Thomas Montague (1795 - 1860)

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Thomas Montague
1795 - 1860
Born
June 8, 1795
Fletcher, Vermont
Death
March 1860
Georgetown, Michigan
Summary
Thomas Montague was born on June 8, 1795 at Fletcher, Vermont. He died in March 1860 at Georgetown, Michigan at 64 years old.
Updated: February 6, 2019
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Thomas Montague
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Thomas Montague was born on at Fletcher, Vermont
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Thomas Montague died in at Georgetown, Michigan
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Thomas Montague was born on at Fletcher, Vermont
Thomas Montague died in at Georgetown, Michigan
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Thomas Montague died in March 1860 at Georgetown, Michigan at 64 years of age. He was born on June 8, 1795 at Fletcher, Vermont. There is no information about Thomas's surviving family.

Refresh this page to see various historical events that occurred during Thomas' lifetime.

In 1814, by the time he was 19 years old, on September 14th, Francis Scott Key wrote what we now know as the lyrics of the Star-Spangled Banner while he watched the British attack on Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor. He originally wrote a poem titled "Defence of Fort M'Henry". The lyrics of the poem were then set to the tune of a popular English song. It wasn't until 1931 that the song became the official national anthem of the United States.

In 1831, by the time he was 36 years old, on August 21st, in the United States, Nat Turner's slave rebellion broke out in Southampton County, Virginia. Rebel slaves, led by Nat Turner, killed from 55 to 65 people - the largest and deadliest slave uprising in U.S. history. The rebellion was suppressed after a few days and Virginia executed 56 slaves accused of being part of the rebellion although many were innocent. Nat Turner was captured on October 30th, tried, and hung on November 11th.

In 1840, by the time he was 45 years old, on February 6th, Māori chiefs and the British parliament signed the Treaty of Waitangi. The Treaty created a British governor of New Zealand and gave the Maori people the rights of British citizens.

In 1850, at the age of 55 years old, Thomas was alive when on September 9th, in the middle of the Gold Rush, California was admitted to the US as the 31st state. Previously the western part of Alta California, the state, by itself, is now has the 6th largest economy in the world when compared to other countries.

In 1860, in the year of Thomas Montague's passing, on February 26th, near Eureka California, white settlers attacked a tribe of Wiyot Indians on Indian Island. Over 60 women, children and older people died. Bret Harte - a writer and friend of Mark Twain - reported the news about the massacre to the papers in San Francisco.

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