Maude Nagle (1901 - 1967)

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Maude Nagle
1901 - 1967
Born
January 16, 1901
Death
November 1967
Last Known Residence
Pasco, Franklin County, Washington 99301
Summary
Maude Nagle was born on January 16, 1901. She died in November 1967 at age 66. We know that Maude Nagle had been residing in Pasco, Franklin County, Washington 99301.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Maude Nagle
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Pasco, Franklin County, Washington 99301
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Maude Nagle passed away in November 1967 at 66 years old. She was born on January 16, 1901. We have no information about Maude's family or relationships. We know that Maude Nagle had been residing in Pasco, Franklin County, Washington 99301.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Maude's lifetime.

In 1901, in the year that Maude Nagle was born, Edward VII succeeded Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria of England had become Queen in 1837 and reigned until her death in 1901. Her 63 year reign was the longest in history prior to Elizabeth II who recently broke her record. The time during which she led the country was known as the Victorian era and she presided over great changes in the United Kingdom, including the expansion of the British Empire and the Industrial Revolution.

In 1936, at the age of 35 years old, Maude was alive when on November 3rd, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was reelected to a second term. He ran against Republican Governor Alf Landon (Kansas), defeating Landon in the popular vote by 60.8% to 36.5%. Vermont and Maine were the only two states in which Landon won. John Nance Garner IV became the Vice-President in this election.

In 1940, at the age of 39 years old, Maude was alive when on September 16th, the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, was enacted - the first peacetime draft in U.S. history. Men between 21 and 36 were required to register with their draft boards. When World War II began, men between 18 and 45 were subject to service and men up to 65 were required to register.

In 1953, she was 52 years old when on July 27th, the Korean Armistice Agreement was signed. The Armistice was to last until "a final peaceful settlement is achieved". No peaceful settlement has ever been agreed upon.

In 1967, in the year of Maude Nagle's passing, on October 2nd, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first black US Supreme Court justice. Marshall was the great-grandson of a slave and graduated first in his class at Howard University Law School. His nomination to the Supreme Court was approved by the Senate, 69 to 11.

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