Rose Helene Gardiner (1878 - 1959)

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Rose Helene Gardiner
1878 - 1959
Born
1878
Death
1959
Melbourne, Australia
Last Known Residence
Melbourne, Australia
Summary
Rose Helene Gardiner was born in 1878. She was born to Earles Edward Gardiner. She died in 1959 in Melbourne, Australia at age 81.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Rose Helene Gardiner
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Rose Helene Gardiner
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Melbourne, Australia
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Rose Gardiner died in in Melbourne, Australia
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Rose Gardiner died in in Melbourne, Australia
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Rose Helene Gardiner died in 1959 in Melbourne, Australia at 81 years of age. She was born in 1878. She was born to Earles Edward Gardiner.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Rose's lifetime.

In 1878, in the year that Rose Helene Gardiner was born, on June 15th, photographer Eadweard Muybridge - at the request of Leland Stanford - produced the first sequence of stop-motion still photographs. Stanford contended that a galloping horse had all four feet off the ground. Only photos of a horse at a gallop would settle the question and, using 12 cameras and a series of photos, Muybridge settled the question: Stanford was right. Muybridge's use of several cameras and stills led to motion pictures.

In 1897, when she was 19 years old, on July 17th, the Klondike Gold Rush began when the first successful prospectors returned to Seattle after mining in the Yukon. They arrived on the ships Excelsior and Portland, bringing vast quantities of gold - over $32,000,000 in today's money - and everyone rushed to become rich in the Yukon.

In 1902, Rose was 24 years old when about 150 thousand United Mine Workers went on strike in eastern Pennsylvania for a wage increase and more suitable hours. They eventually got a 10% raise and their workday was reduced from 10 hours to 9. Because winter was coming and most people at the time heated their homes with coal, President Teddy Roosevelt arbitrated between the owners and the workers - the first time that the Federal government arbitrated in a strike.

In 1937, she was 59 years old when on May 28th, the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge opened to cars. Taking 5 years to build, the 4,200-foot-long suspension bridge was an engineering marvel of its time - 11 men died during construction. The "international orange" color was chosen because it resisted rust and fading. To the present, it is the symbol of the City that is known throughout the world.

In 1959, in the year of Rose Helene Gardiner's passing, on August 8th, Hawaii became the 50th state of the United States. The US flag was changed to show 50 stars.

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