Sheffield Epps (1923 - 1984)

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Sheffield Epps
1923 - 1984
Born
June 26, 1923
Death
July 1984
Last Known Residence
Florida 32674
Summary
Sheffield Epps was born on June 26, 1923. Sheffield died in July 1984 at age 61. We know that Sheffield Epps had been residing in Florida 32674.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Sheffield Epps
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Sheffield Epps died in July 1984 at age 61. Sheffield was born on June 26, 1923. We are unaware of information about Sheffield's family or relationships. We know that Sheffield Epps had been residing in Florida 32674.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Sheffield's lifetime.

In 1923, in the year that Sheffield Epps was born, on September 1, an earthquake - the Great Kanto earthquake - destroyed one-third of Tokyo. Measuring 7.9 and with a reported duration of between 4 and 10 minutes, casualties totaled about 142,800 deaths, including about 40,000 who went missing and were presumed dead.

In 1937, when this person was just 14 years old, on May 28th, the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge opened to cars. Taking 5 years to build, the 4,200-foot-long suspension bridge was an engineering marvel of its time - 11 men died during construction. The "international orange" color was chosen because it resisted rust and fading. To the present, it is the symbol of the City that is known throughout the world.

In 1950, Sheffield was 27 years old when in February, Joe McCarthy gave a speech alleging that he had a list of "members of the Communist Party and members of a spy ring" who worked in the State Department. He went on to chair a committee that investigated not only the State Department but also the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Army for communist spies - until he was condemned by the U.S. Senate in 1954.

In 1960, by the time this person was 37 years old, on May 1st, an American CIA U-2 spy plane, piloted by Francis Gary Powers, was shot down by a surface-to-air missile over the Soviet Union. Powers ejected and survived but was captured. The U.S. claimed that the U-2 was a "weather plane" but Powers was convicted in the Soviet Union of espionage. He was released in 1962 after 1 year, 9 months and 10 days in prison.

In 1984, in the year of Sheffield Epps's passing, due to outrage about "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (it seemed too "dark" to many and it was rated PG), a new rating was devised - PG-13. The first film rated PG-13 was "Red Dawn".

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Created on Jun 04, 2020 by Daniel Pinna
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