Mary E Oakley

(1843 - 1909)

A photo of Mary E Oakley
Mary E Oakley
1843 - 1909
Born
c. 1843
Death
October 3, 1909
Queens County, New York United States
Summary
Mary E Oakley was born c. 1843. She died on October 3, 1909 in New York at 66 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Biography
Mary E Oakley
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Mary E Oakley
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Mary Oakley was born
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Mary Oakley died on in Queens County, New York United States
Death
Mary Oakley was born
Mary Oakley died on in Queens County, New York United States
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Mary E Oakley died on October 3, 1909 in New York at 66 years of age. She was born c. 1843. We have no information about Mary's family or relationships.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Mary's lifetime.

In 1843, in the year that Mary E Oakley was born, on May 22nd, an estimated 700 to 1,000 pioneers set out from Missouri on the Oregon Trail. Called "The Great Migration of 1843", the wagon train often had to build roads or float down rivers.

In 1850, Mary was merely 7 years old when on July 10th, President Millard Fillmore - previously Vice-President to Zachary Taylor - became the 13th President of the United States. Taylor had become ill with a still unknown intestinal ailment on July 4th and died on July 9th as a result. He had been a little over a year into his term.

In 1863, when she was 20 years old, on June 20th, West Virginia was admitted as the 35th state of the United States. West Virginia was formed when the pro-Union citizens in northwest Virginia wanted to separate from Virginia - which had joined the Confederacy.

In 1888, she was 45 years old when on January 12th, the 'Schoolhouse Blizzard' blanketed Dakota Territory. Montana, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas were hit, leaving 235 dead. Many of those who perished were children on their way home from school. The day was relatively warm when it began and the blizzard hit unexpectedly, catching most by surprise.

In 1909, in the year of Mary E Oakley's passing, Polish physician and medical researcher Paul Ehrlich found a cure for syphilis, which was a prevalent (but undiscussed) disease. He found that an arsenic compound completely cured syphilis within 3 weeks.

Other Mary Oakleys

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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1918 - 1992 1918 - 1992
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Jul 3, 1899 - August 1983 1899 - 1983
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1916 - 1981 1916 - 1981
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1887 - 1980 1887 - 1980
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1884 - 1976 1884 - 1976
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1895 - 1976 1895 - 1976
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1898 - 1964 1898 - 1964
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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1876 - 1963 1876 - 1963
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?

Other Oakleys

Bio
c. 1842 - Mar 20, 1923 1842 - 1923
Bio
c. 1833 - Oct 31, 1910 1833 - 1910
Bio
c. 1887 - Mar 26, 1894 1887 - 1894
Bio
c. 1841 - Nov 21, 1915 1841 - 1915
Bio
c. 1809 - Jan 23, 1891 1809 - 1891
Bio
c. 1888 - May 20, 1898 1888 - 1898
Bio
c. 1840 - Feb 20, 1902 1840 - 1902
Bio
c. 1876 - Mar 13, 1933 1876 - 1933
Bio
c. 1894 - Jan 28, 1913 1894 - 1913
Bio
c. 1854 - Mar 12, 1894 1854 - 1894
Bio
c. 1812 - Dec 5, 1898 1812 - 1898
Bio
c. 1890 - Mar 6, 1891 1890 - 1891
Bio
c. 1880 - Mar 25, 1906 1880 - 1906
Bio
c. 1880 - Mar 25, 1913 1880 - 1913
Bio
c. 1838 - Feb 12, 1916 1838 - 1916
Bio
c. 1879 - Jan 16, 1916 1879 - 1916
Bio
c. 1848 - Mar 26, 1891 1848 - 1891
Bio
c. 1847 - Nov 22, 1920 1847 - 1920
Bio
c. 1921 - Nov 12, 1922 1921 - 1922

Other Bios

Bio
c. 1842 - Mar 20, 1923 1842 - 1923
Bio
c. 1833 - Oct 31, 1910 1833 - 1910
Bio
c. 1887 - Mar 26, 1894 1887 - 1894
Bio
c. 1841 - Nov 21, 1915 1841 - 1915
Bio
c. 1809 - Jan 23, 1891 1809 - 1891
Bio
c. 1888 - May 20, 1898 1888 - 1898
Bio
c. 1840 - Feb 20, 1902 1840 - 1902
Bio
c. 1876 - Mar 13, 1933 1876 - 1933
Bio
c. 1894 - Jan 28, 1913 1894 - 1913
Bio
c. 1854 - Mar 12, 1894 1854 - 1894
Bio
c. 1812 - Dec 5, 1898 1812 - 1898
Bio
c. 1890 - Mar 6, 1891 1890 - 1891
Bio
c. 1880 - Mar 25, 1906 1880 - 1906
Bio
c. 1880 - Mar 25, 1913 1880 - 1913
Bio
c. 1838 - Feb 12, 1916 1838 - 1916
Bio
c. 1879 - Jan 16, 1916 1879 - 1916
Bio
c. 1848 - Mar 26, 1891 1848 - 1891
Bio
c. 1847 - Nov 22, 1920 1847 - 1920
Bio
c. 1921 - Nov 12, 1922 1921 - 1922
Bio
c. 1918 - Mar 3, 1919 1918 - 1919
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