Marie G Perkins (1918 - 1989)

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Marie G Perkins
1918 - 1989
Born
January 8, 1918
Death
January 17, 1989
Last Known Residence
zip code 92670
Summary
Marie G Perkins was born on January 8, 1918. She died on January 17, 1989 at 71 years old. We know that Marie G Perkins had been residing in zip code 92670.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Biography
Marie G Perkins
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Marie G Perkins
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zip code 92670
Last known residence
Female
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Marie Perkins was born on
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Marie Perkins died on
Death
Marie Perkins was born on
Marie Perkins died on
Birth
Death
Riverside National Cemetery Section F Site 305 22495 Van Buren Boulevard, in Riverside, California 92518
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Adulthood

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Branch of service: Us Army
Rank attained: SSGT
Wars/Conflicts: World War Ii

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Marie G Perkins passed away on January 17, 1989 at age 71. She was buried in Riverside National Cemetery Section F Site 305, Riverside, California. She was born on January 8, 1918. We have no information about Marie's family. We know that Marie G Perkins had been residing in zip code 92670.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Marie's lifetime.

In 1918, in the year that Marie G Perkins was born, on November 11th, an armistice was signed between the Allies and Germany, ending the fighting on the Western Front in World War I. This meant a complete defeat of Germany although Germany never formally surrendered. It took another six months of negotiations to sign an actual peace treaty between the warring parties.

In 1947, Marie was 29 years old when in June, the Marshall Plan was proposed to help European nations recover economically from World War II. It passed the conservative Republican Congress in March of 1948. After World War I, the economic devastation of Germany caused by burdensome reparations payments led to the rise of Hitler. The Allies didn't want this to happen again and the Marshall Plan was devised to make sure that those conditions didn't arise again.

In 1959, at the age of 41 years old, Marie was alive when on August 8th, Hawaii became the 50th state of the United States. The US flag was changed to show 50 stars.

In 1962, Marie was 44 years old when on October 1st, African-American James H. Meredith, escorted by federal marshals, registered at the University of Mississippi - becoming the first African-American student admitted to the segregated college. He had been inspired by President Kennedy's inaugural address to apply for admission.

In 1989, in the year of Marie G Perkins's passing, on March 24th, the Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker, struck a reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound and oil began spilling out of the hold. The oil would eventually contaminate more than a thousand miles of coastline. It is estimated that over 10.8 million gallons of crude oil spilled into the Sound - killing 100,000 to 250,000 seabirds, over 2,800 sea otters, about 12 river otters, 300 harbor seals, 247 bald eagles, and 22 orcas - as well as an unknown number of salmon and herring.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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