Nellie Best (1914 - 1959)

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Nellie Best
1914 - 1959
Born
1914
Death
1959
Park, Australia
Last Known Residence
Park, Australia
Summary
Nellie Best was born in 1914. She was born to Rose Thomas Best and Eleanor Gerrard Best. She died in 1959 in Park, Australia at 45 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Nellie Best
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Nellie Best
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Park, Australia
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Nellie Best died in in Park, Australia
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Nellie Best was born in
Nellie Best died in in Park, Australia
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Nellie Best passed away in 1959 in Park, Australia at 45 years old. She was born in 1914. She was born to Rose Thomas Best and Eleanor Gerrard Best.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Nellie's lifetime.

In 1914, in the year that Nellie Best was born, in only his second big-screen appearance, Charlie Chaplin played the Little Tramp, his most famous character. The silent film was made in January and released the following year. Of the character, Chaplin said: "On the way to the wardrobe I thought I would dress in baggy pants, big shoes, a cane and a derby hat. I wanted everything a contradiction: the pants baggy, the coat tight, the hat small and the shoes large." The moustache was added to age his 24-year-old face without masking his expressions.

In 1922, at the age of merely 8 years old, Nellie was alive when the Reparations Commission assessed German liability for World War 1 at 132 billion gold marks (over $32 billion U.S. dollars at the time). This led to hyperinflation in Germany and created the political and social atmosphere in which Hitler was able to rise to power.

In 1938, when she was 24 years old, on October 30th, a Sunday, The Mercury Theatre on the Air broadcast Orson Welles' special Halloween show The War of the World's. A clever take on H.G. Wells' novel, the show began with simulated "breaking news" of an invasion by Martians. Because of the realistic nature of the "news," there was a public outcry the next day, calling for regulation by the FCC. Although the current story is that many were fooled and panicked, in reality very few people were fooled. But the show made Orson Welles' career.

In 1942, by the time she was 28 years old, on June 17th, Roosevelt approved the Manhattan Project, which lead to the development of the first atomic bomb. With the support of Canada and the United Kingdom, the Project came to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion. Julius Robert Oppenheimer, a nuclear physicist born in New York, led the Los Alamos Laboratory that developed the actual bomb. The first artificial nuclear explosion took place near Alamogordo New Mexico on July 16, 1945.

In 1959, in the year of Nellie Best's passing, on January 3rd, Alaska became the 49th state of the United States and the first state not a part of the contiguous United States. The flag was changed to display 49 stars.

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