Ruth Barnes (1911 - 1979)

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Ruth Barnes
1911 - 1979
Born
June 28, 1911
Death
July 1979
Last Known Residence
Redmond, King County, Washington 98052
Summary
Ruth Barnes was born on June 28, 1911. She died in July 1979 at age 68. We know that Ruth Barnes had been residing in Redmond, King County, Washington 98052.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Redmond, King County, Washington 98052
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Ruth Barnes passed away in July 1979 at age 68. She was born on June 28, 1911. We have no information about Ruth's family or relationships. We know that Ruth Barnes had been residing in Redmond, King County, Washington 98052.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Ruth's lifetime.

In 1911, in the year that Ruth Barnes was born, the Triangle Shirtwaist fire occurred, one of the deadliest industrial disasters in U.S. history. 146 workers (123 women and 23 men, many of them recent Jewish and Italian immigrants) died from the fire or by jumping to escape the fire and smoke. The garment factory was on the 8th, 9th, and 10th floors of a building in Greenwich Village in Manhattan. Doors to stairwells and exits had been locked in order to prevent workers from taking unauthorized breaks and to prevent theft, so they couldn't escape by normal means when the fire broke out. Due to the disaster, legislation was passed to protect sweatshop workers.

In 1927, at the age of 16 years old, Ruth was alive when the first "talkie" (a movie with music, songs, and talking), The Jazz Singer, was released. Al Jolson starred as a cantor's son who instead of following in his father's footsteps as expected, becomes a singer of popular songs. Banished by his father, they reconcile on his father's deathbed. It was a tear-jerker and audiences went wild - especially when they heard the songs. Thus begun the demise of silent films and the rise of "talkies".

In 1931, when she was 20 years old, in March, “The Star Spangled Banner” officially became the national anthem by congressional resolution. Other songs had previously been used - among them, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", "God Bless America", and "America the Beautiful". There was fierce debate about making "The Star Spangled Banner" the national anthem - Southerners and veterans organizations supported it, pacifists and educators opposed it.

In 1963, when she was 52 years old, the British Secretary of War, 46 year old John Profumo ,was forced to resign when he lied about an affair with 19 year old Christine Keeler. Keeler was also involved with the Soviet naval attaché and charges of espionage were feared. No proof of spying was ever found.

In 1979, in the year of Ruth Barnes's passing, on November 4th, Iranian militant students seized the US embassy in Teheran and held 52 American citizens and diplomats hostage for 444 days. They were released at the end of the inauguration speech of the newly elected Ronald Reagan.

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