. John Schrank was a Bavarian-born saloon-keeper from New York who had been stalking Roosevelt when he shot him just before a campaign speech. Shot in the chest (and showing the audience his bloody shirt), Roosevelt went on to give a 55 to 90 minute talk (reports vary on the length) before being treated for the injury. After 8 days in the hospital, Roosevelt went back on the campaign trail.

In 1942, by the time she was 34 years old, on November 28th at 10:15p, a nightclub in Boston, the Cocoanut Grove, caught fire. The origins of the fire are unknown but it killed 492 people - the deadliest nightclub fire in U.S. history. Hundreds more were injured. The disaster was so shocking that it replaced World War II in the headlines and lead to reforms in safety standards and codes.

In 1965, by the time she was 57 years old, on March 8th, the first US combat troops arrived in Vietnam. The 3500 Marines joined 23,000 "advisors" already in South Vietnam. By the end of the year, 190,000 American soldiers were in the country.

In 1977, in the year of Margaret Ermarth's passing, on January 20th, Jimmy Carter became the 39th President of the United States. Running against incumbent Gerald Ford, he won 50.1% of the popular vote to Ford's 48.0%. He was elected to only one term.

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