Nathan Fell (1760 - 1835)

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Nathan Fell
1760 - 1835
Born
April 5, 1760
Buckingham Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania
Death
October 12, 1835
Mercer County,Pennsylvania
Summary
Nathan Fell was born on April 5, 1760 at Buckingham Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania. He died on October 12, 1835 at Mercer County,Pennsylvania at age 75.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Nathan Fell
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Nathan Fell was born on at Buckingham Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania
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Nathan Fell died on at Mercer County,Pennsylvania
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Nathan Fell was born on at Buckingham Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania
Nathan Fell died on at Mercer County,Pennsylvania
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Nathan Fell died on October 12, 1835 at Mercer County,Pennsylvania at 75 years old. He was born on April 5, 1760 at Buckingham Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania. There is no information about Nathan's family or relationships.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Nathan's lifetime.

In 1806, by the time he was 46 years old, on April 18th, the U.S. Congress passed the Non-importation Act. The Act forbade the importation of numerous goods from Great Britain, which was impressing American sailors into British service. The hope that was by impacting the British economy, the U.S. could stop the warlike practices of the English.

In 1810, by the time he was 50 years old, in October, King George III of the United Kingdom - King of England during the American Revolutionary War - was recognized as insane. Although he reigned until his death in 1820, he was mentally ill - the cause is unknown - and in 1810 regency was established to oversee his rule. His eldest son was recognized as Prince Regent.

In 1815, at the age of 55 years old, Nathan was alive when on June 18th, the Battle of Waterloo was fought. Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher decisively defeated Napoleon's troops. The defeat at Waterloo ended Napoleon's rule as Emperor of the French. Napoleon would die in exile six years later.

In 1823, by the time he was 63 years old, on April 13th, Franz Liszt - who was 11 - gave a concert in Austria. After the concert, he was personally congratulated by Ludwig van Beethoven.

In 1835, in the year of Nathan Fell's passing, on January 30th, the first known attempt to kill a sitting President of the United States occurred just outside the United States Capitol Building. President Andrew Jackson was leaving the building after the funeral of South Carolina Representative Warren R. Davis. An Englishman, Richard Lawrence - who was unemployed and possibly mentally ill - stepped out and attempted to shoot. His gun misfired so he pulled out another gun - which also misfired. He was immediately caught.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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