Paul W Stoltenberg

(1851 - 1915)

A photo of Paul W Stoltenberg
Paul W Stoltenberg
1851 - 1915
Born
c. 1851
Death
January 10, 1915
Manhattan County, New York United States
Summary
Paul W Stoltenberg was born c. 1851. He died on January 10, 1915 in New York at 64 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Paul W Stoltenberg
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Paul W Stoltenberg
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Paul Stoltenberg was born
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Paul Stoltenberg died on in Manhattan County, New York United States
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Paul Stoltenberg was born
Paul Stoltenberg died on in Manhattan County, New York United States
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Paul W Stoltenberg passed away on January 10, 1915 in New York at 64 years old. He was born c. 1851. We have no information about Paul's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Paul's lifetime.

In 1851, in the year that Paul W Stoltenberg was born, on March 27th, the first recorded visit of white men to Yosemite Valley occurred. The Mariposa Battalion, chasing Native Americans, went into the valley. One man, Dr. Lafayette Bunnell, wrote "the grandeur of the scene was but softened by the haze that hung over the valley -- light as gossamer -- and by the clouds which partially dimmed the higher cliffs and mountains. This obscurity of vision but increased the awe with which I beheld it, and as I looked, a peculiar exalted sensation seemed to fill my whole being, and I found my eyes in tears with emotion."

In 1874, by the time he was 23 years old, on September 14th, the Battle of Liberty Place occurred in New Orleans - the capital of Louisiana. Some members of the previous Confederate Army assembled for the purpose of "driving the usurpers from power" and the Republican Governor - William P. Kellogg - was physically driven from his office. The former Confederates temporarily replaced him with (the former) Democratic Governor John McEnery. Federal forces arrived, put down the insurrection, and five days later the legally elected government was restored.

In 1883, he was 32 years old when from August 26th through August 27th, Krakatoa - in Indonesia - erupted. 70% of the island - 163 villages - were destroyed and more than 36,400 people were killed by the eruption and the tsunami resulting from it. It was one of the deadliest volcanic eruptions ever.

In 1901, at the age of 50 years old, Paul was alive when shortly after beginning his second term, President McKinley was assassinated by the self proclaimed anarchist Leon Czolgosz. The last President to have served in the Civil War - he began as a private and ended the war as a brevet major - McKinley was a Republican. First elected in 1896, he was re-elected in 1900. Six months after the swearing in, McKinley was shot - and died of the gangrene that set in as a result.

In 1915, in the year of Paul W Stoltenberg's passing, the Germans first used poison gas as a weapon at the second Battle of Ypres during World War I. While noxious gases had been used since ancient times, this was the first use of poisonous gas - in this case, lethal chlorine gas - in modern war. Subsequently, the French and British - as well as the United States when they entered World War 1 - developed and used lethal gas in war.

Other Stoltenbergs

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c. 1885 - Feb 19, 1891 1885 - 1891
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Unknown - Unknown ? - ?
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Unknown - Dec 31, 1969 ? - 1969
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Unknown - Dec 31, 1969 ? - 1969
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Sep 19, 1942 - Mar 24, 1967 1942 - 1967
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Mar 2, 1923 - Jan 22, 1983 1923 - 1983

Other Bios

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c. 1902 - Jan 21, 1906 1902 - 1906
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c. 1866 - Mar 28, 1947 1866 - 1947
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c. 1833 - Jun 23, 1899 1833 - 1899
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c. 1871 - Dec 26, 1931 1871 - 1931
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c. 1927 - Jun 3, 1935 1927 - 1935
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c. 1920 - Apr 16, 1921 1920 - 1921
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c. 1852 - Aug 21, 1903 1852 - 1903
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c. 1851 - Apr 18, 1918 1851 - 1918
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c. 1904 - Apr 24, 1905 1904 - 1905
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c. 1862 - Jun 27, 1936 1862 - 1936
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c. 1844 - Jan 2, 1922 1844 - 1922
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c. 1899 - Nov 29, 1901 1899 - 1901
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c. 1873 - May 24, 1945 1873 - 1945
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c. 1860 - Nov 28, 1944 1860 - 1944
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c. 1903 - Apr 22, 1907 1903 - 1907
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c. 1872 - Apr 12, 1931 1872 - 1931
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c. 1902 - Jun 29, 1947 1902 - 1947
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