Mary Elizabeth Cameron (1884 - 1959)

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Mary Elizabeth Cameron
1884 - 1959
Born
1884
Death
1959
Kew, Australia
Last Known Residence
Kew, Australia
Summary
Mary Elizabeth Cameron was born in 1884. She died in 1959 in Kew, Australia at 75 years of age.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Mary Elizabeth Cameron
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Mary Elizabeth Cameron
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Kew, Australia
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Mary Cameron died in in Kew, Australia
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Mary Cameron died in in Kew, Australia
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Mary Elizabeth Cameron died in 1959 in Kew, Australia at age 75. She was born in 1884. There is no information about Mary's family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Mary's lifetime.

In 1884, in the year that Mary Elizabeth Cameron was born, on May 1st, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions - a US association - first resolved that "eight hours shall constitute a legal day's labour from and after May 1, 1886, and that we recommend to labour organisations throughout this jurisdiction that they so direct their laws as to conform to this resolution by the time named." Previously, workdays would consist of 10 to 16 hours a day - 6 days a week. It would take years before the 8 hour workday became common practice - and longer before it became a law.

In 1911, by the time she was 27 years old, the Triangle Shirtwaist fire occurred, one of the deadliest industrial disasters in U.S. history. 146 workers (123 women and 23 men, many of them recent Jewish and Italian immigrants) died from the fire or by jumping to escape the fire and smoke. The garment factory was on the 8th, 9th, and 10th floors of a building in Greenwich Village in Manhattan. Doors to stairwells and exits had been locked in order to prevent workers from taking unauthorized breaks and to prevent theft, so they couldn't escape by normal means when the fire broke out. Due to the disaster, legislation was passed to protect sweatshop workers.

In 1921, she was 37 years old when in May, the Emergency Quota Act - or Emergency Immigration Act - was passed. The law restricted the number of immigrants to 357,000 per year. It also established an immigration quota in which only 3 per cent of the total population of any ethnic group already in the USA in 1910, could be admitted to America after 1921. Although the Act was supposed to be temporary, it stayed in effect until 1965.

In 1935, when she was 51 years old, the BOI's name (the Bureau of Investigation) was changed to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) and it officially became a separate agency with the Department of Justice. J. Edgar Hoover, the Chief of the BOI, continued in his office and became the first Director of the FBI. The FBI's responsibility is to "detect and prosecute crimes against the United States".

In 1959, in the year of Mary Elizabeth Cameron's passing, on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

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