×

Popular Topics

Memories

Decades

People

Places

Military

Photography

Photos of Rosalie Gascoigne

Discover photos of Rosalie Gascoigne, her friends and family, and locations where she lived.

ADVERTISEMENT BY ANCESTRY.COM
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne's autographed poster and me in front of it.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne's first grandchild (with grandson & daughter in law)sent to me by her with one of her assemblages on the wall.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne's poster for the Venice Biennale 1981. Australians love to pose in front of it. Diana Goldsmith (left) and Amanda Stevenson (center)
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne's book MATERIAL AS LANDSCAPE.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne's three children: Toss Gascoigne, Hester Gascoigne and Martin Gascoigne.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
AUSTRALIAN BIOGRAPHY: ROSALIE GASCOIGNE YEAR: 1999 Rosalie Gascoigne (1917–1999) was interviewed by Robin Hughes for the Australian Biography series when she was 82 years old. Originally from New Zealand, Gascoigne spent much of her adult like in the Canberra/Monaro region. In this interview excerpt she describes her love for the Australian landscape and her process of discovering objects and materials. She fossicks for 'weathered, battered old things' to use in her artistic practice, finding the countryside 'confirming and exciting'. 'Anything could happen you see. It's marvellous. It's a wonderful freedom.' She explains that she's on the look out for vitality - the source of life - in the things she finds. She talks about how past experiences get woven into each work - 'It's not about how it looks it's about how you feel about it'. Beginning her artistic career when she was in her fifties, Gascoigne is best known for her poetic assemblages of mostly found objects. She was the first woman to represent Australia at the Venice Biennale in 1982. Gascoigne speaks about the pursuit of being an artist and how to avoid the trappings of vanity and egotism. Nature constantly reminds her of her place - 'You see things out in the countryside that are better than anything you can produce.' Elsewhere in the interview Gascoigne says 'I never considered myself an artist. I did what I did because I had to do it. Because I wanted to do it because I wanted something to look at.' Excerpt from Australian Biography: Rosalie Gascoigne, 1999 - Film Australia Collection © National Film and Sound Archive. Buy a copy at the NFSA shop.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
Rosalie Gascoigne said she didn't go in for publicity. I am a publicist and explained how important invitations to reviewers and architects and interior designers and a range of publicity are to her career. She had an opening in Melbourne, few came and she sold nothing. After that huge disappointment she said to me, "From now on I'm doing it your way!" Then she became hugely successful.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of two Rosalie Gascoigne Assemblages. Rosalie had a huge oeuvre of Assemblages.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne Themes and influences She said that her art-making materials "need to have been open to the weather." She thus used mostly found materials: wood, iron, wire, feathers, and yellow and orange retro-reflective road signs, which flash and glow in the light. Some of her other best-known works use faded, once-bright drinks crates; thinly-sliced yellow Schweppes boxes; ragged domestic items such as torn floral lino and patchy enamelware; vernacular building materials such as galvanized tin, corrugated iron and masonite; and fibrous, rosy cable reel ends. These objects represent, rather than accurately depict, elements of her world. "The countryside's discards ... no longer suggest themselves but evoke experiences, particularly of landscape." Text is another important element of her work; she would cut up and rearrange the faded, naive lettering found on these items to create abstract yet evocative grids of letters and word fragments, sometimes alluding to the crosswords and poetry of which she was so fond. Knowledgeable and widely read, she was inspired amongst others by the artists Colin McCahon, Ken Whisson, Dick Watkins and Robert Rauschenberg, and the poets William Wordsworth, Peter Porter and Sylvia Plath. She also had a fondness for the pronouncements of Pablo Picasso. However gradually both colour and text seemed to fade from her work, and in her final years she created meditative, elegiac compositions of white or earth-brown panels. Although working vigorously into her 80s, with occasional help from an assistant, her age at the height of her success precluded the travelling that would have been necessary to build the international audience her work deserved. Although she exhibited occasionally overseas—including the 1982 Venice Biennale (the first Australian woman to do so), Switzerland and Sweden as well as throughout Asia (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan among others), the major holdings of her work remain in Australia and New Zealand, both of which claim her as their own. Fine examples of Gascoigne's oeuvre can be found in most Antipodean galleries. The Metropolitan Museum of Art owns one of her smaller pieces. Major collections Art Gallery of Ballarat[4] Art Gallery of New South Wales[8] Art Gallery of South Australia[9] Art Gallery of Western Australia[8] Artbank[9] Geelong Art Gallery[9] Latrobe Regional Gallery[8] Metropolitan Museum of Art[8] Museum of Contemporary Art Australia[9] Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa[9] National Gallery of Australia[10] National Gallery of Victoria[11] Queensland Art Gallery[12]
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne with her grandson.
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne and her astronomer husband Sidney "Ben" Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
A photo of Rosalie Gascoigne
People in this photo:
Rosalie Gascoigne
Jan 25, 1917 - Oct 23, 1999
Back to Top