Rowland George Warmington

(1921 - 1943)

A photo of Rowland George Warmington
Rowland George Warmington
1921 - 1943
Born
c. 1921
Death
December 3, 1943
Summary
Rowland George Warmington was born c. 1921. He died on December 3, 1943 at 22 years old.
Updated: February 06, 2019
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Biography
Rowland George Warmington
Most commonly known name
Rowland George Warmington
Full name
Nickname(s) or aliases
Male
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Rowland Warmington was born
Birth
Rowland Warmington died on
Death
Rowland Warmington was born
Rowland Warmington died on
Birth
Death
Sutton Coldfield Cemetery Sec. C. Nonconformist. Grave 691. in United Kingdom
Burial / Funeral
Heritage
Childhood
Adulthood

Military Service

Service number: 142536
Rank: Flying Officer
Regiment: Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
Unit/ship/squadron: 24 Sqdn.
Obituary

Average Age

Life Expectancy

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Rowland George Warmington died on December 3, 1943 at 22 years old. He was buried in Sutton Coldfield Cemetery Sec. C. Nonconformist. Grave 691., United Kingdom. He was born c. 1921. We have no information about Rowland's family or relationships.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Rowland's lifetime.

In 1921, in the year that Rowland George Warmington was born, hugely popular Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, silent film star, was arrested for rape and manslaughter after an actress died following a party at his house. He was acquitted after three trials and the jury wrote a formal letter apologizing for the charges, but his career never recovered. His films were at first banned - the ban was lifted after a year - and he was mostly ostracized by the community. He died at 46..

In 1930, at the age of merely 9 years old, Rowland was alive when as head of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, William Hays established a code of decency that outlined what was acceptable in films. The public - and government - had felt that films in the '20's had become increasingly risque and that the behavior of its stars was becoming scandalous. Laws were being passed. In response, the heads of the movie studios adopted a voluntary "code", hoping to head off legislation. The first part of the code prohibited "lowering the moral standards of those who see it", called for depictions of the "correct standards of life", and forbade a picture from showing any sort of ridicule towards a law or "creating sympathy for its violation". The second part dealt with particular behavior in film such as homosexuality, the use of specific curse words, and miscegenation.

In 1931, he was only 10 years old when in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1943, in the year of Rowland George Warmington's passing, on March 31st, the Broadway musical Oklahoma! opened. Written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II (the first of their string of successful collaborations), audiences loved it. The musical ran for 2,212 performances originally and was made into a movie in 1954.

Other Warmingtons

Bio
c. 1885 - May 11, 1941 1885 - 1941
Bio
c. 1924 - Dec 7, 1943 1924 - 1943
Bio
c. 1890 - Sep 3, 1916 1890 - 1916
Bio
c. 1877 - Jan 20, 1918 1877 - 1918
Bio
c. 1896 - May 12, 1941 1896 - 1941

Other Bios

Bio
c. 1885 - May 11, 1941 1885 - 1941
Bio
c. 1924 - Dec 7, 1943 1924 - 1943
Bio
c. 1890 - Sep 3, 1916 1890 - 1916
Bio
c. 1877 - Jan 20, 1918 1877 - 1918
Bio
c. 1896 - May 12, 1941 1896 - 1941
Bio
c. 1870 - May 19, 1915 1870 - 1915
Bio
c. 1891 - Nov 13, 1916 1891 - 1916
Bio
c. 1898 - Nov 22, 1917 1898 - 1917
Bio
c. 1885 - Mar 21, 1918 1885 - 1918
Bio
Unknown - May 1, 1943 Unknown - 1943
Bio
c. 1880 - Feb 17, 1917 1880 - 1917
Bio
c. 1914 - Aug 29, 1942 1914 - 1942
Bio
c. 1876 - Mar 9, 1941 1876 - 1941
Bio
c. 1873 - Mar 29, 1918 1873 - 1918
Bio
c. 1922 - Feb 7, 1943 1922 - 1943
Bio
c. 1921 - Dec 17, 1941 1921 - 1941
Bio
c. 1896 - Aug 25, 1916 1896 - 1916
Bio
c. 1875 - Jul 29, 1944 1875 - 1944
Bio
c. 1919 - Sep 17, 1939 1919 - 1939
Bio
Unknown - Sep 14, 1914 Unknown - 1914
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