Sarah Rutherford (died 1929)

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Sarah Rutherford
1929
Death
April 23, 1929
St. Louis City, St. Louis City County, Missouri
Summary
Sarah Rutherford died on April 23, 1929 in St. Louis City, Missouri.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Biography
Sarah Rutherford
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Sarah Rutherford
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Sarah Rutherford died on in St. Louis City, St. Louis City County, Missouri
Death
Sarah Rutherford died on in St. Louis City, St. Louis City County, Missouri
Birth
Death
Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery Section 36 Site 3739-O 2900 Sheridan Road, in St. Louis, Missouri 63125
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Branch of service: Us Army
Rank attained: PVT
Wars/Conflicts: Civil War

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Sarah Rutherford passed away on April 23, 1929 in St. Louis City, Missouri. She was buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery Section 36 Site 3739-O, St. Louis, Missouri. There is no information about Sarah's family.

Add Sarah's birthday or the date she died to see a list of historic events that occurred during Sarah's lifetime.

In 1818, on April 4th, the United States Congress adopted the official flag of the United States. It had 13 red and white stripes - representing the original 13 colonies - and one star for each state (twenty at the time) with additional stars to be added whenever a new state was added to the Union.

In 1878, on June 15th, photographer Eadweard Muybridge - at the request of Leland Stanford - produced the first sequence of stop-motion still photographs. Stanford contended that a galloping horse had all four feet off the ground. Only photos of a horse at a gallop would settle the question and, using 12 cameras and a series of photos, Muybridge settled the question: Stanford was right. Muybridge's use of several cameras and stills led to motion pictures.

In 1890, on December 29th, the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred in South Dakota on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation . The U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment said that they rode into the Lakota camp "trying to disarm" the inhabitants. One person, Black Coyote - who was deaf - held onto his rifle, saying that he paid a lot of money for it. Shots rang out and by the end at least 153 Lakota Sioux - some estimates say 300 - and 25 troops had died. The site of the massacre is a National Historic Landmark.

In 1918, following European countries, Daylight Saving Time went into effect in the United States in March. It was an effort to conserve fuel needed to produce electric power. This was a war effort and proved unpopular so in most areas of the United States, Daylight Saving Time ended after World War I. It returned during World War II.

In 1929, in the year of Sarah Rutherford's passing, on October 29th (Black Tuesday), the stock market crashed in the United States. Billions of dollars were lost and some investors committed suicide as a result, having lost their fortunes. This ushered in the 12 year, worldwide Great Depression.

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