Nan Martin (1927 - 2010)

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Nan Martin
BIRTH 15 Jul 1927
Decatur, Macon County, Illinois, USA
DEATH 4 Mar 2010 (aged 82)
Malibu, Los Angeles County, California, USA
BURIAL Cremated, Ashes given to family.
MEMORIAL ID 49090047 · View Source
Actress. She appeared in a large number of film, stage, and television productions over a half-century career. Raised in Santa Monica, California, she got her theatrical start in a campus presentation of "The Gentle People" while a student at UCLA. Working as a fashion model for Adrian, she financed a move to New York, where she made her Broadway bow in the 1950 "A Story for a Sunday Evening". Over the years Martin had a long list of credits on The Great White Way, including 1958's "J.B." (which earned her a Tony nomination), "Under the Yum Yum Tree", and "The Eccentricities of a Nightingale". Her big screen debut came with "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" (1956), to be followed by such films as "Toys in the Atic" (1963), 1975's "The Other Side of the Mountain" (along with its 1978 sequel), and the 1987 "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors". She was often cast in "mother" parts, which led to probably her best known screen role, that of Ali MacGraw's snobby, unpleasant, mother in 1969's "Goodbye Columbus". Martin also did extensive television work begining in the early 1950s, with her credits including "The Twilight Zone", "Ben Casey", "The Untouchables", "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation", "The Golden Girls", and "NYPD Blue". She was in the the 1983 "The Thorn Birds", the evening soap "Santa Barbara", and had the recurring role of Mrs. Louder on "The Drew Carey Show". Martin was to garner a number of awards, including a 1992 Los Angeles Drama Critic's Circle Award for "Odd Jobs", and Washington's Helen Hayes Award for the 1989 Kennedy Center presentation of "The Road to Mecca". Martin last appeared on the big screen in 2005's "Thicker Than Water"; she lived her final years in southern California, and died of complications of emphysema.
Bio by: Bob Hufford

Nan Martin Biography & Family History

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Nan Martin was also known as:

Nan Clow Gesner (Martin)

Birth

Death

on in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California United States
Cause of death: Emphysema

Cause of death

Emphysema

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Obituary

Last Known Residence

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Average Age

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Family

Husband: Harry Gesner

Education

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Professions

Selected filmography
The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit (1956) as Polly Lawrence (uncredited)
The Buster Keaton Story (1957) as Edna - Larry's Secretary
The Mugger (1958) as Claire Townsend
Toys in the Attic (1963) as Charlotte Warkins (uncredited)
Hamlet (1964) as Gertrude
Bus Riley's Back in Town (1965) as Mrs. Nichols
The Art of Love (1965) as Margo
For Love of Ivy (1968) as Doris Austin
Three in the Attic (1968) as Dean Nazarin
Goodbye, Columbus (1969) as Mrs. Ben Patimkin
The Young Nurses (1973) as Woman Reporter
The Other Side of the Mountain (1975) as June Kinmont
Jackson County Jail (1976) as Allison
The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 (1978) as June Kinmont
A Small Circle of Friends (1980) as Mrs. Baxter
Loving Couples (1980) as Walter's Nurse
Some Kind of Hero (1982) as Hilda
Doctor Detroit (1983) as Margaret Skridlow
All of Me (1984) as Divorce Lawyer
A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987) as Amanda Krueger / Maria Helena
Animal Behavior (1989) as Mrs. Norton
Pirates of Darkwater (voice only)
Last Gasp (1995) as Mrs. Hardwick
Big Eden (2000) as Widow Thayer
Forever Lulu (2000) as Lulu Look-Alike
Cast Away (2000) as Kelly's Mother
Shallow Hal (2001) as Nurse Tanya Peeler
Dancing at the Harvest Moon (2002) as Harriet Finnigan
Thicker than Water (2005) as Abygail Jordan
Greener Mountains (2005) as M

Organizations

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Military Service

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Middle name

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Maiden name

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Surnames

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Gender

Female

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Timeline

1927 - In the year that Nan Martin was born, aviator and media darling Charles Lindbergh, age 25, made the first successful solo TransAtlantic flight. "Lucky Lindy" took off from Long Island in New York and flew to Paris, covering  3,600 statute miles and flying for 33 1⁄2-hours. His plane "The Spirit of St. Louis" was a fabric-covered, single-seat, single-engine "Ryan NYP" high-wing monoplane designed by both Lindbergh and the manufacturer's chief engineer.

1944 - She was 17 years old when on June 22nd, the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, called the G.I. Bill, was signed into law, pushed through by the veteran's organizations. Benefits provided for veterans to return to school (high school, vocational school, or college), obtain low interest home mortgages and low interest business loans, and (if needed) one year of unemployment insurance. Since most returning vets immediately found work, less than 20% of the unemployment benefits were distributed.

1948 - She was 21 years old when on May 14th, the State of Israel was proclaimed by David Ben-Gurion, who became Israel's first Premier, and the U.S. officially recognized Israel. That evening, Egypt launched an air assault on Israel.

1965 - She was 38 years old when from August 11 to 16, riots broke out in Watts, a Black section of Los Angeles. An allegedly drunk African-American driver was stopped by LA police and, after a fight, police brutality was alleged - and the riots began. 34 people died in the rioting and over $40 million in property damage occurred. The National Guard was called in to help the LA police quell rioting.

1989 - Nan was 62 years old when on March 24th, the Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker, struck a reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound and oil began spilling out of the hold. The oil would eventually contaminate more than a thousand miles of coastline. It is estimated that over 10.8 million gallons of crude oil spilled into the Sound - killing 100,000 to 250,000 seabirds, over 2,800 sea otters, about 12 river otters, 300 harbor seals, 247 bald eagles, and 22 orcas - as well as an unknown number of salmon and herring.

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Obituary

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Nan Martin, an Actress Known for Her Strong Roles, Dies at 82
By WILLIAM GRIMES MARCH 9, 2010
Nan Martin, a veteran stage, television and film actress whose Broadway credits include “J.B.” and “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” and who played Ali McGraw’s snooty mother in the film “Goodbye, Columbus,” died on Thursday at her home in Malibu, Calif. She was 82.
The cause was complications of emphysema, said her son Casey Dolan.
Ms. Martin gained wide exposure in the late 1990s in the recurring role of the mean-spirited boss, Mrs. Louder, in the sitcom “The Drew Carey Show.”
She made her Broadway debut in 1950 in a short-lived play, “A Story for a Sunday Evening.” She went on to appear in numerous television films and television series, including “The Twilight Zone” and “The Untouchables,” and became a regular in Joseph Papp’s Shakespeare in the Park productions in the early 1960s.
She earned a Tony nomination for her performance as the wife, Sarah, in Archibald MacLeish’s verse drama “J.B.” (1958), directed by Elia Kazan. In “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” (1960), she played Irene Wilson, the divorcée who briefly attracts the roving eye of Gig Young.
Nan Martin in the HBO movie “Mrs. Harris,” from 2006. Credit Lorey Sebastian/HBO
In 1976 she returned to Broadway as Mrs. Buchanan in Tennessee Williams’s “Eccentricities of a Nightingale,” a reconceived version of his play “Summer and Smoke.” In his review for The New York Times, Clive Barnes wrote that she “glitters like a bejeweled snake as the awful mother.”
Nan Clow Martin was born in Decatur, Ill., on July 15, 1927, and grew up in Santa Monica, Calif. After acting in a student production at the University of California, Los Angeles, which she attended part time, and modeling for the fashion designer Adrian, she moved to New York.
Besides “The Drew Carey Show,” her many television credits include “NYPD Blue” and “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” and she appeared in the films “Toys in the Attic,” “For Love of Ivy” and “Shallow Hal,” among others.
Mothers were something of a specialty for Ms. Martin on television and in film, most memorably her role as Mrs. Ben Patimkin, who douses Richard Benjamin with cold contempt in “Goodbye, Columbus” (1969). She also played Freddy Krueger’s mother in “A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors” (1987).
Later in her career, Ms. Martin acted with the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Calif. Her performance as Miss Helen in Athol Fugard’s three-character “Road to Mecca” in 1989 led to an engagement in the same role opposite the playwright at the Kennedy Center in Washington.
Ms. Martin’s first marriage, to the screen composer Robert Emmett Dolan, ended in divorce. In addition to her son Casey, of Los Angeles, she is survived by her husband, Harry Gesner; another son, Zen Gesner of Malibu; and three grandsons.

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Nan Martin, an Actress Known for Her Strong Roles, Dies at 82
By WILLIAM GRIMESMARCH 9, 2010
Nan Martin, a veteran stage, television and film actress whose Broadway credits include “J.B.” and “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” and who played Ali McGraw’s snooty mother in the film “Goodbye, Columbus,” died on Thursday at her home in Malibu, Calif. She was 82.
The cause was complications of emphysema, said her son Casey Dolan.
Ms. Martin gained wide exposure in the late 1990s in the recurring role of the mean-spirited boss, Mrs. Louder, in the sitcom “The Drew Carey Show.”
She made her Broadway debut in 1950 in a short-lived play, “A Story for a Sunday Evening.” She went on to appear in numerous television films and television series, including “The Twilight Zone” and “The Untouchables,” and became a regular in Joseph Papp’s Shakespeare in the Park productions in the early 1960s.
She earned a Tony nomination for her performance as the wife, Sarah, in Archibald MacLeish’s verse drama “J.B.” (1958), directed by Elia Kazan. In “Under the Yum-Yum Tree” (1960), she played Irene Wilson, the divorcée who briefly attracts the roving eye of Gig Young.
Nan Martin in the HBO movie “Mrs. Harris,” from 2006. Credit Lorey Sebastian/HBO
In 1976 she returned to Broadway as Mrs. Buchanan in Tennessee Williams’s “Eccentricities of a Nightingale,” a reconceived version of his play “Summer and Smoke.” In his review for The New York Times, Clive Barnes wrote that she “glitters like a bejeweled snake as the awful mother.”
Nan Clow Martin was born in Decatur, Ill., on July 15, 1927, and grew up in Santa Monica, Calif. After acting in a student production at the University of California, Los Angeles, which she attended part time, and modeling for the fashion designer Adrian, she moved to New York.
Besides “The Drew Carey Show,” her many television credits include “NYPD Blue” and “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” and she appeared in the films “Toys in the Attic,” “For Love of Ivy” and “Shallow Hal,” among others.
Mothers were something of a specialty for Ms. Martin on television and in film, most memorably her role as Mrs. Ben Patimkin, who douses Richard Benjamin with cold contempt in “Goodbye, Columbus” (1969). She also played Freddy Krueger’s mother in “A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors” (1987).
Later in her career, Ms. Martin acted with the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Calif. Her performance as Miss Helen in Athol Fugard’s three-character “Road to Mecca” in 1989 led to an engagement in the same role opposite the playwright at the Kennedy Center in Washington.
Ms. Martin’s first marriage, to the screen composer Robert Emmett Dolan, ended in divorce. In addition to her son Casey, of Los Angeles, she is survived by her husband, Harry Gesner; another son, Zen Gesner of Malibu; and three grandsons.
Feb 23 · Reply

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