Norman Roy Dale (1896 - 1959)

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Norman Roy Dale
1896 - 1959
Born
1896
Armadale, Australia
Death
1959
Arma, Australia
Last Known Residence
Armadale, Australia
Summary
Norman Roy Dale was born in 1896 in Armadale, Australia. He was born to Florence Jean (Lyon) Dale, with sibling Charles. He died in 1959 in Arma, Australia at 63 years old.
Updated: July 30, 2019
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Norman Roy Dale
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Norman Roy Dale
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Armadale, Australia
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Norman Dale was born in in Armadale, Australia
Birth
Norman Dale died in in Arma, Australia
Death
Norman Dale was born in in Armadale, Australia
Norman Dale died in in Arma, Australia
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Norman Roy Dale died in 1959 in Arma, Australia at 63 years old. He was born in 1896 in Armadale, Australia. He was born to Florence Jean (Lyon) Dale, with sibling Charles.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Norman's lifetime.

In 1896, in the year that Norman Roy Dale was born, on January 4th, Utah became the 45th state in the United States. After the LDS Church banned polygamy in 1890, Utah's application for statehood became acceptable to Congress and the Utah Territory became Utah..

In 1917, Norman was 21 years old when in April, the U.S. entered World War I, declaring war against Germany. President Wilson had previously declared neutrality in the war - a position supported by the majority of Americans - but after Germany declared that they would sink all ships trading with Great Britain and sunk U.S. ships, public opinion began to change. Then the Lusitania was sunk, killing 1,201 - including 128 Americans - and more U.S. ships were sunk. The U.S. could stand aside no longer.

In 1923, by the time he was 27 years old, the Teapot Dome scandal became the subject of an investigation by Senator Walsh and severely damaged the reputation of the Harding administration. Secretary of the Interior Albert Bacon Fall was convicted of accepting bribes from oil companies and became the first Cabinet member to go to prison. At the time, the Teapot Dome scandal was seen as "greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics".

In 1943, Norman was 47 years old when on June 20th through June 22nd, the Detroit Race Riot erupted at Belle Isle Park. The rioting spread throughout the city (made worse by false rumors of attacks on blacks and whites) and resulted in the deployment of 6,000 Federal troops. 34 people were killed, (25 of them black) - mostly by white police or National Guardsmen, 433 were wounded (75 percent of them black) and an estimated $2 million of property was destroyed. The same summer, there were riots in Beaumont, Texas and Harlem, New York.

In 1959, in the year of Norman Roy Dale's passing, on August 8th, Hawaii became the 50th state of the United States. The US flag was changed to show 50 stars.

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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